1999

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

Website will be updated as information becomes available.

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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WATCH HERE FOR A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 1999

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 18th, 19th, 20th, & 21st

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Barry Burk
RODEO QUEEN: Megan Schneeberger SPECIALTY ACT: Leon & Vicki Adams

101 Wild West Rodeo Set For August 18-21

 

On a wave of heat, muscle and Oklahoma dust the 101 Wild West Rodeo promises four days of boot-stompin', live-action rodeo excitement beginning Wednesday, August 18 through Saturday, August 21.

 

The full four nights marks the 40th anniversary of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association 101 Wild West Rodeo, complete this year with an exciting temporary addition to the arena — a Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo scoreboard.

 

The scoreboard will be a dynamic, interactive display of information to the crowd about the current arena event, rodeo participant and other rodeo information.

 

Livestock has been contracted once again from the Rafter H Livestock company, Dell Hal owner.

 

Besides the six regular PRCA events of bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, bull riding and team roping, the 101 Wild West Rodeo will have barrel racing.

 

There will be specialty acts per formed by the team of Vicki am Leon Adams every night high lighting their Roman and trick riding specialties. Special activities are planned for the young rodeo fan with prizes each night.

 

Additionally, prior to each evening's performance the Stick Horse Grand Entry features the first 101 kids arrived circling the arena on shiny, new stick horses which participants take home after the event.

 

Barrel man this year is Scot Cameron assisted by bullfighter; Kevin Rich and Mike Johnson.

 

On Saturday morning at 10 a.m. a Rodeo Parade will march down the street of Grand Avenue featuring local and area wild west entertainment. For more parade information contact Linda Maul at 765-8864 or 762-0406.

 

Another special event is the naming of the 101 Wild Wes Rodeo Queen on Saturday nigh following a full week of activity for the contestants.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation has just one goal in mind — putting on a great rodeo. Don' miss this year's 40th turf-pounding, gut-churning, rope-slinging excitement.

Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo Scoreboard Will Appear At 101 Wild West Rodeo

 

Four semi-rigs, five operators, over 120,000 miles per year, eight computers, thousands of yards of cables, radio units, timing boxes, electric eyes, nearly 900 days of travel, and 120 events — it all adds up to the Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo Scoreboard Program.

 

A scoreboard will be utilized at the 1999 101 Wild West Rodeo, Aug. 18-21. Ponca City's rodeo is one of approximately 100 to utilize a Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo scoreboard and all that is necessary to transport, hang and operate the unit.

 

"We know how difficult it can be to keep up with all of the rodeo action," said Darrell Barron, Western Manufacturing Promotions Manager for United States Tobacco Sales and Marketing Company Inc. "Most major sporting events have some kind of scoreboard and we felt a rodeo scoreboard would be a real asset. The program has been very successful and has benefited communities, spectators and everyone involved with an event."

 

Providing those benefits is no small feat. A scoreboard schedule is compiled each year and the logistics of transporting the boards to over 110 different locations must be considered. Assigning one of the five operators to events and working with local committees becomes the next task.

 

The operators must get contestant information from the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association's central entry office. They work with committees to give sponsors, proper recognition and are completely responsible for transporting, setting up and operating the board.

 

When they arrive at a rodeo, they look at the arena, the planned location for the board and prepare to set up. Two computers are used to run each board and while everything is in the trailer the operator hooks up the equipment and runs his first test. Sponsor panels which have been removed for transportation are placed on both ends of the board and the top.

 

After the board is assembled and all of the equipment is checked out, the board is moved out of the semi trailer onto a portable trailer and moved to the hanging area. Based on where the board will be placed during the rodeo, a crane or chain motors are used to lift the board up. It is then secured with cables and chains.

 

A signal cable is run from the board to the computers used to run it. Cables are also run to a monitor for the rodeo's announcer and to equipment used by the official timers. Electric eyes used to time the women's barrel race are integrated into the system. Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo operators are then ready to program individual committee information into their computers such as sponsors and specialty acts.

 

Prior to the rodeo each operator checks with the rodeo secretary to make sure all of the contestant information is correct. During the rodeo, assistants in the arena use radios to communicate pertinent information to the operators which s then placed on the score-board. All of the rodeo personnel work together to ensure the spectators are provided with accurate information in a timely manner.

 

"When we started this program nine years ago, we worked with the scoreboard manufacturers to develop board and programs to bring all of the many elements together at a rodeo," Barren said. "This has been our most popular rodeo program and it has grown tremendously. We're very proud to be able to bring a scoreboard to the 101 Wild West Rodeo and are convinced it will make keeping up with all the rodeo action much easier."

 

With computer graphics, operators that are knowledgeable about rodeo, state of the art technology, the Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo scoreboards are designed to help everyone keep up with all of the activity at a rodeo. Spectators, personnel and contestants in Ponca City will be referring to the scoreboard throughout the rodeo to keep up with leaders, times and scores.

101 Wild West Rodeo Parade Saturday Will Begin At Oak And Grand Avenue

 

Final arrangements for the 1999 101 Wild West Rodeo parade are falling into place, according to Rodeo Foundation officials.

