1997

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

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Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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101 Wild West Rodeo History - 1997

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 13th, 14th, 15th, & 16th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Floyd Rumford
RODEO QUEEN: Lacy Dale Cully SPECIALTY ACT: Various Acts

Four Night 101 Wild West Rodeo Just Two Weeks From Tonight

 

The 38th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held nightly four nights in a row, starting Aug. 13, with the grand entry each night beginning at 8 p.m. That's just two weeks from tonight, folks!

 

There will be some special events prior to grand entry, so spectators may wish to be alerted to some of the special times for activities prior to the actual rodeo.

 

In particular is a new event that involves the youngsters. The first 101 (that's one hundred and one) youngsters ages 3-7 each night will receive a free stick horse that they can ride in the arena during the Stick Horse Grand Entry. The event starts at 7:45 p.m. each night, just prior to the rodeo, and is sponsored by 101 Country KPNC-FM and the Ponca City Wal-Mart Supercenter.

 

Another special event will be held on Thursday, Aug. 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. It is the Rodeo Barbecue Dinner, sponsored by Head Country BBQ Restaurant, United Supermarkets and Farha Wholesale. The barbecue will be held at the Moose Lodge at the southeast corner of North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue. Admission is free to the barbecue, but those attending must have a Thursday night advanced ticket to the rodeo. Donations are encouraged and will be accepted at the door, with all proceeds going to Domestic Violence.

 

While the actual rodeo performances will be held Aug. 13-16, there will be a slack performance, starting at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 12. It will run until 7 p.m., and then a special steer roping event will be held followed by additional slack. Admission to the slack and steer roping is $5. There will be two full go-rounds of steer roping.

 

The Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan., will again be the rodeo stock contractor and produce the rodeo.

 

Specialty acts for the rodeo include mini-chuck wagon races with two races nightly, and the performance of rodeo clown Gary Parli of Morrison, who has a business in Ponca City.

 

The queens contest will conclude with crowning of the 101 Wild West Rodeo 1997 queen on Saturday night. Contact person on the queens contest is Linda Mauk, 765-8864.

 

A rodeo parade will be held Saturday, Aug. 16, in downtown Ponca City. The event begins at 10 a.m. and admission to participate in the parade is free, although entrants should contact Chris Short, 762-9649.

 

The week has been designated as Rodeo week, and all are encouraged to dress western during the week.

 

Advance tickets are available at all Ponca City banks, all Ponca City grocery stores, Jimmy Western Wear, McVays Western Outfitters, Gradys Western Wear in Arkansas City, the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce.

 

Admission Wednesday and Thursday is $6 advance, or $7.50 at the gate. The two nights have been designated as family nights however, and youngsters under 12 will be admitted free. Children under 12 will be charged $3 on Friday and Saturday. The Friday and Saturday adult price will be $7 advance, or $8.50 at the gate.

 

A rodeo dance will be held after the rodeo on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 15-16, at Cassies Country, just north of Ponca City on Hubbard Road.

Ponca City Businessman Finds Time To Serve As 'Barrel Man'

 

Rodeo clown Gary Parli of Morrison, who was selected by the top 20 bullriders in the PRCA to serve as "barrel man" for the National Finals Rodeo in Oklahoma City, will be making appearances at the 101 Wild West Rodeo here this August.

 

Parli, who operates an Allstate Insurance agency in Ponca City, maintains a ranching operation in Morrison. A former college agri-business instructor and rodeo team coach, Parli Finds the clowning business an exciting summer activity. He started competing in rodeos while in high school, and in college he discovered a demand for clowns and bullfighters. He needed entry fee money and decided to try his hand at the risky profession.

 

As pointed out in a Deadwood, S.D., newspaper article by Barbara Ordahl, Parii started "clowning" rodeos in his native Oklahoma. He was a bullrider, but took a job as a clown to help pay his entry fees.

 

"The stock contractor told me I'd never make it as a bullrider, but I had great potential as a clown. I was looking for an excuse to quit bullriding anyway."

 

As with many clowns who continue in the sport, it just "got in his blood." He was tutored by another great rodeo clown, the late Buck LeGrand, and started clowning regularly in the summer of 1967.

 

One of Parli's routines involves a pair of newlyweds who travel to the rodeo in a red 1926 Model T Ford. The jalopy goes through a "bunch of comical mechanical flub-ups" inducing a humorous give-and-take between the bride and groom.

 

Having performed at rodeos in 30 states and three Canadian provinces, Parli has been featured at many of the top contests in North America, including the Elks Helldorado Days in Las Vegas, Nev,, Days of 47 in Salt Lake City, the College National Finals Rodeo, the Days of '76 in Deadwood, S.D., the Central States Fair and Rodeo in Rapid City, S.D. and the celebrated Calgary Stampede.

 

He was also selected by the top 15 circuit bullriders to work the Prairie Circuit Finals three times and the Great Lakes Circuit Finals once.

 

In October 1991, Parli was able to obtain one of his professional goals, by clowning at the Madison Square Garden rodeo in New York City.

 

Parli indicated in the Dead-wood story, that "many people think rodeo performers travel as a group the way circus performers do. We don't. We're all independent."

He generally doesn't know until he gets to a rodeo who his partner for the bullriding events will be. Horses can not be used to pick up bullriders, so a clown twosome consisting of a bullfighter and a "barrel man" work together to  distract the bull while the cowboy leaves the arena.

 

According to the Deadwood article, Parli has worked as both the bullfighter and barrel man. He gave up the former in 1978, two years after a bull hooked him under the left eye with a horn. Parli was unconscious for more than an hour, and his injury required 100 stitches and plastic surgery. Two weeks later, he worked his next rodeo.

 

"It's a risky profession with dangerous animals; anything can happen," Parli related at Deadwood. "You learn your limitations."

