1994

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 55th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 12-14, 2014

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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Steer Roping; 2 complete go rounds of Steer Roping

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

7:00PM TO ?:??PM

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 1994

 
 

RODEO DATES: 17th, 18th, 19th, & 20th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Bill Pickett Family
RODEO QUEEN: Kristy Buck SPECIALTY ACT: Max Reynolds  & Ted Kimzey

Tourism and Recreation Department Rates Ranch Rodeo 'One Of The Best'

 

According to the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department, one of the best rodeos around this season is the Ponca City Ranch Rodeo, right here in Ponca City Friday and Saturday at the 101 Rodeo Arena.

The second annual event will feature cowboys from across Oklahoma competing for a generous purse, respect, and a leg-up on their rodeo rivals. It is sanctioned by Oklahoma Ranch Rodeo Cowboy's Association, and sponsored by Jimmy's Western Wear and Head Country Bar-B-Que.

 

"This is only our second year, and already we're expecting the purse to be larger than some of the other ORRCA rodeos in other areas," said Brad Dickey, vice chairman of the 101 Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, coordinator of the event.

 

Ranch rodeo differs from traditional rodeo, teams compete against one another, rather than individuals. Twenty teams, comprised of four cowboys each, compete in five events for two nights. The winning team takes home the ultimate purse, but second and third place also receive cash prizes.

"The fans seem to enjoy ranch rodeo because there's so much to see and do," Dickey said. "We try to make this event family-oriented, to allow everyone to have a good time."

 

"I think the cowboys who compete really enjoy the rodeo," Dickey added. "It won't make them rich, but it gives them the chance to get away, see interesting towns and meet great people," Dickey told Fred Halstied of the OTRD. "Plus, the money they make usually pays for traveling and other expenses that would normally be out-of-pocket".

 

According to Halstied, the rodeo will feature five main events plus an added children's event, including branding, pasture roping, tie-down mugging, penning, wild milking and a youngster calf scramble.

 

In the branding event, a calf must be sorted from a group and the roper must corral and calf alone. Once he is corralled, other members of the team can brand the calf with a chalked branding iron.

 

Pasture roping is a form of team roping by cutting a calf loose from a herd. Tie-down mugging also involves cutting a calf from the herd, but the cowboys must tie two or three of the calf's legs together.

 

The penning event involves calling two calves, bringing them into the open arena, and sending them into the "pen," which is a long trailer on one side of the arena.

 

The fifth event is the wild milking event, which involves sending one large, wild cow from the bucking chutes into the arena and four cowboys waiting for her at the other end. The cowboys must rope the cow and milk her. "Here's the catch," says Dickey, "the milk must be drawn into a baby bottle. People love the wild milking event," he said. "It can get wild sometimes, because it's tough to draw milk into a baby bottle, but it's a lot of fun."

A number of playful and lively calves are donned with ribbons for the youngster calf scramble. For this event, organizers allow kids into the arena to collect ribbons from the calves. Those who collect the most ribbons in the allotted amount of time can turn them in for cash prizes.

 

The rodeo begins at 7 p.m. both nights, Ticket prices are $5 for adults and $3 for children.

 

For more information, call Scott Klososky (405) 765-2340 or Brad Dickey at (405) 767-3916.

Local Entries Have 24-Hour Time Frame For 101 Rodeo

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is less than three weeks away!

 

And for the second year in a row, the rodeo will run four nights, Aug. 17 through Aug. 20. Performances of the rodeo will begin at.7 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday nights, and 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights.

 

Local entries will be spicing some of the events this year, but they'll have to appear at Today's Technology Center within a 24-hour period, according to Terri Buell of the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation.

 

Local entries will be taken from 11 a.m. on Aug. 9, and close at 11 a.m. on Aug. 10, according to Buell. The Rodeo Office has moved from the Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce, to the Today's Technology Center, at 205 West Hartford Avenue.

 

Back by popular demand this year are the Wrangler Bullfights, sponsored by McVay's Outfitters. The bullfights will take place on Thursday and Saturday night.

 

Competition in the bullfights pits a bullfighter and bull, one on one. Each bullfighter gets a minimum of 40 seconds and a maximum of 70 seconds with the meanest, rankest bulls of the stock contractor. Judges combine a score for the bullfighter, and the bull. Competing in the Wrangler Bullfights will be Rodney Hayes, Mike Johnston and Kevin Rich.

 

This years stock contractor and rodeo producer will be the Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan.

 

All four nights will also feature Max Reynolds with Roman Riding and trick roping.

 

Adult tickets are $7.50 at the gate Wednesday through Friday, and $8.50 on Saturday. Advance tickets for adults are $6 Wednesday through Friday and $7 for Saturday. Advance tickets are available at Ponca City banks and financial institutions and all grocery stores, plus McVay's and the Chamber of Commerce office. Tickets for children 12 and under are $3 and youngsters six and under get in free.