 

The parade will start promptly at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 21, beginning at West Grand Avenue and Oak Street and heading east along Grand Avenue ending at Sixth Street.

 

The parade marshal this year is Barry Burk, area high school student who placed first in the state in calf roping at the Oklahoma high school championships.

 

Pre-entry is not necessary for the parade this year, according to Chris Short and Larry Goodno, who are in charge of sending entries on their way as the parade heads east. However, they ask that participants be ready for the lineup at 9:30 a.m.

 

Prior to the parade in that! immediate area, will be a pan-g cake breakfast offered by the Masons at the Masonic Lodge on West Grand Avenue, starting at 6:30 a.m. The public is invited.

 

Floats are requested to meet on the side streets in front of West Grand Church of Christ and progress east. Those riding horses and having horse or animal drawn wagons and carriages should meet in the grassy area south of the church, and be able to produce a Coggins test on request.

 

Classic car entries are to meet on North Peachtree and North Birch, but are requested not to block driveways of residences. Political candidates and participants should be gathering on side streets and in the Lake Street area, and parade officials have asked that for the safety of the youngsters, that participants do not throw candy.

 

For additional information concerning the parade, contact Short at 762-9649.

Youngsters Can Enjoy Stick Horse Grand Entry at 101

 

Every night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo the activity will begin with a Stick Horse Grand Entry.

 

That's at 7:45 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, when youngsters will be called to a specific area to obtain stick horses that they will get keep after riding in the Stick Horse Grand Entry.

 

The first 101 youngsters getting to that specific area will be able to participate, and as the week grows, the activity grows since all youngsters that had performed earlier may bring their stick horse back and join the Stick Horse Grand Entry again.

 

So just get there a little early order to get your stick horse.

101 Beverage, 101 West West Rodeo Sponsor All-Amateur Team Roping

ADMIRING ONE of two saddles to be given away to the winning team in the new All-Amateur Team Roping event during the 101 Wild West Rodeo is (left to right) Keith Quiram, Donna Jeffries White with 101 Beverage Co., and Robin Carpenter, 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation.

 

The 40th anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo will include a debut event for the local cowboy — team roping for the non-professional.

 

According to Brad Beaty, 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation President, "This new event is a way to include the local cowboys in the Ponca City area in the 101 Wild West Rodeo. There are many talented working cowboys in our area that do not get a chance at rodeo competition. This event will provide them that chance."

 

Sponsored by 101 Beverage, each member of the winning roping team wins a Budweiser Saddle. Additionally cash prizes will also be award-ed to the top four teams on two head.

 

Rules for this event are:

First 24 teams only.
 
Call in entries to Rodeo Ticket Office (580) 765-2980, August 11, 1999, 7:00-9:00 p.m. only.
 
Order of phone call determines night of participation.
 
$100 entry fee per team.
 
All entry fees due by Monday, August 16, 1999 by 5:00 p.m. at the Rodeo Office.
 
Must have proof of age and residence.
 
Enter one time only.
 
Must live within 60 mile radius of Ponca City.
 
Must be 21 years of age or older
 
Must not have PRCA card or permit.
 
Must wear western attire: boots, long sleeve shirt, hat (no ball caps).
 
Eight teams participate each night: Wednesday, Thursday, Friday.
 
Top eight teams from 24 teams come back on Saturday night.
 
Each member of the winning team wins a Budweiser Saddle.
 
Cash prizes will also be awarded to the top four teams on two head.
 
NO STOCK CHARGE.
The 101 Wild West Rodeo is slated for August 18-21, beginning at 8 p.m. each night. For more information about this all-amateur team roping and the 101 Wild West Rodeo call the Rodeo office at (580) 765-2980

Special Act For 101 Wild West Rodeo Best In 1997

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo win have another thrill in the arena to keep fans in the seats and cheering when a Specialty Act that has won Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association titles as recently as 1997.

 

That will be the efforts of Leon and Vicki Adams, who have a number of tricks up their sleeves that may include roman riding horses, dancing horses, or flame-hoop jumping bulls.

 

Leon Adams was born and reared at Stuart, Okla., a small farming and ranching community with a population of 400, about 20 miles west of McAlester. He was not raised in a rodeo family and they tried to discourage him from participating. When his dad would go to the pasture he never knew whether he would find Leon unconscious from some of his amateur activities.

 

Leon learned to roman ride horses by riding his dad's work horses to and from the field each day. He attended the every Sunday goat ropings where two men from a large town nearby saw him riding the two horses, and hired him for their rodeo. He was 12 years old then, performing bareback and barefooted for all three performances. At the end of the rodeo they paid him $15 dollars, which not only made him "rich" but also made him a "star." He decided then and there on a career other than farming. He performed at small town rodeos near home for a couple of years. When he was 14 years old he had to make a tough decision on whether to join a circus that came through, they saw him perform and offered him a contract on the spot. Due to his age and family influence, Leon decided to finish high school for which he is very proud of.