 

Parli has become a barrel man in the arena now, and stated "it's not really scary after 25 years,"

 

"You try to get down and get braced before a bull hits the barrel. You brace hands, legs, feet and head to buffet the impact."

 

Performances for the 101 Wild West Rodeo will begin at 8 p.m. each night during the four-night stand.

Familiar 'Painted' Face Returning To Perform At Wild West Rodeo

 

A familiar face (painted most of the time) returns to the 101 Wild West Rodeo in two weeks when bullfighter Mike Johnson makes his appearance.

 

Johnson has been hitting the 101 Wild West Rodeo and many other Prairie Circuit rodeos for quite some time. He'll be here for the four nights of the 101 Wild West Rodeo. Aug. 13-16.

 

As in many of the other instances, the roar of the crowd fades as Johnson's athletic body relaxes into a poised, ready crouch in front of the chute gate.


Beneath the wild grease paint, his face is set in total concentration as his eyes lock onto the fighting bull that is at once his teammate and adversary. The sport is American Bullfighting, and this Missouri native is one of its stars.

 

Johnson, 32, has been attracting horns for 14 years. After excelling in high school athletics he began clowning and fighting bulls, which helped him earn a degree in agribusiness. Ten years ago Johnson became a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and was voted to work the Southeastern Circuit Finals.

 

Johnson went on to perform at this prestigious rodeo again in 1989 and 1991. The lanky funny-man has dazzled and entertained fans at events such as the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, the Sikeston Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo in Missouri, La Fiesta de los Vaqueros in Tucson, .and the state fairs in Oklahoma and Texas, just to name a few.

 

Johnson has also thrilled crowds since 1989 with fearless maneuvers and daredevil jumps as a top 10 competitor on the Wrangler Bullfight Tour. Twice he has qualified for the National Finals Wrangler Bullfight Championships. He completed the 1994 regular season in sixth place which earned him a trip to the NFR. After an exceptional finals, which included a second go-round win and second in NFR money won, he finished in fourth place for the year. In 1996 he qualified in fourth place and remained in that position.

 

Johnson now resides in Mt. Selman, Texas, with his wife Ruby, their son, Colton Michae, and their pet Rottweiler's, Cowboy and Callie. He enjoys hunting, fishing, teaching bullfighting schools and working on his ranch as hobbies.

Volunteers Key To Rodeo Success


The cowboys and the animals are the stars, the obvious centers of attention.

 

But the stars of rodeo would never shine if it were not for the work of a large supporting cast, a cast that includes announcers, stock contractors, rodeo secretaries, timers, pickup men, chute laborers, specialty-act personnel and rodeo producers.

 

The whole thing wouldn't be worth the effort at all if it weren't for the dozens of volunteers that make up the Ponca City Rodeo Association.

 

Many of those volunteers spent from the 1996 rodeo making plans and seeing that some of the things were improved for this year's 101 Wild West Rodeo. It didn't happen overnight.

 

Rodeo Announcer Plays Key Role
One of the most vocal partners in the success of any rodeo is that of the rodeo announcer.

 

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation has been very successful in the recent years by having Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid handle the microphone duties of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

Phillips is no ordinary announcer. He brings 25 years of veteran announcing experience into the arena of professional rodeo.

Quail Dobbs, one of pro rodeo's funniest clowns, perhaps most accurately describes the key to Lynn Phillips announcing success as being the fact that "this man was vaccinated with a Victrola needle."

 

Indeed. Few would argue. The smooth and entertaining announcing style of Phillips has carried his career to the National Finals Rodeo, the National Circuit Finals Rodeo, the Old Timers National Finals Rodeo, the Women's National Finals Rodeo, AQHA World Show, and Area Reigning Horse Futurity.

 

But few know that Dr. Lynn Phillips has a specialty of his own. He is a practicing anesthesiologist and clinical professor at the OU Health Science Center.

Floyd Rumford Named Grand Marshal For Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is less than a week away and final plans are continuing to unfold from the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation.

 

One of the highlights during the week is the annual parade, set to begin at 10 a.m. from West Grand Avenue at Oak Street, heading east along Grand Avenue and ending at Sixth Street, according to chairman Chris Short.

 

Short said, "our Parade Marshal this year will be Floyd Rumford. He has been the stock contractor for the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the past several years, and has shown an extra personal interest in the activities that are provided here."

 

Rumford and his wife Lola, along with sons Bronc and Tommy Rumford and Bronc's wife Vicky are well known in the Profession-al Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA.) as one of the top producers in the country.

 

The Rumfords have provided stock for some 85 rodeos per year in 17 different states and in addition, have sent stock to Helsinki, Finland and Paris, France, for events. They also have participated with some of their stock annually at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.

 

Floyd Rumford has owned and operated a horse and mule sale in Hutchinson, Kan., the past 40 years. "He is an asset to the industry and a genuine friend and family man. We are honored to have him serve as our Parade Marshal for this years 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade," Short said.

 

Additionally on rodeo Saturday, a pancake feed will be held at the Masonic Lodge starting at 6:30 a.m., with the public invited.

Short said parade participants need to be ready for the lineup at 9:30 a.m., and any questions should be directed to him at 762-9649 or Stan Long, 765-7387.


Floats are requested to meet on the side street in front of the West Grand Avenue Church of Christ, for their progress east.

Those using horses in the parade, should meet in the grassy area south of the West Grand Church of Christ, and be able to produce a Coggins Test if requested. according to Short.

 

Classic car entries will be meeting on North Peachtree Street and North Birch Street, but are reminded to "please don't block driveways." Short said.

 

Political participants should gather on the side streets of North and South Lake Street.

 

The Rodeo Foundation this year is asking that "for the safety of the children," parade participants not throw candy.

 

The 38th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo is Wednesday through Saturday, Aug. 13-16, at 8 p.m. each night.