 

However, Wednesday and Thursday have been designated as "family night" at the rodeo, and all children 12 and under are admitted free.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is associated with some of the biggest corporate names in rodeo. This year, sponsors include Coca-Cola and Copenhagen/Skoal.. Two new sponsors include Budweiser, distributed locally by 101 Beverage, and Dodge Truck Rodeo, sponsored by Dodge Trucks and Pemberton Dodge of Ponca City.  Incidentally, cowboys will be able to compete for additional monies and points only awarded at Dodge Truck Rodeos.

 

Fans will be able to register for a new Dodge Cummins Diesel Pickup to be given away nationally. Locally, fans will be able to win some of the $2,000 in prizes Dodge will give away, including a Ramsey Winch, Mopar bed liner, and much more. Registration takes place at Pemberton Dodge, and at the Dodge Truck display at the rodeo.

 

This years rodeo dance will feature the music of Brent Self and Tumbleweed. The rodeo dance will get under way at 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday night. The dance will be held in the northwest corner of the rodeo grounds. Tickets for the dance will be available at the gate for $5.

 

Saturday will be a big day for participants, as the 101 Ranch Rodeo parade will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Aug. 20. The parade will assemble at Ponca City Middle School (formerly West Junior High School), and then move east on Grand Avenue to Seventh Street. Anyone interested in participating in the rodeo parade should call the rodeo office at 765-2980.

 

There will be a pancake feed before the parade, at the Masonic Lodge, beginning at 7 a.m.

35th Running Of 101 Rodeo

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making it's second four-night run in Ponca City, after many years of three-night performances as the 101 Ranch Rodeo.

 

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be August 17, 18, 19, 20, with performances on the first night being at 7 p.m.; followed on the Friday and Saturday performances set for 8 p.m.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue, and not at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect.

 

1994 will mark the 35th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo—the once mighty 101 Ranch.

 

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

 

The 101 Ranch, established by Co!. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends—the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

 

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

 

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment incentive for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut, as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

 

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962.

 

The 1994 rodeo will attempt to bring a fourth straight "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Colorado and Kansas.

 

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, and the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Scott Klososky, contracts with a number of interesting one-act exhibitions for the four-night stand.

 

Another feature, besides the regular program of riding and timed roping events for the cowboys and the barrel racing, is the Wrangler Bullfight Tour, which adds another element of excitement to the entertainment and will be making its second appearance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

That will pit the world's best bullfighters against the rankest buckin' bulls and specially-bred Mexican bulls in a one-on-one contest for points toward the world championship. The arena is shortened for the competition, to all for more fierce competition.

 

Additionally, the foundation has contracted with Bud Rodeo, as a primary contributor to added purse money. And , the Dodge Circuit sponsored locally by Pemberton's will be an addition for the rodeo.

 

Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena chutes, where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes.

 

Many special events happen during "rodeo week." They include an exciting parade, the excitement of 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contestant activities, special nights for barbecue and dances, and the appearance of the Po-Hi band as the official 101 Wild West Rodeo Cowboy Band, under the direction of Steve Workman.

 

Contestants will be tested for their skills in bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, steer roping and calf roping, when they do it against the stock of the Rumford Rodeo Company. For the past few years, the Rumford Rodeo Company has been the stock contractor and producer of the rodeo.

 

Led by Floyd and Lola Rumford from Abbyville, Kan., the Rumford Rodeo Company got it's big lift when Floyd received his PRCA card in 1984 and for the last ten years has produced or subcontracted for rodeos across 17 different states.

 

Son Bronc Rumford is manager and co-owner of all the ranch operation and rodeo business. Bronc is also in great demand as arena director and pick-up man.

 

Tommy Rumford, also a PRCA contestant and co-owner of the family business, works as a pickup man, and in all phases of the horse business. This includes a horse and mule auction in Hutchinson, Kan., which the Rumfords have managed for more than 40 years.

Champion Bullfighter Here

 

For Wrangler bullfighter Ronny Sparks, 1993 was a roller coaster ride filled with plenty of highs and lows.

 

The lows happened during the regular season, and the ultimate high occurred Dec. 9 during the seventh round of the National Finals Rodeo, the final round of the Wrangler Bullfight finals.

 

Sparks claimed his second consecutive title in exciting, championship form. He pocketed $21,919 from the NFR and finished the year with $37,519, nearly $4,000 ahead of the No.2 man, Rob Smets. Not bad for a guy who had to climb from fifth place and wasn't even sure he would be able to compete because of a season riddled with injuries.

 

"It was a tough year," said Sparks of Texarkana, Texas. "I started off the year in Phoenix and tore my right hamstring. I went on to Pocatello (Idaho) for the Dodge National Circuit Finals and Dr. J. Pat Evans and the Justin Sportsmedicine Program tried to get me ready, but the hamstring wouldn't respond.

 

"Then I broke my right ankle Oct. 20 and was told by J. Pat to ride a bicycle to get ready for the Finals."

 

Apparently, cycling and Sparks are a good match. He scored 81 points to win the first round at the Finals.