 

Leon's roman riding career grew, rodeo bookings increased and were farther and farther from Stuart which required him to hire local trucks to handle his gear and horses, until he was able to provide for himself. Larger rodeos were booked and in order to entertain larger audiences he knew he must expand his act and come up with something different and unusual. That something became Geronimo and Apache, the only act in the world of it's kind. He joined the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in 1964. As a member of the PRCA, Leon has been booked at most of the biggest and best rodeos in the United States and Canada.

 

Leon married Vicki, a professional horseman, trick rider, roman rider and of Indian descent from the state of Washington. Vicki was an alternate Miss Indian America representing her mother's tribe, the Yakima nation, making up of 13 bands and tribes. During her youth she helped her dad ranch and run cattle on the Cascades. They were a rodeo family, s6 they were behind her in her rodeo career. She was the North West Indian barrel racing champion for many years. Her dad picking the horses for her and her mother would assist in the barrel training. Her dad was a champion All Around Cowboy.

 

Vicki always had a dream of being a famous performer. Her dreams have come true. She and Leon have won Specialty Acts of the year from the PRCA between them four times, the latest being in 1997.

 

Vicki has performed her horses in Mt. Aso, Japan; Helsinki, Fin-land; and Paris, France. Her dancing horses performed in the movie "Buffalo Girls."

 

Leon and Vicki now work as a team at the ranch and in the arena. In their off season they are busy training new stock to keep their acts fresh. Together they have performed a variety of acts. They had a Brahma that jumped an El Dorado Cadillac Convertible. They have performed double roman riding acts with two teams, switching teams at a run ... they work together training the famous performance horses, that walk great distances on their hind legs. One Little Indian, Indian Two, Silverado, Indian Three for a back-up, and now they have started another paint, which will probably be another "Indian." Also Leon has the Flying Aces; a six up tandem roman riding team. Leon has also trained Cherokee Smoke, a little paint that does a variety of tricks on a line and then jumps through a fire hoop to the cab of the truck and then presents a Hag before dismounting. Cherokee Smoke is loved by everyone.

 

Leon did stunt riding and played an extra in the Rock Island Trail movie. He also leased horses to them. Leon has trained brahmas for the filming of the Last Flight of Noah's Ark, a Disney film. He sent several trick riding, roman riding, drill, contests horses with the All American Wild West Shows overseas. All of the animals were trained on the LA Ranch. He's trained contest horses, roping, steer wrestling horses that have been to the NFR many times, mounting the World's best steer wrestlers, and hazing for them. He also helped tutor and helped a friends daughter make it to the NFR barrel race. He likes to be able to help people reach their potential.

 

They have trained and sold many successful barrel racing horses. Vicki has always had the love of training barrel horses, but with her showing career she never had the opportunity to campaign on the WPRA circuit. She believes to be a winner you have to live and breath your chosen field to the extreme forsaking all other  activities.

 

They have no desire of retiring. The lord will tell them ..when it's time. In the meantime, they put their trust and faith in him to help them to continue being successful and stay in good health, so they are ready to please the audiences. Just open the gate!

Reigning Queen Has Busy Year

The reigning Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen 1999 is Stormi Guidry from Gushing. She is the 15-year-old daughter of Sharon Crissey. Stormi is a 10th grade honor student at Cushing High School.


While in her freshman year, Stormi received Principals honor roll, honor roll, and Varsity Scholar. She is in the Spanish Club, Science Club, and a member of the track and field team. Stormi was also in National Junior Honor Society.

 

Stormy is a member of the ApHC (Appaloosa Horse Club), Texas Appaloosa Horse Club, Oklahoma Appaloosa Club. She is a very active member in Oklahoma 4-H, winning titles such as North East District Speech Champion , Reserve State 4-H Champion Barrel Racer, Reserve State Champion Pole Bender, and qualifier for 4-H Southern Regional horse show.

 

Riding horses since the age of 2 has led Stormi to becoming very competitive in horse shows, play days, rodeos, and horse judging. She has also shown, steers, chickens, a pig, a bull, and heifers through 4-H. Most of all, Stormi loves Rodeo Queen contests. Since last year she has won Miss Rodeo Braman, Miss Springdale Jr. Rodeo, Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo, Miss Cherokee Strip Stampede Princess, and Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen 1999.

 

At the Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Pageant she was also awarded the Governor's Speech Award for her speech on her home town of Cushing. She also won the horsemanship divisions at these pageants.

 

During the past year, Stormi has traveled all over the state of Oklahoma and neighboring states promoting the great sport of rodeo and Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen.

Cope Skoal Rodeo Scoreboard Here

 

Four semi-rigs, five operators, over 120,000 miles per year, eight computers, thousands of yards of cables, radio units, timing boxes, electric eyes, nearly 900 days of travel, and 120 events — it all adds up to the Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo Scoreboard Program.

 

A scoreboard will be utilized at the 1999 101 Wild West Rodeo, Aug. 18-21. Ponca City's rodeo is one of approximately 100 to utilize a Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo scoreboard and all that is necessary to transport, hang and operate the unit.