 

Tickets are available at all Ponca City banks, grocery stores, Jimmy's Western Wear, McVays Western Outfitters, Gradys Western Wear in Arkansas City, and the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce. Advance on Wednesday and Thursday are $6 with $7.50 at the gate, while it will be $7 advance for Friday and Satin and $8.50 at the gate. Chile under 12 get in free with par Wednesday and Thursday, an will be $3 for children under 12 on Friday and Saturday.

 

There will be rodeo slack Tuesday from 4 to 7 p.m., again immediately following steer roping. Admission for slack and steer roping is $5. steer roping set for two go rounds begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

STOCK PENS need clearing prior to the Rumford Rodeo Company bringing stock for the 101 Wild West Rodeo and Darrel Dye, one of the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation volunteers manned the tractor for mowing of weeds within the past couple of weeks in preparation for the activity.

NEW CHUTE HEAVENS were being assembled by using the previous press box area at the 101 Ranch Rodeo grounds. Welders and additional volunteers from the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation were on hand several nights in the past several weeks in preparation for the new chute heavens.

 

 

 


 

 

'Dress Western' For 101 Wild West Rodeo

 

This is 101 Wild West Rodeo Week!

 

As a result, it is "dress western" time for Ponca Citians, as a way of expressing involvement in the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation's big event of the year. So get out those "western" clothes and everybody enjoy the week.

 

One of the highlights during the week is the annual parade, set to begin at 10 a.m. from West Grand Avenue at Oak Street, heading east along Grand Avenue and ending at Sixth Street, according to chairman Chris Short.

 

Short said, "our Parade Marshal this year will be Floyd Rumford. He has been the stock contractor for the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the past several years, and has shown an extra personal interest in the activities that are provided here."

 

Rumford and his wife Lola, along with sons Bronc and Tommy Rumford and Bronc's wife Vicky are well known in the Profession-al Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) as one of the top producers in the country.

 

The Rumfords have provided stock for some 85 rodeos per year in 17 different states and in addition, have sent stock to Helsinki, Finland and Paris, France, for events. They also have participated with some of their stock annually at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.

 

Floyd Rumford has owned and operated a horse and mule sale in Hutchinson, Kan., the past 40 years. "He is an asset to the industry and a genuine friend and family man. We are honored to have him serve as our Parade Marshal for this years 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade," Short said.

 

Additionally on rodeo Saturday, a pancake feed will be held at the Masonic Lodge starting at 6:30 a.m.. with the-public invited.

 

Short said parade participants need to be ready for the lineup at 9:30 a.m., and any questions should be directed to him at 762-9649 or Stan Long, 765-7387.

 

Floats are requested to meet on the side street in front of the West Grand Avenue Church of Christ, for their progress east.

 

Those using horses in the parade, should meet in the grassy area south of the West Grand Church of Christ, and be able to produce a Coggins Test if requested, according to Short.

 

Classic car entries will be meeting on North Peachtree Street and North Birch Street, but are reminded to "please don't block driveways," Short said.

 

Political participants should gather on the side streets of North and South Lake Street.

 

The Rodeo Foundation this year is asking that "for the safety of the children," parade participants not throw candy.

 

The 38th annual 101. Wild West Rodeo is Wednesday through Saturday, Aug. 13-16, at 8 p.m. each night.

 

Tickets are available at all Ponca City banks, grocery stores, Jimmy's Western Wear, McVay's Western Outfitters, Grady's Western Wear, Arkansas City, and the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, Advance on Wednesday and Thursday are $6 with $7.50 at the gate, while it will be $7 advance for Friday and Saturday and $8.50 at the gate. Children under 12 get in free with parents Wednesday and Thursday, and it will be $3 for children under 12 on Friday and Saturday.

 

There will be rodeo slack on Tuesday from 4 to 7 p.m., and again immediately following the steer roping. Admission for the slack and steer roping is $5. The steer roping is set for two full go rounds, beginning at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

 

The rodeo will provide a number of specialty activity in addition to the regular bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, calf roping, steer wrestling, team roping and girls barrel racing events.

 

There will be mini-chuck wagon races with two races nightly, and special acts from rodeo clown Gary Parli.

 

On each of the four regular nights of rodeo, Wednesday through Saturday, there will be a stick horse grand entry. The first 101 youngsters through the gates on those nights, ages 3-7 will receive a free stick horse that they can ride in the arena during the stick horse grand entry. The event starts at 7:45 p.m., just prior to the rodeo and is sponsored by 101 Country KPNC-FM and the Ponca City Wal-Mart Supercenter.

 

Another special event will be d rodeo barbecue dinner that Head Country BBQ Restaurant, United Supermarkets and Farha Whole-sale, are sponsoring at the Moose Lodge Thursday night from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission is free with a Thursday night advanced purchase rodeo ticket, but donations are encouraged and will be accepted at the door with all proceeds going to Domestic Violence.

 

There is a rodeo dance also, after the rodeo on Friday and Saturday, at Cassies Country just north of Ponca City on Hubbard Road.

 

Additional activity will be provided, not only by the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, but through the effort of Dewey Kelly as he brings his trail riders and wagon train through Ponca City on Tuesday. The wagon train is expected in the south part of Ponca City near the Conoco green area prior to heading into town and along Grand Avenue to Ash Street and north to the rodeo grounds.

Ponca City Among Three-State Circuit

 

While some full-time rodeo cowboys bask in the glow of large arenas, most members of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association are circuit cowboys.

 

For the circuit cowboy, rodeo is something that follows a 40-hour work week. When the weekend hits, he loads up his horses or equipment and heads down the road, usually no more than a few hundred miles, to a PRCA rodeo.

 

That's not to say these competitors are any less serious about their sport than their marquee counterparts. But their families or professional obligations require them to stick close to home for most of the year.