 

He maintained the lead through rounds two and three, and entered the fourth and final round with a $1,000 lead.

 

In the final round, he stepped in to face a bull named Ice Tea of the Harper and Morgan Rodeo Co. Sparks knew the bull well—he fought him one year earlier, almost to the day.

"I won the final round on him last year here," he said. "I scored 87 points and knew I had to win the round before I could win the world in 1992." It was almost like 1992 all over again for Sparks during the fourth I round in '93. He had to win the round to win the world title.

 

"I knew it was a bull I could win the round on, but it's also a bull that you don't want to screw up. If you make one little slip, there goes the world title," he said.

 

Although he was sore and his ankle was swollen, Sparks knew what he had to do. He looked up at the Copenhagen Skoal Pro Rodeo Scoreboard after the five bullfighters ahead of him had completed their fights. All that was between Sparks and his second world title was 70 seconds and 81 or more points.

 

As the gate cracked open, Sparks went head to head with the bull. He was in complete control as the seconds ticked away. When he threw his hat after fighting the bull to a near standstill on the barrel, Sparks saw the crowd rise to its feet— they had witnessed one of the best bullfights ever in Thomas and Mack Center.

 

Sparks awaited the score and NFR announcers Bob Tallman and Phil Gardenhire called it out in stereo 89 points! Sparks had won the round, tied the arena record and claimed his second straight world title.

 

Rodeo fans at the 101 Wild West Rodeo here in Ponca City this week will get a chance to see the champion in action. Sparks will be competing against Rodney Hayes and Mike Johnston on Thursday and Saturday nights.

 

Hometown: Texarkana, Texas
Date of Birth: January 25, 1964.
Height and weight: 5-11, 175 pounds.
1993 Earnings: $37,519.
1993 NFR Earnings: $21,919.
Year joined PRCA: 1988.
NFR Qualifications: Wrangler Bullfight (3) 1990, 1992, 1993.
World Titles: Wrangler Bullfight 1991, 1993.

Barbecue And Special Music

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is this week!

 

And for the second year in a row, the rodeo will run four nights, Aug. 17 through Aug. 20. Performances of the rodeo will begin at 7 p.m. on ,Wednesday and Thursday nights, and 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights.

 

Local entries will be spicing some of the events this year.

 

Head Country Bar B Q restaurant will be holding a barbecue dinner Thursday night before the rodeo. The event will be on the northwest corner of the rodeo grounds, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets will be available at the gate for $4 for adults, and $3 for youngsters. Dinner includes chopped brisket and all the trimmings, plus all the beer, tea, or lemonade you can drink. There will be live music as well. And remember, Thursday night is one of the family nights at the rodeo, that all youngsters 12 and under get in free.

 

Another special treat on Thursday night will be Shannon Love, 8year-old daughter of Mark and Lisa Love, to perform the National Anthem at the rodeo.

 

Back by popular demand this year are the Wrangler Bullfights, sponsored by McVay's Outfitters.

 

The bullfights will take place on Thursday and Saturday night.

 

Competition in the bullfights pits a bullfighter and bull, one on one. Each bullfighter gets a minimum of 40 seconds and a maximum of 70 seconds with the meanest, rankest bulls of the stock contractor.

Judges combine a score for the bullfighter, and the bull. Competing in the Wrangler Bullfights will be Rodney Hayes, Mike Johnston and the 1993 NFR champion, Ronny Sparks, who has been contracted to replace one of the Ponca City popular event men, Kevin Rich, who has had to withdraw as a result of a knee injury.

 

This years stock contractor and rodeo producer will be the Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan. All four nights will also feature Max Reynolds with Roman Riding and trick roping.

 

Adult tickets are $7.50 at the gate Wednesday through Friday and $8.50 on Saturday. Advance ticke1s for adults are $6 Wednesday through Friday and $7 for Saturday. Advance tickets are available at Ponca City banks and financial institutions and all grocery stores, plus McVay's and the Chamber of Commerce office. Tickets for children 12 and under are $3 and youngsters six and under get in free.

 

However, Wednesday and Thursday have been designated as "family night" at the rodeo, and all children 12 and under are admitted free.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is associated with some of the biggest corporate names in rodeo. This year, sponsors include Coca-Cola and Copenhagen/Skoal. Two new sponsors include Budweiser, distributed locally by 101 Beverage, and Dodge Truck Rodeo, sponsored by Dodge Trucks and Pemberton Dodge of Ponca City. Incidentally, cowboys will be able to compete for additional monies and points only awarded at Dodge Truck Rodeos.

 

Fans will be able to register for a new Dodge Cummins Diesel Pickup to be given away nationally. Locally, fans will be able to win some of the $2,000 in prizes Dodge will give away, including a Ramsey Winch, Mopar bed liner, and much more. Registration takes place at Pemberton Dodge, and at the Dodge Truck display at the rodeo.

This years rodeo dance will feature the music of Brent Self and Tumbleweed. The rodeo dance will get under way at 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday night. The dance will be held in the northwest corner of the rodeo grounds. Tickets for the dance will be available at the gate for $5.