 

"We know how difficult it can be to keep up with all of the rodeo action,'' said Darrell Barren, Western Manufacturing Promotions Manager for United States Tobacco Sales and Marketing Company Inc. "Most major sporting events have some kind of scoreboard and we felt a rodeo scoreboard would be a real asset. The program has been very successful and has benefited communities, spectators and everyone involved with an event."

 

Providing those benefits is no small feat. A scoreboard schedule is compiled each year and the logistics of transporting the boards to over 110 different locations must be considered. Assigning one of the five operators to events and working with local committees becomes the next task.

 

The operators must get contestant information from the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association's central entry office. They work with committees to give sponsors proper recognition and are completely responsible for trans-porting, setting up and operating the board.

 

When they arrive at a rodeo, they look at the arena, the planned location for the board and prepare to set up. Two computers are used to run each board and white everything is in the trailer the operator hooks up the equipment and runs his first test. Sponsor panels which have been removed for transportation are placed on both ends of the board and the top. After the board is assembled and all of the equipment is checked out, the board is moved out of the semi trailer onto a portable trailer and moved to the hanging area. Based on where the board will be placed during the rodeo, a crane or" chain motors are used to lift the board up. It is then secured with cables and chains.

 

A signal cable is run from the board to the computers used to run it. Cables are also run to a monitor for the rodeo's announcer and to equipment used by the official timers. Electric eyes used to time the women's barrel race are integrated into the system. Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo operators are then ready to pro-gram individual committee information into their computers such as sponsors and specialty acts.

 

Prior to the rodeo each operator checks with the rodeo secretary to make sure all of the contestant information is correct. During the rodeo, assistants in the arena use radios to communicate pertinent information to the operators which s then placed on the scoreboard. All of the rodeo personnel work together to ensure the spectators are provided with accurate information in a timely manner.

 

"When we started this program nine years ago, we worked with the score-board manufacturers to develop board and programs to bring all of the man; elements together at a rodeo," Barron said. "This has been our most popular rodeo program and it has grown tremendously. We're very proud to be able to bring a scoreboard to the 101 Wild West Rodeo and are convinced it will make keeping up with all the rodeo action much easier."

 

With computer graphics, operator; that are knowledgeable about rodeo state of the art technology, the Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo scoreboards art designed to help everyone keep up wit! all of the activity at a rodeo. Spectators personnel and contestants in Ponca Cit; will be referring to the scoreboard throughout the rodeo to keep up wit! leaders, times and scores.

101 Wild West Rodeo Four-Night Affair

 

The dates have been set for a long period of time and you won't want to miss the 1999 edition of Ponca City's 101 Wild West Rodeo that will be at the Rodeo Grounds Arena Aug. 18-21. The arena is located on West Prospect Avenue, just west of North Ash Street.

 

Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue, and not at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect.

 

A full four nights of Profession-al Rodeo Cowboys Association rodeo, the event will enter its 40th annual arena ring under the direction of one of the best-run associations of the area. That's the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation.

 

Grand Entry time is 8 p.m., each night, but a special Stick Horse Grand Entry will be held at 7:45 p.m. each night when the first 101 youngsters showing up at the rodeo grounds will be presented stick horses, and they will parade around the arena ahead of the actual Grand Entry.

 

Besides the six regular PRCA events of bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, bull riding and team roping, the 101 Wild West Rodeo will have girl barrel racing.

 

There will be specialty acts throughout the four nights, usually with contracted groups or per-formers, in between the regular rodeo events to keep rodeo fans in their seats all night.

 

Another special event is the naming of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen, which is on Saturday night following a full week of activity for the contestants. They have to go through quite a lineup of events, including horseman-ship, as well as meeting the public and selling tickets to the rodeo much of the summer.

 

While the four-night rodeo runs Wednesday through Saturday, there will be action on Tuesday when a $5 admission fee for the whole night will begin at 4 p.m. with two complete go-rounds of steer roping, followed by rodeo slack in other roping events.

 

The Rodeo Foundation consists of several well-known rodeo fans that have only one thing in mind, to put on a great rodeo for the 101 Wild West Rodeo fans. Committee heads will take care of promotions, sponsorship, special events, concessions, grounds and con-tract situations.

 

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a more than 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

 

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

 

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

 

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they .called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment incentive for a National Editorial
Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

 

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

 

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962.

 

The 1999 rodeo will attempt to bring "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Colorado and Kansas.

 

Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena chutes, where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes. Additional special areas to view the rodeo were constructed a year ago, and there are box seats along the fence line of the arena.

101 Rodeo Begins

 

Action of the 101 Wild West Rodeo begins officially tonight for the four-night affair at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena on North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

 

And any indication of how things are going to go, it should be a great time for participants and spectators as they enjoy the sport, following Tuesday's slack performance.

 

While there will be plenty of action in the four nights of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, there were some pretty good times and efforts in the roping and steer wrestling events Tuesday during slack performances.