 

In 1975 the PRCA recognized the need for an award system for these cowboys who might never qualify for the National Finals Rodeo.

 

To fill the void, the Association created the Circuit System, which is r composed of 12 geographic regions encompassing as few as one state, such as the Texas, Montana or Sierra circuits, to as many as 13 states, as in the First Frontier Circuit (Virginia north through Maine.

 

Every PRCA cowboy in the United States chooses a home circuit at the beginning of each year. If a cowboy fails to select a home circuit. the PRCA automatically assigns him the circuit that corresponds to his home address.

 

Circuit System cowboys compete for points throughout the year; those points earned within their circuits count toward their place in the circuit standings and their place in the world standings. However, points accrued at rodeos outside their circuits count only toward world standings, not circuit standings.

 

Each circuit's top cowboys in each event qualify for that circuit's "Finals" rodeo at season's end. Following all 12 circuit finals rodeos, the top regular season cowboys in each event and the winners of the circuit finals rodeos qualify for one of the PRCA's most prestigious events.

 

The Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo (DNCFR) is the crowning event of the PRCA's Circuit System. National circuit champions are determined at the event, which takes place each March in Pocatello. Idaho.

 

Locally, Ponca City is located in the Prairie Circuit, which includes Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma, under the guidance of Bronc Rum-ford, Abbyville, Kan., who just happens to be a large part of the Rumford Rodeo Company that will be the stock contractor and producer of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

The 1996 Prairie Circuit Champions includes Shawn Johnson all-around cowboy, and winner of the steer wrestling, title, as well. His hometown is Checotah. Others are Matt Reed, saddle bronc riding, a 32-year-old from El Dorado, Kan.: Eric Mouton, Weatherford bareback riding champion; Mark Cain. bull riding champion from Atoka; Mike Johnson, calf roping champion from Henryetta; team roping champion Shannon Frascht of Burlington, Okla.; and steer roping champion Buster Record of Buffalo, Okla.

38th 101 Wild West Rodeo Gets Under Way Tonight

 

The four-night 101 Wild West Rodeo begins tonight at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena where Ponca City Rodeo Foundation volunteers have put forth a mighty effort once again for the 38th annual event.

 

New red and white paint adorns much of the arena, but most noticeable in the "chute heaven" and stock area.

 

The old press box above the cowboys' dressing and preparation area has been removed for extra "chute heaven" spots and fans will notice quickly that the press box area is now located at the southwest corner of the arena — and now there's an air conditioned office area for the secretaries.

 

The grand entry for each night of the rodeo is set for 8 p.m., but there will be a "stick horse grand entry" involving the first 101 youngsters through the gates of the rodeo arena grounds. They will be given a special "stick horse" for a 7:45 p.m. grand entry into the arena.

 

The Rumford Rodeo Company will be providing the stock and producing the 101 Wild West Rodeo once again, while Dr. Lynn Phillips, Enid, will be the rodeo announcer. Specialty acts will include Ponca City businessman Gary Parli, rodeo clown and barrel man.

 

Action began in slack and steer roping performances Tuesday afternoon and night. It was a busy time for producer personnel, along with those many volunteers of the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation.

 

Cowboys and cowgirls both put on quite a show during the slack, with some of the cowgirls get-ting a "test run" of the barrels. Cowboys participated in team roping, steer wrestling and calf roping slack, with their times counting towards these next four nights. They'll be back to perform for the second go in many of the occasions.

 

There was one event that was held and completed, that being the steer roping. Steers are slightly bigger than the calves that calf ropers have to rope. Cowboys must lasso the steer around the horns, turns it with the slack rope bringing the steer to the ground. When the steer is lying on its side, the roper dismounts, and runs to tie any three legs of the steer.

 

Buster Record Jr. nabbed a total of $2,407.28 when he won the first go-round in 12.1 worth $1,203.64 and then put a second go-round (non-money winning effort) time of 13.1 to get the average in 25.2.

 

Rod Hartness was the second go-round winner in 10.9. Those second go-round times all came in between 10.9 and 12.5, indicating the second time through found cowboys knowing just how to turn the trick.

 

Some of the better steer wrestling times were in the 4.1 to 5.7 range. Calf ropers had it a little longer on the arena floor with times generally from 9.8 to 16.3.

 

The rodeo gets off to a bull riding, saddle bronc riding, bareback riding and all the other action tonight.

 

Thursday night, a barbecue has been set at the Moose Lodge, with those invited needing to have a Thursday night advanced ticket to the rodeo. Head Country BBQ Restaurant, United Supermarket and Farha Wholesale sponsor the event.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo parade is set for 10 a.m. Saturday, and will head east along Grand Avenue from Oak Street to Sixth Street.

Exciting Rides Way To Open Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

 

Just leave it up to the cowboys coming out of the chutes on rough-stock to give rodeo fans at the 101 Wild West Rodeo some-thing to yell about and applaud.

 

In the opening event of the rodeo Wednesday night, the bare-back ride by Troy Thomson of Westlake, Texas, had the crowd looking for a real show. Thomson was last out of the chutes in the event. A 75 had been posted by Dusty McCollister of Acworth, Ga., and a 73 by Bubba Miller of Woodville, Texas. What did Thomson do? He and Wily Cat of the Rumford Rodeo Company stock put on a show that was worth an 83. What a way to start a rodeo!

 

Although there were good times in the timed events, none could get into the posted times of slack performances of Tuesday night.

Except for the girls barrel racers! No less than six matched or bettered the 18.69 posted Tuesday night by Lori Sanders, and expectations are that the present 18.37 by Tracy Hoffman of Collinsville may not hold up.