 

Saturday will be a big day for participants, as the 101 Ranch Rodeo parade will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Aug. 20. The parade will assemble at Ponca City Middle School (formerly West Junior High School), and then move east on Grand Avenue to Seventh Street. Anyone interested in participating in the rodeo parade should call the rodeo office at 765-2980.

 

There will be a pancake feed be- a fore the parade, at the Masonic u Lodge, beginning at 7 a.m.

101 Wild West Rodeo To Hold Four-Day Run

 

So what if the 1994 Major League Baseball season has stopped short of completion with a players' strike.

 

Sports fans can take in the biggest spectator sport in the nation by attending the four-night 101 Wild West Rodeo right here in Ponca City starting at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

 

And if you really are a rodeo fan anyway, you can see some roping and steer wrestling tonight at the 101 Ranch Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue, when there are some "slack" performances. There's no charge for spectators during slack performances.

 

Steer wrestling performers can all be seen tonight starting at 7 o'clock. They are required to make, two appearances at the rodeo, since, it is a four-night event and the only way to do that is to appear at the slack events to be held either tonight or Saturday morning. They also appear throughout the four nights, but not all on the same evening.

 

Other performers that will take part in slack activity tonight include some calf ropers and some team ropers. Some steer roping slack will beheld Saturday starting at 10 a.m.

 

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation officials have said that box seats are still available for some of the performances. Anyone wishing to obtain box seats should call the rodeo office, 765-2980.

 

It will be family night both Wednesday and Thursday nights, with those performances at 7 p.m. The Friday and Saturday performances will begin at 8 p.m. However on Saturday, rodeo fans may wish to get there well ahead of time for the queen crowning ceremony, which will take place at 7:30 p.m.

 

And there will be a 101 Wild West Rodeo parade on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. Participants are scheduled to meet in the area of the Ponca City Middle School (the former West Junior High). The route of the parade will be along Grand Avenue, from the middle school to Seventh Street.

 

A special Head County Bar B Q Restaurant dinner will be held on the northwest part of the arena grounds Thursday, beginning at 5:30 p.m.

 

Also, on Friday night, the queens' horsemanship competition will be held, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the arena.

 

A pancake feed has been set for Saturday at 7 a.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 1200 West Grand Avenue.

 

And don't forget, there will be a rodeo dance both Friday and Saturday nights at the northwest corner of the arena grounds.

101 Wild West Rodeo Off To Fast Start

 

The four-night 101 Wild West Rodeo is all primed and ready for opening tonight at 7 p.m. in the 101 Ranch Arena located at North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

 

Tonight and Thursday, the rodeo will begin at 7 p.m., while on Friday and Saturday, the rodeo begins at 8 p.m. On Saturday, at 7:30 p.m., rodeo fans may wish to be on hand at least a half-hour earlier, because the crowning of the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen will take place.

 

The rodeo is produced by the Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan. It will feature the main rodeo events: bull riding, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, ca1f roping, steer wrestling, steer roping, team roping and barrel racing.

 

There was some slack competition held Tuesday night in the calf roping and steer wrestling. In both events, some of the competitors, completed two go-rounds and posted excellent times for other competitors to shoot at the rest of the week. All of the calf ropers and steer wrestlers were in competition  Tuesday, running through the first go-round.

 

T.J. Collins of Kingsville, Texas, had a 10.2 and 11.3 during the night for a 21.5 to establish the lead in calf roping.

 

Leading the two go-rounds of steer wrestling is Kendall Bolding of Yukon, Okla., who had a 4.2' and a 4.5 to finish at 8.7. The 4.2 was the best in the first go-round, but the 4.1 during some of the second go competition by Stephen Canik of Grand Charmier, La., will be equally tough to beat throughout the rest of the rodeo.

 

Also, for the Tuesday night slack, Randy Daves of Blanchard, Okla., had a 9.1 that was the best in calf roping, during the first go-round. The best in the second go-round was a 9.6 posted by Blair Burk of Durant, Okla.

 

Besides Daves in calf roping the other two leaders were Bill Huber of Albia, Iowa, at 9.3 and Marty Lindner of Giddings, Texas, with a 9.4.

 

Following Bolding in the first go-round of steer wrestling, were B Meyer of Checotah at 4.5. and Jus Smith of Cajun, Okla., with a 4.8

 

Other special times and events the rodeo include a barbecue dinner sponsored by Head Country Bar B Q at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, at the northwest corner of the arena grounds. There will be a rodeo dance on Friday and Saturday night, featuring the music of Brent Self and Tumbleweed. The dances get under way at 10 p.m.

 

The queens horsemanship event will be held at 5:30 p.m. Friday in the arena, and slack competition in the steer roping will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the arena.

Performances Sizzle At 35th 101 Rodeo

 

On a night when storm clouds threatened to blow in and wreak havoc Wednesday, the 101 Wild West Rodeo contestants put on some sizzling performances.