 

Take for instance, the 8.2 turned in during the second go-round of the steer roping event, by Guy Alien of Lovington, N.M. Alien just happens to be one of the regulars at the National Finals Rodeo from year to year, and has been there 13 so far.

 

That 8.2 coupled with an 11.4 earned him the best in the event at 19.6, a new record for the Ponca City arena.

 

In steer wrestling it was Spud Duvall of Checotah that had a 4.2 and that'll be hard to beat. All of the steer wrestlers will be seen during the four nights of regular performances, as they go into their second go-round.

 

That's true also for team roping and calf roping. Team roping has a first go-round tie at 6.3 by Bret Boatright, Mulhall and Kirt Jones of Lubbock, Texas that is the same turned in just a few steers earlier by Ron Waldrop of Town Creek, Ala. and his partner, Owen Lott of Prentiss, Miss.

 

But it was a home town night for the calf ropers. Jerome Schneeberger lit up the Cope Skoal scoreboard (and that's worth the price of admission, to keep track of the contestants throughout the night) with an 8.6. He'll have to continue that during the week, for right behind was Cody Ohi of Stephenville, Texas, at 8.8 and Oh! just happens to be the best from 1998.

Quick Times Open Rodeo Action Here

 

The first bareback rider out of the chutes of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Wednesday night set the pace for all other contestants and the crowd gave it's approval too.

 

That was Jared Lavergne of Voile Platte, La., when he scored an even 35 from the rider judge and the horse judge en route to a 70 score on Good Buddy Skoal of the Rafter H rodeo stock. That 70 was good enough to keep Lavergne in front despite some close company from four other riders able to stay on their broncs.

 

Douglas Alien Sanders of Steelville, Mo., had a 69 and then came Lance N. Crump of Klondike, Texas, with a 67. Next in the bareback so far is Eric Strick of Weatherford with a 66 and Ted Osman of Fort Scott, Kan., with a 65.

 

The crowd got a taste of some really good efforts in the steer wrestling, but it was the first one again to set the pace, and he did it with gusto. That was Rodney Burks of Benton, Ark., who hardly let the clock start ticking. He had that steer down on the ground and turned for the Hag, in 3.1 seconds.

 

That was the best by at least two seconds for the night. Stewart Gulager of Tahlequah had a 5.3 in the second go-round, but both Gulager and Barks were out -of the money for the overall steer wrestling title having had "no time" during the first go-round of slack on Tuesday.

 

Present leader in the steer wrestling is Jeff Babek of Granite, who had a 6.0 on Tuesday and came back with a 6.4 Wednesday to post an over- all 12.4. Only Brian Turney of McAlester was able to get under double digits in seconds for the rest of the night, and he did so with an 8.7.

 

During the saddle bronc event, Brent Burns of Edwardsville, Kan., had a 72 to go on top. Scott Frazer of Stephenville, Texas, took his 71 although he had been given the option of a re- ride as a result of the horse not getting him a good opportunity. That 71 put Frazer in second place, just ahead of Jeff Woodberry of Eugene, Mo., who had a 70 and Philip W. Haugen of Weatherford, with a 69. Jim McIntyre of Hastings, Neb., had a 67 and Todd W. Eberle of Burwell, Neb., had a 64.

 

During the calf roping, the crowd got another good show, when Trevor J. Brazile of Childress, Texas, had an 8.2 to go with his earlier mark of 9.3 for 17.5 and the lead in two go-rounds. Cody Ohi challenged that with a 9.5 on Wednesday, after he had an 8.8 on Tuesday, a total of 18.3.

 

Roy Cooper, Childress, and a National Finals Rodeo performer for many years, had a 9.0 and T.W. Snyder closed out the competition on Wednesday with an 8.4. Both were unable to do that in the first go-round however.

 

It was up to the team ropers to give quite a show next and they didn't disappoint. First out was the team of Mike Cervi of Midland, Texas and Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas, who had a 6.9 on Tuesday during the slack. They put an even better mark, 6.2 on the board to finish with the 13.1 two go-round lead at the present time.

 

Best of the night however, was the team of Chip Hamilton, Vian and partner Jory Levy, Twin Oaks, with a 5.9 They had a no-time in the Tuesday efforts.


A new event for the 101 Wild West Rodeo as produced by the 101 Rodeo Foundation, a local team roping contest, where the top eight from the first three nights, Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-day will go on Saturday to the arena in an effort for each roper to win a saddle. They are non-PRCA card carriers entered in the event, and competition was limited to a 60-mile radius of Ponca City.

 

The local team roping found Pawhuska s Randy Wadsworth and Barnsdall's Paul Lee Foreman do it in 7.1. That was pretty quick for a couple of rodeo guys just for fun. They lead presently by a good figure, since none others finished with under double digits as a result of penalties most of the time, for either leaving the box too early or getting just one hind leg by the heeler.

 

In the girls barrel racing, the first three gals out had a difficult time keeping all three barrels upright. As a result Hallie Munroe of Douglass had a 23.78, Tye Petska of Lexington had a 23.10 and Tacy Lynn Johnson of Henryetta had a 23.24.