 

Hoffman got the 18.37 on the last "official" entry, although there were three other young cuties trying their hand at getting that horse of theirs around the barrels. It was a crowd pleaser-plus, and made for some exciting times by those young, not past single digits, upcoming barrel racers.

 

Hoffman's 18.37 also bested the next-to-last run in the 'official' event, that of Penny Deboer, Andover, Kan., at 18.44. Earlier, Nancy Powell of Kinta had posted 18.54.

 

Not surprisingly, bull riders gave the crowd quite a thrill and something to beat in the next three nights of rodeoing. Francis Wilson of Sidney, Neb., got a 79 to get into the top spot of the bull riders. There was a 76 that he bested by Bobby Lee O'Donnell, Owasso and a pair of 72s.

 

Saddle bronc riders had a tough go, with only two posting actual rides. Butch Braden Jr. of Welch had a 70 and Jeff Roberts of El Dorado, Kan., had a 64. Those likely will go under in the next three nights.

 

Steer wrestlers finished off the first go-round Wednesday, and the remainder of the three nights will include second go-round scores. Best in the first go-round were 4.1s posted by Blake Bailey and G.V. Gulager, each on Tuesday night, and worth $765.94 each. Third and fourth were also split between Bill Mouser and Bran- don Turney, each with 4.3s, for $328.26 each. Best on Wednesday night was a 5.0 by Guy Grimes of Copan while Opie Lawson of Edmond turned his steer over in 5.8.

 

Joe Day of Howe, Texas and Boogie Ray of Rockwall, Texas, combined in the team roping on Tuesday to post a 6.5 for the lead, while two Oklahoma cowboys, Justin R. Johnson of Pawhuska and Shannon L. Frascht of Burlington, combined for a 6.8.

 

Two South Dakota ropers, Jay Mattson of Deadwood and Joe B. f Martin of Newell, had thrilled the early crowd with a 6.2, until it was determined they only got one of the two hind legs, and were ready to settle for an 11.2. Then it was also determined they broke the barrier at the gate and had to go with a 21.2.

 

Calf ropers were also unable to k beat a Tuesday slack time of 9.8 by Ross W. Dotson of Pryor. Two were slightly more than a second slower, when both Marty Jones of Hobbs, N.M., and Troy Amoss of Albia, Iowa, each posted 11.2.

 

Rodeo fans can look forward to some similar thrills all three nights that remain, with action starting with the grand entry at 8 p.m. in the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena. Prior to the main grand entry each night will be a 'stick horse grand entry' for the first 101 youngsters arriving at the rodeo grounds. That occurs at 7:45 p.m., and was an exciting event for parents and grandparents, to say the least on Wednesday!

 

Tonight, fans with advanced Thursday night tickets have the opportunity to eat barbecue at the Moose Lodge, just across the street to the east of the rodeo grounds at Ash Street and Prospect Avenue. That begins at 6 p.m., and is sponsored by Head Country BBQ Restaurant, United Supermarkets and Farha Whole-sale. Extra donations will go to Domestic Violence.

 

Remember, on Saturday, at 10 a.m., there's the downtown 101 Wild West Rodeo parade. It begins at Oak Street and West Grand Avenue and heads east to Sixth Street along Grand Avenue.

Dry Arena Helps Scoring As Rodeo Enters Weekend

 

What a difference a dry day makes.

 

Opening night Wednesday at the 101 Wild West Rodeo on the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena grounds produced some good times on a rather slow and heavy footing.


Thursday it was entirely different. For the cowboys and cow- girls, and the Rumford Rodeo Company stock, as well.

 

The rodeo continues at 8 p.m. tonight, with a final night on Saturday, also at 8 p.m.

 

Prior to the Saturday performance the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade will be held in downtown Ponca City starting at 10 a.m. from Oak Street at West Grand Avenue, heading east and concluding at Sixth Street.

 

Also on tap Saturday at 7:30 p.m. in the arena," will be the coronation ceremonies of the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen. Six contestants are vying for the honors, including Rebecca Cherry, Lacey Dale Cully, Carrie Markley, Krystal Martin, Lindsey R. Shelton and Christy Dawn Simmons.

 

An added attraction tonight and Saturday will be the appearance of the Red River Riders of Clarksville, Texas, a precision drill team on horseback.

 

The ground conditions for the contestants and stock proved to be just right on Thursday night. Cowgirls obviously enjoyed the quicker track, as times in the girls barrel racing dipped below the 18-second barrier on two occasions and created some shuffling in the standings.

 

Former National Finals Rodeo contestant Kim West of Oklahoma City proved to be the quickest on a black and white horse that knew just the right speed and turn ability from her reins, as she sped through the clover-leaf barrels in 17.75. That was a good 62-hundredths of a second better than Wednesday night's best.

 

Tracy Hoffman of Collinsville had posted an.lS.37 on Wednesday .-'to take the lead after Penny Deboer of Andover, Kan., had put an 18.44 on the books. Lori Sanders had an 18.69 during Tuesday night's slack.

 

But West showed the way with the 17.75 on Thursday, and that came after a Liberal, Kan., cowgirl, Brandee Newman had posted a 17.98 to indicate the faster track on the first ride of the night. Then, a 17.92 was posted by Teal Rice of Lakin, Kan., but she had to take a 5-second penalty when one of the barrels was tipped over during the ride.

 

Kiowa, Okla., calf roper Billy Hamilton didn't let that calf get very far out of the chute in posting a 9.8 time. to tie him with the lead in that event with Ross Dotson of Pryor, who had that time during Tuesday's slack.

 

Gail L. Turner of Lawton also pulled into the quick times with a 10.5 for third spot at the present time, while Doug Hazelbaker of Redfield, Kan., had an 11.1 which puts him at sixth.

 

The team roping saw some exciting situations, when Joe Day of Howe, Texas and Boogie Ray of Rockwall, Texas, turned the trick at 7.4, to go with an earlier 6.5 for the lead in 13.9. That may very well withstand all other comers.