 

Storm clouds went south, but the rodeo stayed and contestants will be hard pressed to put higher marks or quicker times on the books of the 35th annual 101 event.

 

There are three nights of rodeo left beginning at 7 o'clock tonight, and then at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Sandwiched in between will be a special barbecue dinner, queen's horsemanship, special breakfast and appearance of the Bill Pickett family, Saturday morning slack, the rodeo parade and the selection of the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen.

 

There will also be two nights of dancing on Friday and Saturday, after the rodeo performances, around 10 p.m.

 

Steer wrestlers will still have to do some mighty quick catching of the animal out of the chute if they, want to even come close to Tuesday night's performance of Kendall Bolding, Yukon, Okla., who had two turnovers within a total of nine seconds. Performing during the, slack on Tuesday, Bolding had a 4.21 ' and then a 4.7 to finish with an 8.7 far the rodeo.

 

There have been some challengers, but most have either been turned away by a couple of extra steps from the chute, or an animal that just simply wouldn't turn over quick enough.

 

Best challenge Wednesday night came from Jason Lahr of Emporia, Kan., who had one of the night's 4.3 clockings. But Lahr on Tuesday had a 6.0 and that left him with 10.3. The other 4.3 on Wednesday was Daryl Coble of Crescent, who had to take a "no-time" Tuesday.

 

Set to challenge Bolding's times of 5.3 on Tuesday night during tonight's efforts is Dean Phelps of Canute. Others still looking for that second effort during the next three nights include Rick Sims of Copan, who had 5.4; Bob Spillers of Amaril10,5.3; John Fontenot of Moore with a 5.5 and James King of Wann with a 5.6. But they'll have to be extremely fast in doing it.

 

High quality stock from the Rumford Rodeo Company proved to be just what some of the bull riders needed also, as two of the contestants put 76s on the board the first night of competition. They were Chris Littlejohn of Tulsa on Bugsy, and Adriano Moraes of Keeler, Texas, on Tong.

 

Several other high marks were awarded, with a 74 by Mark Ward of North Platte, Neb. 73 by Kent Fulfer of Daingerfield, Texas and Atoka's Mark Cain with a 72 on Jukebox, a bull that reportedly had not been ridden for the count this year.

 

The girls barrel racing was also close for the first night, and the remaining three nights will find riders attempting to break the 16-second barrier. Sharon Smith of Dibble Okla., almost did it with a 16.13, but she almost put herself out of the money when the second barrel of the cloverleaf toppled, adding a five-second penalty to make it 21.3.

 

However, Holly Swanson of Simms, Mont., had a 16.20 and that was more than three-tenths of a second better than second place. Mardee Hollenbeck of Pratt, Kan., had a 16.52 and Angie Clark of Colcord, Okla., had 16.58.

In the other timed event from Tuesday's slack that found calf ropers putting their second marks on the boards, T.J. Collins of Kingsville, Texas, saw his 21.5 get shattered.

 

Billy Bob Hutto of North Zulch, Texas, had a 10.0 to go with an 11.5 for a 21.5, but that only tied Collins. Three others proved to be even quicker in two go-rounds. Best for the rodeo so far is Bill Huber of Albia, Iowa, who had a 9.1 on Wednesday to go with what had been the second best first go-round of 9.3 for a combined 18.4.

 

Also quicker than the 21.5s, were a pair from Henryetta. Mike Johnson had a 10.6 to go with Tuesday's 9.9 for 20.5 and Gary Johnson had 10.7 to go with the 10.0 on Tuesday, for a 20.7.

 

Best challenges could come from Marty Lindner of Giddings, Texas, with a 9.4; Larry Snyder of Medicine Lodge, Kan., who had a 9.7 an Ponca City's high school national finalist a few weeks back, Jerome Schneeberger, who had a 10.0 on Tuesday.

 

The rodeo's other rough stock riding got off to a good start. In the saddle bronc riding, Terrence Farwell of Boring, Ore., had a 76. Best after that was Derek Clark of Colcord, Okla., who had 71 and Todd Fike of Pavillion, Mont., with a 67 Several contestants were able to stay on their steeds in the bareback riding, including Eric Mouton of Weatherford, who had a 74. There was a 73 by Payne Dobler of Andover, Kan., and a pair of 72s turned in by David Browder of Lakin, Kan., and Beau Mayo of Stephenville, Texas.

 

A pair of Arkansas team ropers proved to be quick. Shawn Harris and Clay Hurst did the trick, catching the steer around the horns and the hind legs, in 5.9. Best after that was 6.1 by Oklahoma ropers J.P. Wickett of Sallisaw and partner Jett Johnson of Yale. Britt Bockfus of Dewey and Bret Boatright of Mulhall had a 6.6. The team ropers have two go-rounds, with all contestants appearing during the night performances.

 

The other roping event will all be held on Saturday during slack, with , all steer roping contestants in the arena after the 10 a.m. start. There , will be some steer roping competition during the Saturday night event.

Rodeo Weathers The Storm

 

Storm clouds wouldn't go away, but the 101 Wild West Rodeo remained and so did some die-hard rodeo fans.