 

But that changed from the effort of Kim Squires of Carnegie, who was the first to make the clover-leaf without disturbing the barrels. She finished in 17.90 and there was only one other that could do better than that. It came down to Sherry Cervi of Midland to go 17.68 for the current lead.

 

There were three others under 19, when Tama- ra Reinhardt of Lakin, Kan., had a 18.13; Lisa Lockhart of Oelrichs, S.D., had 18.17 and Kasey Nichols, Queen Creek, Ariz., had 18.34. Marcella Mays of Pawhuska posted 19.04.

 

The exciting finish came in the bull riding when David McLean of Paducah, Texas and K. J. Pletcher of Ardmore, each had a 78. Next came Donald A. Owens of Choctaw with a 72 followed by Brian Wooley, Burleson, Texas, with a 71. They were followed by Francis Wilson of Sidney, Neb., with a 69 and Garey Murphy, Winton Queensland, Australia, with a 67.

 

The action continues tonight at 8 p.m., and will be held again at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Don't forget the rodeo parade on Saturday, starting at 10 a.m. and heading along Grand Avenue from Oak Street to Sixth Street.

 

And there's the stick horse grand entry each night starting at 7:45 p.m. from the southwest gate of the arena. The first 101 youngsters to the southwest gate that haven't had the opportunity, will get a new stick horse for the stick horse grand entry and they can keep it too.

Cowboy Car Sales Challenge At Davis-Moore

 

Rodeo Foundation president Brad Beaty had an idea — the professional vs. the professional — but the professions highly differ.

 

On Saturday, August 21, from 12 - 2 p.m. Beaty and professional rodeo clowns Kevin Rich, Scott Cameron and Mike Johnson are challenging Steve Peresko, manager Davis-Moore Auto Group and his three sales associates that they can sell more cars than the seasoned dealers. The bounty? Braggin' rights.

 

According to Peresko "Dodge has sent us a special allocation of trucks just for the 101 Wild West Rodeo week and more are on their way. Additionally, patrons can sign up for a free belt buckle to be given away locally. Winning the belt buckle has an added bonus — the winner is automatically entered in the national drawing for either a Dodge pick-up, a Caravan, Intrepid or Duran-go to be given away at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in December."

 

"There are only 300 Dodge rodeos every year so the winner of the local belt buckle has a good chance at the national prize "

 

During the 101 Wild West Rodeo at the northeast corner of the rodeo grounds Davis-Moore has an area of trucks and vehicles on exhibition. People can also enter the belt buckle drawing there.

 

Peresko also says, "For every vehicle sold on Saturday, Davis-Moore will make a special contribution to the United Way Foundation."

 

"Patrons can also sign up for a free color television to be given away during Saturday's festivities at Davis-Moore." said Peresko

Rodeo Fans Get Real Treat Friday Night

 

Rodeo fans were hardly settled in their seats after the Grand Entry when the third bareback rider put on quite a show on Rafter H's Good Buddy Skoal at the Friday night performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

Best score the first two nights were 74 and under. But on Good Buddy Skoal, Jeffrey Collins of Redfield, Kan., got an 85. Two other Kansans had put themselves in the high spots under Thursday's 74 by Miles J. Bell, Amarillo, when D.J. John-son of Hutchinson had a 72 and then Mark Gomes, Nickerson, Kan., the National Finals Rodeo defending champion had a 73.

 

Best on Wednesday was a 70 by Jared Lavergne, Ville Platte, La.

 

Bull riders found it tough to stay on top of the Rafter H stock produced by Del Hall, as eight of 10 contestants were sent to the ground before the full eight seconds of the ride.

 

However, James Crider of Vienna, Mo., rode Bad Moon for a 75 score to go into third place behind the 78s posted Wednesday by David McLean, Paducah, Texas, and K.J. Pletcher, Ardmore. The only other eight-second ride Friday was Wayne Tasaka of Dodge City with a 68.

 

Barrel racers also found it tough with three taking five-second penalties for knocking a barrel over. Best time Friday, 18.08 by Kim Thomas, Springer, was fourth best heading into Saturday behind leader Sherry Cervi, Midland, 17.68 on a Wednesday tour of the clover-leaf pattern.

 

Kim Squires of Carnegie, Okla., had a 17.90 and on Thursday Phyllis Wells of Harrah had 17.91. Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., had an 18.14 for next best on Friday.

 

First two team ropers in the local non-PRCA card contestants within 60 miles of Ponca city were a 9.2 by Reggie Sargent of Newkirk and pal David Blair, Ponca City, followed by a 9.6 of Ted McKee, Ponca City and Red Nichols, Ponca City.

 

Best so far for the top eight spots to compete the final night Saturday was a 7.1 by Randy Wadsworth, Pawhuska and Paul Lee Foreman, Barnsdall, on Wednesday. Thursday's best was 8.5 by Buddy Osborn and Doug Osborn of Ponca City, while Gary Shultz of Pond Creek and teammate John Jerome of Orlando had a 9.1.