 

The crowd got a real enjoyment out of seeing Stockton Graves of Ponca City get a 4.9 time in the steer wrestling, best during the regular performance Thursday. Gary P. Dowling of Porum, Okla., had a 6.5 and Terry Lawson of Cashion had a 7.6.

 

Slack after the Thursday run found Rex Meier get a 3.5, Glen dark with a 3.7, Sam Duvall at 4.1 and two at 4.2, including Jason Lahr and G.V. Gulager, who is from Tahlequah. Gulager had posted a 4.1 earlier and now leads the two go-rounds, at 8.3 ahead of Blake Bailey, 8.6; Rex Meier, 8.7 and Brandon Turney, 8.8.

 

Bareback riders were unable to top the 83 turned in Wednesday by Troy Thomson of Westlake, Texas, but nonetheless, posted good scores. Tops on Thursday was a 76 by Chuck Logue of Decatur, Texas.

 

A re-ride in the saddle bronc competition after all the performances Thursday found Billy Dimmitt of Burwell, Neb., posting a 76. Dimmitt got the re-ride as a result of his bucking horse rearing too far back and falling. The ride ties him with Lance Gaillard, Texhoma, Okla., who earlier had posted a 76. Todd L. Leftwich of Burden, Kan., had a 73 and all three scores were better than Wednesday's 70 by Butch Braden Jr. of Welch.

 

The bull riders also were unable to match the 79 posted Wednesday by Francis Wilson, Sidney, Neb. Best of the night Thursday was a 76 by Don Ray Howard of Pampa to go into a second-place tie with Bobby Lee O'Donnell of Owasso.

Rodeo Performers Display Top Form

 

World barrel racing  champion Kristie Peterson of Elbert, Colo., and her world champion horse Bozo showed off for Friday's 101 Wild West Rodeo crowd.

 

And Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger, who a week ago won $7,600 as the champion at the Dodge City, Kan., rodeo and moved into the top 15 of the calf roping, displayed the form that may very well take him to the National Finals Rodeo.

 

Schneeberger, although his time was 15.9, took first in the Friday night calf roping and was able to have the crowd cheer him in the winner's ride. It wasn't an easy effort, as Schneeberger drew a calf that literally wanted no part of the act and zoomed out of the chute prior to Schneeberger's catch in the center of the arena. And, the contrary calf also made it even tougher on the tie. But Schneeberger took care of business to the delight of the crowd.

 

Meanwhile, with rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid, who also is a world class announcer, encouraging the crowd to "cheer her on," Peterson knocked more than a full second off Tuesday's best in barrel racing. That was 18.69 by Lori Sanders.

 

Peterson also had just witnessed, as did the crowd, a second 17.75 turned in for top money in the barrel racing event when Sarah Zaieski of Blanchard, Okla., was the second to ride in the event on Friday. That tied a Thursday performance of Oklahoma City's Kim West, yet another National Finals Rodeo performer, who had bumped Wednesday's best of 18.37 by Tracy Hoffman of Collinsville.

 

But when Peterson entered the arena riding Bozo, and they turned that first barrel, almost everybody at the rodeo sensed that this was going to be a new leader. She slipped around the right-turn bar-rel on the east, flew to the west where the natural left-hand turn by Bozo sent her streaking to the far end of the arena and then to the finish in 17.44. That's .31 of a second faster than Zaieski and West.

 

But the crowd had some more to cheer about, when Lynda Gordon ofGuthrie dipped under those two scores also, with 17.67 as did Trula Truitt of Mounds, Okla., with a 17.64. Going into the Saturday finals Peterson was in first, fol-lowed by Gordon and Truitt.

 

Girls' barrel racing didn't steal all of the thunder on a clear, star-filled Friday night at the rodeo. Justin Howard of Hennessey really showed off in the saddle bronc event with an 81. That pushed him well up over a 76 scored by Billy Dimmitt of Burwell, Neb. and Lance Gaillard of Texhoma, that were scored on Thursday night.

 

But the crowd had hardly got settled from the grand entry and opening ceremonies when the bareback event came up with what the rodeo was going to be like on Friday night.

 

In the bareback, the first out of the chute on Red River Skoal was Kent-T. Crouch of Leoti, Kan., and he popped; all eyes wide open with a ride of 84. That put him just a notch above the 83 by Troy Thomson of Westlake, Texas, on Wednesday. Then, Payne L Dobler of Andover, Kan., rode for a 78 to leap into third place.

 

In the calf roping, Schneeberger had to go under 16 in order to win Friday, and he did. Prior to his effort, De Lynn Jones of Hobbs, N.M.., had a 16.2 and two  others would have been in the top money, had it not been for getting caught trying to leave a little early from their posts. Both had to take a 10-second penalty on times of 13.6 and 14.7.

 

Best in the calf roping are a pair of 9.8s. Ross Dotson did it early on Tuesday, while Billy Hamilton did it Thursday. Next down the list are Gail Turner at 10.5. Marty Miller at 10.6 and Tony Reina at 10.9.

 

Wednesday night's leader in the bull riding, Francis Wilson of Sidney, Neb., remained on top with his 79. The Rumford Rodeo Company stock proved worthy in this event, as it has in all of them, when no less than six of the 10 bull riders making it to the rodeo on Thursday being dumped, most of whom were done so not so ceremoniously.

 

Best ride Friday was a 73 by Jared Kelber of Des Moines, Iowa. Don Ray Howard of Pampa, Texas, and Bobby Lee O'Donnell of Owasso each got a 76 earlier in the rodeo for present second place money, followed by a 74 from Danell Earl Tipton. Kelber's 73 ties him with Thad Bothwell for fifth. Whether any of that stands, was to be decided later Saturday night.