 

That was the story Friday night, as a thunderstorm watch was in effect until at least 11 p.m., and almost everyone had an eye on thunderheads as they built from southwest, west, northwest and north of Ponca City. The clouds kept splitting up for the most part, until about 8:45p.m.

 

With the beginnings of a shower, some fans began scurrying for cover,. but the yellow and orange slickers worn by rodeo personnel began unfolding and the rodeo stayed on schedule except for specialty acts.

 

The Rumford Rodeo Company and the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation continued their efforts to provide all that was expected. But when rain came pouring down after the fourth event and already one specialty act nixed, a decision to cut the remaining specialty act out was made.

 

Rodeo events continued, into the bull riding, and Mexican Sweat poker was played once again. However, when it came time to make any type of decision for the Wrangler Bullfight, officials said it was too slick to take a chance on a bullfighter going down and becoming injured. Plans are to have a Wrangler Bullfight before the bull riding event, and one after, to get the required three fights in. One was held on Thursday.

 

Bareback riders got their opportunities without the rain, and made the most of it with Ronny Kitchens of Kemp, Texas, even getting a re-ride later in the program. He made that payoff with a 70 and Ted Osman of Weyauwega, Wis., was the only other bareback rider to score, with a 69. Kitchen joined Shawn Frey of Norman in sixth place.

 

Attention was then turned to the steer wrestling, and only two performers were able to escape from being caught leaving too soon or at least wrestling down the steer. Tops for the night Friday was James T. King, Wann, Okla., who had a 7.4, and that put him at 13.0 including the 5.6 he had on Tuesday during slack. King's effort put him in eighth place as of Friday night.

 

John Fontenot of Moore had a 9.9 but had recorded too high a score during the slack.

Two saddle bronc riders moved into the top three. They were Paul L. Peterson, Guymon and Bret Franks, Goodwell, each with 72s. They were in a tie for third behind Joe Beckham of Richland Hills, Texas, who had a 7.7 on Thursday and Terrence Farwell of Boring, Okla., who had a 76 on Wednesday.

 

None of the calf roping entries were able to get into the top eight, but Ponca City's Hank Hainzinger showed up with the best time. Hainzinger had a 13.1, but his no time of Tuesday slack kept him out of the two go-round money.

 

Dale Christenson Jr., Pawhuska, had a 15.7 on Friday and Robbie Pierce of Locust Grove had a 17.9. Christenson thus finished with 34.1 and Pierce had a 30.6. Delee Peterson's 19.8 gave the Bartlesville roper a 33.2 for the two-go.

 

Leader of the barrel racing, Holly Swanson of Simms, Texas, remained on top as of Friday night with her 16.20 on Wednesday. But Deborah Hohon of Gladewater, Texas, moved into second place with a 16.28, a scant hundredth of a second better than Collette Baier of Hardtner, Kan., at 16.29.

There were some others who moved into the money, including Tracey Crosby Horton of Quitman, Texas, fourth at 16.37 and Felicia Otis, of Alex, Okla., with a 16.43. Then, also Kay Young of Overbrook, Okla., with a 16.57 sandwiched between Kristen Tadlock and Angie Clark. Stephanie Essman of Stillwater joined Clark at 16.58.

 

Best effort on Friday in the team roping came from Dallas Martin, Stillwater and Terry Moore, Burbank, at 6.8. But they had no-time on Thursday. Jumping at the effort to put two times on the board and into the leader spot were Bronc Rumford and Mark Miller of Abbyville, Kan., who had a 13.0 Thursday and a 13.2 Friday for a 26.2, best in team roping.

 

They were followed by Lance Crouch of Garden City and Lester Cress of Brewster, as the two Kansans put a 14.5 on the board Friday to go with the Thursday catch of 13.6, or 28.1.

 

With rain coming down harder and harder, the bull riding .event found one of the contestants get into the top five. Best according to the officials was a 73 by Larry J. Hynarcik, West, Texas, who thus was at the No.8 position.

Contestants Top Previous Scores

 

Roping and steer wrestling marks survived Thursday night's running of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, but you certainly can't say that for some of the riding events.


Two out of the three riding events at the rodeo saw new leaders posted, and contestants remaining in those events for tonight and Saturday will have to really show off if they want to get on top.

 

Tonight and Saturday, performances begin at 8 p.m. However, on Saturday, the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen will be named during ceremonies beginning at 7:30 p.m. A rodeo parade will be held in downtown Ponca City starting at 10:30 a.m. Saturday. The parade route will be along Grand Avenue from Oak Street to Sixth Street. There will be some slack performances beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, mostly in the steer roping.

 

Spectators were wowed early Thursday when 8 year-old Shannon Love, daughter of Mark and Lisa Love, performed the National Anthem to a hushed, attentive crowd.