 

Best time among PRCA cowboys in team roping Friday were Robert Kirchner. Carrier, Okla., and Darin Suit, Dover, with 9.1 and that coupled with a 'slack' time of 10.5 gave them 19.6 overall, which is second best behind Mike Cervi, Mid-land and Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, with a 13.1 on go-round times of 6.9 and 6.2.

 

Tim Aduddell of Newcastle got a 6.3 Friday to go with a 'slack' 7.1 for 13.4 in steer wrestling and that's solid in the overall. But it is behind Thursday's Shaun Johnson, Checotah, 5.0 plus 5.6 for 10.6; Chauncey Larson, Manhattan, Kan., 5.6 with 5.9 for 11.5; and Sam Duvall, Checotah, 7.1 and 5.1 for 12.2. Jeff Babek, Granite, Okla., also is in there with a 6.0 and 6.4 for 12.4.

 

Saddle bronc riders weren't to be out-done with six staying on out of the six that appeared at the 101 Ranch arena Friday. And for their efforts, scores were up from 67 and 69, to three at 71 and the leader Friday Shane R. Lyon of Rapid City, S.D. with a 76. That put him behind former South Dakota rider Billy Etbauer, calling Edmond home now, who post a corrected 78 on Thursday. Bobby Gris-wold of Moore is second with a 77 on Thursday.

 

Calf ropers saw only three completing the run of roping and tying on Friday, with Craig Marshall, Amorita, Okla., leading the way with a 10.3. That goes with a 'slack' time of 15.4 for 25.7, the only one to advance in overall.


Among others tying for keeps were Dirk Decker of Clayton, Okla., with an 11.7 and Kaden Boardman, Jackson, Mo., with 26.8 after a penalty for leaving the box too soon.

 

Hometown favorite Jerome Schneeberger missed on a duplicate try of 8.6 in the first go, when the calf he tried to ripe Friday suddenly made a quick turn to the left, just as Schneeberger sent the rope straight ahead and it sailed to the right, just missing.

 

Trevor Brazile, Childress, Texas, remains on top with a Wednesday and 'slack' effort of 8.2 and 9.3 for 17.5 and that's just under the 18.3 of defending NFR champion Cody Ohi, Orchard, Texas, who had 8.8 and 9.5 on two calves.

Rodeo Ends With Some Great Efforts

 

They put the finishing touches on the 101 Wild West Rodeo and it's four nights of competition shortly after 10 p.m. Saturday night, but not before giving the largest crowd of the four nights something to cheer about.

 

While disappointment reigns in the ability of the cowboys to stay on the bulls of Rafter H producer Del Hall, the crowd couldn't have been disappointed in the stock as it was good enough to draw raves from National Finals Rodeo several times in the past few years. And that was evident Saturday night. There were 13 competitors in the bull riding event, and only Dennis Foyil of Guthrie was able to stay put for the minimum eight seconds needed to get a score. He did so on Batman and got a 76 for the ride.

 

In other events Saturday, the crowd couldn't have been given a better show. It saw six of the eight bareback riders in competition ride for scores, including a 72 by Shane K. Call of Hubert and a 70 by Chris Dare, Haysville, Kan.

 

Then in the steer wrestling, Dusty Duvall of Checotah showed why he is championship caliber, with a 4.5 to go with a 5.2 and a 9.7 overall on two.


In saddle bronc riding, Wes Bailey of Tampa, Kan., that's a little town in north-central Kansas, fashioned a 79 from the judges on Saddle Bags (that's a high-kicking horse, that would have thrown most others) en route to tops for the night. Cory F. Hughes of Preston, Kan., had a 76 and Jason Fairbanks of White River, S.D., had a 76.

 

The calf ropers had difficulties, except for two of the first three. Scott Mullen of Tecumseh got it done in 8.7 while Doug Clark of Wayne had an 8.6. Both had no time in slack so they were content to go with the times in the second go-round.

 

Team ropers of Nick Sartain, Yukon and Andy Bolton, Blan-chard had a 6.5 Saturday, while the team of Brandon Ward, Edmond and Zach Fanning, Ramona, Okla., had a 7.5.

 

The best in girl's barrel racing was a 17.89 by Jennifer Weaver, Vinita, and that put her second in that event overall.

 

The final standings, as provided by the Rafter H secretaries to Susan Kanode Cope Skoal Pro Rodeo writer, were:

 

Bareback bronc riding: 1, Jeffrey Collins, Redfield, Kan., 87 points on Good Buddy Skoal, $1,411.41. 2, Payne Dobler, Andover, Kan., 75, $1,069.25 3, Miles Bell, Amarillo, Texas, 74, $769.86. 3, Mark Gomes, Nickerson. Kan.; 73. $513.24. 4. Shane Call, Hulbert, Okla., 72, $299.39. 5, D.J. Johnson, Hutchinson, Kan., 71, $213.85.