 

From 31 teams in the team roping contest. 6.3 leads the second go and none could match that Friday night. Best were Hunter Herrin and Steve Orth with a 6.5, but they had to take a 5-second penalty when the heeler caught just one hind leg of the steer. That gave them an 11.5. Jim D. Davis, formerly of Ponca City, and now of Abilene, Texas, and team roping companion J. Paul Williams of Ponca City. had a 13.1.

 

Joe B. Day and Ray Boogie continue to lead the two-go scores with a 13.9, followed by Tom Self and John P. Coughran. at 20.8.

 

The popular steer wrestling event entered the third night of competition with Teddy Johnson of Checotah posting the best of the night at 5.7. Since there was no special event held Monday, contestants lined up for four go-rounds in the event and were to conclude that with slack after Saturday night's regular rodeo performance.

 

Jack Bradshaw has the best aver-age on three steers so far, at 25.6 followed by Guy Grimes at 26.1.

 

During Friday's slack, there were some tremendous times, with three, including Brandon Turney. Tom W. White and Bill Mouser, each getting a 3.3. They split third go-round championship money amounting to $656.52 each, with fourth going to Stewart Gulager in 3.8 worth $218.84.

Honorary Grand Marshal Misses Parade

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo parade had to contend with a couple of trains and some slight gaps Saturday morning, but all-in-all, it was a rather nice, slow-moving parade.

 

There was one sad note however.

 

Parade marshal Floyd Rumford, named as such a few weeks ago by the Ponca City Rodeo Association, was unable to make the trip from his home to enjoy the honor.


Floyd suffered a stroke in early April; and along with other complications, his recovery has been steady but somewhat slow. "We had hoped he would be able to be here Friday and Saturday, but he had to take it easy Thursday after some therapy on Wednesday," said son Bronc Rumford.

 

Bronc Rumford took Floyd's place in the parade marshal seat, but few people realized the situation involving the popular Floyd and Lola Rumford family as they pre-pared for this year's season. The two celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on March 23. just slightly more than a week prior to Floyd having his stroke.

 

Bronc has taken over the main strain of rodeo producing, and still gets time to compete in some of the events on occasion. He and his wife Kate whom he married about three years ago, have been instrumental in keeping the Rumford Rodeo Company going.

 

They've had help, and there's no reason for the Rumford Rodeo Company not to continue producing stock for rodeos, and getting some into the National Finals Rodeo just like years before.

 

But Saturday's parade could have been too much for Floyd to handle at the present time, with not much of a breeze and temperatures already heading upward from a morning low of high 70 readings.

 

There was a nice crowd lining the streets. The City of Ponca City was  represented officially by Mayor Marilyn Andrews in the first vehicle in the parade, right behind the color guard and Parade Marshal Bronc Rumford.

 

That's not saying that the rest of the parade didn't have any Ponca City attractions, for there were many and the parade was a good one that included Po-Hi Steppers, some Kay County officials, Ponca City. Noon Lions, O'Reilly Auto Parts, (with several vehicles), Asbury Methodist Church Youth, Cub Scouts, Country General, Rock N Country Dance Club, Oklahoma Ranch Supply, and Marland Round Up and Braman Saddle Club, plus Ponca City Rodeo Association and Rumford Rodeo Company riders.

 

There were the Red River Riders from Clarksville, Texas, precision drill team on horseback.

 

Fire stations providing units included Tonkawa, Marland and Osage Cove (with three units).

 

The Akdar Shriners from Tulsa provided a good share of the parade, including little cars, three-wheeler drill teams, motorcycle drill unit, and several other vehicles.

101 Rodeo Crowd Sees Hot Times, Top Scores

 

Obviously the biggest crowd of the 1997 edition of the 101 Wild West Rodeo watched the curtain drop on the final performance Saturday night at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena, but not before some really exciting efforts.

 

One in particular, came in the girls' barrel racing, when an Emporia, Kan., gal and her horse bumped world barrel racing champion Kristie Peterson of Elbert, Colo.. from her top spot to claim the 101 Wild West Rodeo championship.

 

Peterson had clipped more than .3 of a second from previous scores turned in the first three performances with a sizzling 17.44 on Friday night, but Saturday it was Karin M. Henry of Emporia, turning the trick in 17.43. That's top money folks, by a scant .01 of a second. And it was worth $1,115.49 compared to Peterson's second place, $998.07, out of the $5,871 paid off from the Rumford Rodeo Company in producing the rodeo.

 

Total money paid out by the end of Saturday's performance by rodeo officials came to $64,278.45.

 

Other Saturday performers got into the top 10 of the barrels, with Terry Hughes of Barnsdall claiming third with 17.58 for $880.65 and Susan Clapp, also of Barnsdall, eighth in 17.87 for $293.55. By the time the curtain dropped, the first nine in barrels had eclipsed the 18-second barrier, while Mary Burger of Elmore City, Okla., had an 18.02 on Saturday for 10th and $58.71.

 

The remainder of the barrel racers in the money, included Trula Truitt, Mounds, fourth, 17.64 for $763.23: Lynda Gordon, Guthrie. fifth, 17.66 for $645.81; Kim West of Oklahoma City, and Sara Zaieski of Blanchard, sharing sixth and seventh, for $469.68 on times of 17.75 and Brandee Newman of Liberal, Kan., with a 17.98 for ninth. $176.13.

 

The calf roping title also was won on Saturday night, when Kacee Williams of Warner. Okla., claimed a time of 9.6 for $1,798.54. The two-tenths of a second quicker time kept him from sharing , first place money with two others at 9.8, Ross Dot-: son, Pryor and Billy Hamilton, Kiowa. They got $1,446.65 apiece.