 

But spectators also were hushed late in the rodeo, when bull rider Michael Woodruff of Fort Smith, Ark., lay flat on the arena floor after being injured by the bull he had attempted to ride. Woodruff was taken from the arena on a Ponca City Fire Department ambulance long-board, but ambulance personnel said "he was all right after the doctor looked him over and he walked away. He'll feel pretty sore Friday, after being stepped on by the bull."

 

There were some performances that really had the crowd cheering. One was by Curt Lyons of Ardmore in bull riding. He scored 78 and now leads the event, passing Wednesday's76s on by Adriano Moraes of Keller, Texas, and Chris Littlejohn of Tulsa.

 

Other top scores in bull riding Thursday came from Joaquin Garza, Marion, Texas, 75; N.D. Page, Ardmore, 74; and Tracer Hand, Waco, 74. Mark Ward of North Platte, Neb., had a 74 on Wednesday.

 

Not to be outdone, in the saddle bronc riding, Thursday's best of 77 by Joe Beckham, Richland Hills, Texas, took over the top spot.

 

Terrence Farwell of Boring, Ore., had a 76 on Wednesday and Derek Clark of Colcord, Okla., had a 71. Two other saddle bronc riders scored to get into the top five, including Butch Braden, Welch, Okla., 70, and Jimmy McCarley, Azle, Texas, 69.

 

And the Wrangler Jeans bull fighting competition at the end of the rodeo, saw 1993 National Finals Rodeo champion Ronny Sparks of Texarkana, Texas, score an 82. Mike Johnson of Mount Selman, Texas, had a 77 and Rodney Hayes of Linden, Texas, had a 74.

 

Leading bareback riders of Wednesday were able to stay at the top. Best on Thursday was Shawn Frey of Norman, with a 70, and that's sixth at the present time behind Eric Mouton, Weatherford, who had a 74 and Payne Dobler of Andover, Kan., with a 73. Two at 72 were David Bowder of Lakin, Kan., and Beau Mayo of Stephensville, Texas and a 71 by Robert Soileau of Stephensville.

 

The barrel racing leader Holly Swanson of Simms, Texas, remained on top by nine-hundredths of a second. She had 16.20 on Wednesday and longtime national performer Collette Baier of Hardtner, Kan., was clocked in 16.29 on Thursday.

 

There were two other good times on Thursday, including Kirsten Tadlock of Fort Smith, Ark., 16.56 and Brenda Raupe, Douglass, Kan., with 16.66. However they were in fourth and sixth positions, while Wednesday competitors Mardee Hollenbeck, Pratt with 16.52 and Angie Clark, Colcord, Okla., at 16.58 remained in contention.

 

There were no changes in the team roping event. Top four on Wednesday were under 6.7 and included a 5.9 by Shawn Harris and Clay Hurst of Conway, Ark.

 

Kendall Bolding of Yukon, Okla., also remained the best in steer wrestling with his combined 8.7 on two Tuesday night slack performances of 4.2 and 4.5. Jason Lahr of Emporia, Kan., had a 4.3 Wednesday to go with a 6.0 for 10.3 and second place presently.

 

Thursday, Todd Suhn, North Platte, Neb., had a 5.1 to go with a 6.7 and post a combined 11.8 - good enough for fifth. He is followed by Doug Janke, Wichita who had 5.2 on Thursday for a combined 11.9 and Paul Hightower of Weatherford,. with a 4.6 for a combined 12.6.

 

The top calf roper Wednesday, Bill Huber, Albia, Iowa, clung to his spot with that 18.4 he posted from a 9.30n Tuesday and 9.1 on Wednesday. Walt White of Okmulgee, put a 9.9 on the board Thursday to go with his 10.6 on Tuesday to get into a second place tie with Mike Johnson of Henryetta, at 20.5. Gary Johnson of Henryetta remained - fourth at 20.7 followed by T.J. Collins, Kingsville, Texas and Billy Bob Hutto of North Zulch, Texas, both at 21.5.

Rain, Mud Didn't Dampen Enthusiasm At 101 Rodeo

 

In what closely resembled a hog-wallow of sorts, cowboys provided 101 Wild West Rodeo entertainment at its best here Saturday night.

 

Following 2.23 inches of rain which began during the performances on Friday and ended Saturday morning, the arena was anything but a nice and freshly worked area Saturday. That's when rodeo fans began watching activity that opened with the crowning of the 101  Wild West Rodeo-queen; Kristy Buck, 15-year-old daughter of Joseph and Kathy Buck, Ponca City.

 

However, the fans certainly could not have been disappointed with the scores turned in during most of the events. There were championships won Saturday night in the bareback and saddle bronc riding events, two times amazingly under 10 seconds in the calf roping, a steer roping time of 14.3, a 'girl barrel racer turning the cloverleaf in 16.55 for seventh overall, a 7.8 in the team roping event and a 4.2 in the steer wrestling.

 

The excitement of the Wrangler Bullfights was double for the rodeo fans on Saturday, who got to see two of the events as a result of Friday's being waved off because of very slick conditions.