 

Steer Wrestling: (second round) 1, Rodney Burks, Benton. Ark.. 3.1, $966.66. 2, Spud Duvall, Checotah, Okla., 4.3, $800. 3, Dusty Duvall, Checotah, Okla., 4.5, $633.33. 4/5, Teddy Johnson, Checotah, Okla., and Daniel Adams, Butler, Okla., 5.0, $383.33. 6, Sam Duvall, Checotah, Okla., 5.1, $166.66. (total on two) 1, Spud Duvall, 8.5, $966.66. 2, Dusty Duvall, 9.7, $800.00. 3, Shaun Johnson, Checotah, Okla., 10.6, $633.33. 4, Chancey Larson, Manhattan, Kan., 11.5, $466.66. 4, Sam Duvall, 12.2, $300.00. 6, Jeff Babek, Granite, Okla., 12.4, $166.66.

 

Saddle Bronc Riding: 1, Wes Bailey, Tampa, Kan., 81 points on Saddle Bags, $1,427.41. 2, Billy Etbauer, Ree Heights, S.D., 78, $1,081.37. 3, Bobby Griswold, Moore, Okla., 77, $778.59. 4/5, Ryan Elshere, New Underwood, S.D., and Corey Hughes, Preston, Kan., 76, $410.92. 6-8, Wilsey McMahano, JR., Cayuga, Texas; Dan Etbuaer, Goodwell, Okla.; and Robert Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla., 75, .$72.07.

 

Calf Roping: (second round) 1, Trevor Brazile, Childress, Texas. 8.2, $1,079.18. 2, T.W. Snyder, Col-bert, Okla., 8.4, $893.11. 3, Doug dark, Wayne, Okla., 8.6, $707.05. 4, Scott Mullen, Tecumseh, Okla., 8.7, $520.98. 5, Marty Brock HI, dishing, Okla., 8.8, $334.91. 6, Roy Cooper, Childress, Texas, 9.0, $186.06. (total on two) 1, Brazile, 17.5, !,079.18. 2. Cody Ohi, Orchard, Texas, 18.3, $893.11. 3, Darren York, Hydro, Okla., 19.1, $707.05. 4, Billy Hamilton, Vian, Okla., 20.5, $520.98. 5, Tommy Eaton. Adaa, Okla., 20.9, $334.91. 6, Troy Amoss, Albia, Iowa, 21.4, $186.06.

 

Team Roping: (second round) 1, Chip Hamilton, Vian, Okla., and Jory Levy, Twin Oaks, Okla., 5.9, $475.90. 2, Brian Dunning, Good-well, Okla., and Wade Jewell, Spearman, Texas, 6.0, $356.92. 3, Mike Cervi, Midland, Texas and Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, 6.2, $237.95. 4, Nick Sartain, Yukon, Okla., and Andy Bolton, Blan-chard, Okla., 6.5, $118.97. (total on two) 1. Cervi and Koontz, 15.1, $475.90. 2, Robert Kirchner, Carrier, Okla., and Darin Suit, Dover, Okla., 19.6, $356.92.. 3, Sartain and Bolton, 20.8, -$2a7.95. 4, Brannon Ward, Edmond, Okla., and Zach Fanning, Ramora, Okla., 24.2, $118.97.

 

Women's Barrel Race: 1. Sherry Cervi, Midland, Texas, 17.68, $1,021.60. 2, Jennifer Weaver, Vinita, Okla., 17.89, $875.66. 3, Kim Squires, Carnegie, Okla., 17.90, $729.72. 4, Phyllis Wells, Harrah, Okla., 17.91, $632.42. 5, Kim Thomas, Springer, Okla., 18.08, $486.48. 6, Teal Rice, Lakin, Kan., and Tamara Reinhardt, Lakin, Kan., 18.13, $340.53. 7, Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 18.14, $194.59. 9, Lisa Lock-hart, Oelrichs, S.D., and Connie Harris, Checotah, Okla., 18.17, $121.61.

 

Bull Riding: 1/2, David McLean, Paducah, Texas, on Scorpion and K.J. Pletcher, Ardmore, Okla., on Water Moccasin, 78, $1,464.14. 3/4, Dennis Foyil, Guthrie, Okla., and James Crider, Vienna, Mo., 75, $762.57. 5/6, Todd Fowler, Theodore, Ala., and Wes Dinwiddie, Donnelson, Iowa, 72, $396.53. 7-10, Donald Owens, Choctaw, Okla.; Brian Wooley, Burleson, Texas; Jeff Boudreau, Purcell, Okla.; and Case Drake, Sayre, Okla.; 71, $213.51.


THE 101 WILD WEST RODEO included an all new event this year — an All-Amateur Team Roping event sponsored by the 101 Beverage Co. with the winners taking home new saddles. Finishing with the best times on Saturday night were John Jerome from Orlando, Okla., and Gary Schultz from Pond Creek, Okla. Pictured left to right are Brad Beaty, John Linton, Cody Hunt, Bob Henderson, Nick Jeffries, John Jerome (winner), Scott Cunningham, Gary Schultz (winner), Keith Quiram, Donna Jeffries-White, Barbie Lewman and Jeremy Johnson.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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