 

Other payoffs in calf roping went to Gail Turner, Lawton, fourth in 10.5 for $1,094.76; Marty Miller, , fifth in 10.6, $860.17; Tony Reina, sixth, 10.9 for i $625,58; Doug Hazelbaker, Redford, Kan., seventh in 11.1 for $390.98 and split for eighth money, Marty Jones of Hobbs, N.M., and Troy Amos, Albia, Iowa, in 11.2 for $78.19 each.

 

Winner of the fourth go-round in steer wrestling, decided all on Saturday, went to Marty Musil of Crescent, in 3.4, worth $875.36. Three others split ; second, third and fourth, for $437.68 each. They were Stewart Gulager, Tahlequah; Jeff Babek, Granite, and Doug Janke, with times of 3.8.

 

Best of the four go-rounds was Rex Meier, with ; 17.5 (that's less than five seconds average on each steer) for $1,750.72. In the closely contested four go-rounds, Bill Mouser of Wyandotte followed in 17.8 for $1,313.04; Brandon Turney of Checotah was next in 17.9 for $875.36 and Blake Bailey was fourth, 18.4, for $437.68.

 

Saturday's best in bareback riding were a pair of 77s, and that put them in a tie for fourth, each worth $413.44. They were Justin Lindquist of Brookville, Kan., and D.J. Johnson, of Hutchinson. Remaining on top with his Friday effort was , Kent Crouch, Leoti, Kan., with an 84, worth , $1,436.16. Second came Troy Thomson, Westlake, Texas, with an 83 for $1,088. Third was Payne Dobler of Andover, Kan., with a 78 for $783.36 while sixth went to Chuck Logue, Decatur. Texas, on a 76 for $217.60.

 

Best team ropers on Saturday were Foreman Mader of Tulsa and Jeff L. Carney of Sperry, who got the two-rope job done in 6.4. That was worth $370.37 each for second money in the second go-round finish. Jerry Buckles of Kearney, Neb. and Kurt Hall of Hugoton, Kan., had earlier in the week got a 6.3 in the second go-round for first place money of $493.83 each. Joe B. Day of Howe. Texas, and partner Boogie Ray of Rockwell, Texas, had a 7.4 in the second for $246.91 each and they claimed the overall title on two go-rounds, in 13.9 after a first go-round victory of 6.5. The two go-round win was also worth $493.83 each.

 

Fourth in the second go-round was the South Dakota team of Jay Mattson, Deadwood and Joe B. Marti. Newell, in 10.7 for $123.45 each.

 

Second to Day and Ray in the two go-rounds were Tom Self, Carrollton, Texas, and John P. Coughran. Edmond, with a 20.8 for $370.37 each; followed in third by Richard Lehew, Oakwood. Okla., and Rich Oiler, Enid, 23.4 for $246.91 each and Jim D. Davis, Abilene. Texas, and J. Paul Williams, Ponca City, in 26.3 for $123.45 apiece.

 

Tops in the saddle bronc efforts Saturday night went to an 80 turned in by Clay Wilson, Afton, Okla., for second money at $966.75 and Todd Hipsag of Brookings, S.D., with a 73 to tie Todd Leftwich of Burden, Kan., for fifth to split $464.04 ($232.02 each).

 

Justin Howard of Hennessey had an 81 score on Friday and was able to claim first place money in saddle bronc riding, worth $1,276.11. Two other riders, both on Thursday, claimed $580.05 each with 76 scores. They were Lance Gaillard, Texhoma, Okla., and Billy Dimmitt, Burwell, Neb.

 

In the bull riding scramble, rides of 77 by Chris Littlejohn, Sapulpa; 76 by Lee Akin, Weatherford, and 75 by Josh Pierce, Terrell, Texas, on Saturday moved them into the money. Littlejohn was second for $1,393.61; Akin had one of three 76s in third place for $706.90 and Pierce was sixth for $302.96.

 

Tops in the bull riding came on a 79 Wednesday night by Francis Wilson of Sidney, Neb., eventually worth $1,817.76. The other two third places went to Bobby Lee O'Donnell of Owasso and Don Ray Howard of Pampa. Texas. In with a 74 for seventh was Danell Earl Tipton of Spencer, Okla., worth $242.36 and getting a pair of 73s to tie for eighth were Thad Bothwell, Fort Pierce, S.D., and Jared Kelber, Des Moines. Iowa. each getting $90.88.

 

Crowd pleasing efforts every night in the girls barrel racing were a couple of very young riders, Kate Beaty, 4-year-old daughter of Brad and Tina Beaty, and Shelby Carpenter, 3-year-old daughter of Sonny and Robin Carpenter.  Saturday night was their closest finishes in 38.48 and 37.51 respectively. The two head to other rodeos in the area, according to announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid, who continued his chatter throughout the rodeo with information and keeping the crowd awaiting the next event.

 

Also having a big hand in making the rodeo seem to go faster each night, were Gary Parli, barrel man and clown; Mike Johnson and Kevin Rich, both bull fighters and clowns.

 

The Red River Riders of Clarksville, Texas, also per- formed the last two nights of the rodeo, and the crowd was treated each night to two mini-chuckwagon races.

 

Special Friends of the Rodeo awards were made to Rodeo enthusiasts Darrel Dye and Danny Head, along with special awards to two Ponca City Rodeo Foundation officials. President Brad Beaty and Arena Director Rick Barnthouse. It was Beaty and Barnthouse who spearheaded the grooming of the arena and making some interesting and very worthy changes that included a new press box, and additional space for chute heavens.

 

Johnny Heinze, with a fine reading. and the Saturday crowd paid tribute to the late Buck LeGrand, former Ponca Citian and National Finals Rodeo clown, who died within the past year.

 

The Saturday crowd also saw the coronation ceremonies that named Lacey Dale Cully of Shidler as the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen, to reign until the 39th rodeo next August.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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