 

National Finals Rodeo Bullfighter of the Year Ronny Sparks of Texarkana, Texas, took top honors. He had an 82, 77 and 79 for 238 taking $2,475. Second went to Mike Johnson, who had 77,76 and 74 respectively, taking $1,575 for the three performances and Rodney Hayes had 75, 73 and 72 for the three performances, garnering $450.

 

Mexican Sweat poker, during the bull riding event late in the program, provided even more thrills, when Ponca City Rodeo Foundation officials president Scott Klososky and vice president Brad Dickey, stayed on their chairs until literally being knocked from them by bull.

 

However, rodeo fans Saturday will tell you that Bill Coleman is no Mexican Sweat poker player, as he left before the bull was even released. He was rewarded when he went face-first into the hogwallow mud.

 

Specialty acts were well-received, The antics of Ted Kimzey, plus the trick roping and the Roman Riding Horses display by Max Reynolds, were especially noteworthy because of the tough arena conditions.

 

A pair of Kansans scored high on Saturday in the bareback and saddle bronc riding events to wrest the top prizes.

 

Benny Joe McCoy of South Haven had a 78 in the bareback, and that was four points better than Eric Mouton of Weatherford, who had a 74 on Wednesday.


Another bareback score getting into the money was Brian Rice of Oklahoma City with a 73, three-way tie for third.

 

MCoy got $1,100.12 for his 78, while Mouton had $910.44 for second. Three with 73 shared third and got $531.10 each. They were David Browder of Lakin, Kan., Rice and Beau Mayo of Stephensville, Texas.

 

Moments later Matt Reed of El Dorado had an 80 in the saddle bronc riding event and that put him in first place over the 77 of Joe Belkham of Richland Hills, Texas, who had made his ride on Thursday. Clay Wilson of Miami, Okla., had a 71 to finish in a two-way tie for fourth.

 

Reed got $1,170.44 and Belkham got $968.64.

 

Third went to Terrance Ferrell of Boring, Ore., 76, for $766.84.

 

The best bull riding effort came from Curt Lyons on Thursday, when he had an official 80 for $1,564.26. Billy Latham Jr. of Wichita Falls, Texas, had the best on Saturday with a 73 and he tied for sixth, getting $89.9O.

 

Holly Swanson of Simms, Texas, on a 16.20 ride in the barrel racing Wednesday survived all others and kept first place money, Best on Saturday was a 16.55 for seventh place by Kim West of Oklahoma City.

 

Swanson took $1,178.40 for first in barrels, while West got $245.50 for getting into the top seven on Saturday. Others included second place Deborah Hohon of Gladewater,Texas, 16.28 for $932.90 and third place Collette Baier, of Hardtner, Kan., 16.29 for $785.60.

 

The best team roping time was turned by a team that included Tom Self of Carrollton, Texas and John Coughran, Edmond, a 7.8. Individually, the best came Wednesday when Shawn Harris and Clay Hurst of Conway, Ark., had a 5.9.

 

Harris and Hurst got $611.80 apiece for that effort in the first go-round, and, Terry Moore, Burbank and Dallas Martin of Stillwater had a 6.8 on the second go-round for the same. Best overall came from the 20.1 of Justin Johnson, Yale and Shannon Frascht, Burlington, Okla., taking home $611.80 each also.

 

In the steer wrestling on Saturday, Sean Lanciano of Ponder, Texas, had a,4.2 and that tied him with Kendall Bolding, Yukon, Okla. But Bolding put a 4.5 with his 4.2 for the best two go-rounds, an 8.7.

 

Bolding, for his two scores, had $1,205.78 in the first go, $374.21 for his fifth in the second go, and the 8.7 earned an additional  $1,205.78 as the winner in two go-rounds. Best in the second go-round was Stephan Canik of Grand Chenier, La., with a 4.1 for $1,205.78.

 

T.W. Snyder of Medicine Lodge had, a 9.8 and Gannon Quimby, Mannforq, Okla., had a 9.9 in the calf roping. They couldn't duplicate the efforts of Bill Huber, Albia, Iowa, who finished with 18.4 on two go-rounds, including a 9.3 on Tuesday during slack and a 9.1 on Wednesday.

 

Huber got $1,008.87 for his two go-rounds, plus the $1,008.87 for first in the second go-round and $834.93 being second in the first go-round. Randy Davis had a 9.1 in the first go-round for $1,008.87. Following Huber in the two go-rounds were Walt White of Okmulgee, and Mike Johnson of Henryetta, both getting $747.96 for their 20.5 two go-round efforts.

 

The best steer roping Saturday night was a 14.3 by Shorty Garten of Pawhuska. It got him $384.39 for fifth place in toe second go-round, with most of the competition coming Saturday morning during slack. Tops in the second go-round of steer, roping was Gip Allen of Pawhuska on a 12.4 for $1,238.59. J.B. Whatley of Gardendale, Texas, had a 13.4 in the first go-round Saturday for $1,238.59 and Rocky Patterson of Pratt, Kan., earned $1,238.59 with a combined 29.4 in two go-rounds, one of which was a 14.2 in the first go-round.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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