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101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

Website will be updated as information becomes available.

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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WATCH HERE FOR A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2005

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 18th, 19th, & 20th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Ashley Van Hoesen - "Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005"
RODEO QUEEN: Brandi Linde SPECIALTY ACT: Keith Isley

101 Wild West Rodeo Will Have Three Performances


The 46th annual rodeo performances have been scheduled for August 18-20.

After several years of running a four-night performance rodeo, the foundation voted this year to return to a three-night performance with Wednesday reserved for rodeo slack.

Foundation members, along with numerous volunteers, will start fine-tuning the appearance of the arena for the annual 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Although the grounds are maintained year round and host other activities, the arena itself is preserved for rodeo. Preparing for a rodeo of this size takes full cooperation of the 16-member committee along with any volunteers they can drum up along the way.

Mowing, spraying, dirt work and trash pick up are just a start to the countless man-hours put in to gear up for performances.

Last minute details include painting, cleaning, and seat board replacement.

As show time nears Ponca City residents will start to see the lights in the arena on more often and longer each night.

Extra help is always appreciated and anyone interested in lending a hand is never turned away.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Larry Goodno, meets monthly all year long and welcomes the public to attend.

Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president, Darleanna Warnecke as secretary and Raye Lynne Brown as treasurer.

Anyone interested in contacting the Rodeo Foundation for meeting, volunteering, and other information may do so by calling 580-716-1057 or by visiting the 101 Rodeo Website.

 

Rodeo Parade Entries Sought


An open invitation "to anyone that would like to participate in the fun of being in a parade" has been extended by Shannon Chambers, chairman of the 46th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo parade.

The parade will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 20 and will run from west of the railroad tracks through the Ponca City downtown area along Grand Avenue to Fifth Street.

Anyone interested in being a participant in the parade or who would like more information should contact Shannon Chambers at (580) 765-9782 or Tim Blanton at (580) 765-2482. If no answer, please leave a message.

The sixth annual Kid's rodeo will be held immediately following the main parade, at the Ponca City Library area.

The 46th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo is scheduled for Aug. 18-20.
 

Rodeo Queen Contest Deadline Set July 30


The 101 Rodeo Foundation is sponsoring it's annual rodeo queen contest, which will be held Aug.18-20. It is opened to any Oklahoma female resident between the ages 13-24.

Contestants cannot be married, have ever been married, or have any children. Miss Oklahoma Rodeo guidelines will be followed. The entry deadline is July 30.

Contestants must sell $400 in rodeo tickets. Qualifying contestants will be required to provide a photo along with a biography sheet at the time of entering the contest. Judging will be based on 40 percent horsemanship, 30 percent public speaking, 15 percent appearance, and 15 percent personality. Candidates must also be prepared to represent the rodeo in the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo contest. Contestants may pay a $200 entry fee in lieu of selling rodeo tickets.

Activities for the candidates include a queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

Prizes include a Circle G barrel racing saddle and matching breast collar, Red Bluff solid sterling silver belt buckle, $300 in gift certificates  cards and a wealth of additional prizes donated by numerous local businesses and individuals.

Other prizes will be awarded to the first runner-up, horsemanship, speech, ticket sales, and Miss Congeniality.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition strives to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen. Handing down her crown is Kimber Craighead, of Mustang, Oklahoma.

The queen competition has a history of queens who have gone on to winning state finals including Miss Oklahoma Rodeo and Miss Teen Rodeo.

For further information, call Tim Blanton at (580) 765-2482. If no answer, leave a message, or visit the Web site for additional information and application.

Promoting Oklahoma Is Expensive
By Louise Abercrombie - News Staff Writer

Have horse will travel — if I can get the hay and the gas. That's Ashley Van Hoesen, Miss Oklahoma Rodeo's theory. The 24-year Ponca City beauty has been traveling the state and the nation making personal appearances on behalf of Oklahoma.

But her funds are running low. Due to the high cost of gasoline and other expenses she had to cancel the Calgary Stampede appearance.

This week she is off to the Elks Rodeo at Woodward, and then the Cheyenne Rodeo, and home to Ponca City to the 101 Wild West PRCA Rodeo, where she has been selected as the grand marshal. Rodeos, parades, class room appearances have all been a part of the celebrity scene.

Ponca Citians and others have been supportive of Ashley, raising funds with a coronation ball earlier this year, but expenses have diminished those funds.

In the state she uses a horse trailer donated by Featherlight to haul her horse Annie B., to events. Sometimes she shares rides with Miss Rodeo Teen of Claremore. While out of state most stock contractors furnish a horse for her to ride. Another local horse that she sometimes rides is named Sox. It belongs to Jim Lessert.

 

The goal of the attractive brown-eyed blonde is to win the Miss America Rodeo crown. That title event is set during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in late November and early December.

Ashley wants to win the national title to promote Oklahoma. In the 51 years the event has been held an Oklahoma woman has never won.

Larry Goodno, president of the 101 Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, says, "We think that Ashley has a good chance to win. We think it would be good for the state for her to win."

A University of Oklahoma graduate with a degree in business/marketing, Ashley hasn't had much time to pursue a career this year due to her heavy rodeo schedule.

The Miss America Rodeo title provides a salary, scholarship and pays all the expenses for a year. Often, the towns where she is appearing in an event will provide a hotel room or a host family. A number of her meals are included. But, meanwhile the horse and the vehicle "have to eat."

Looking good in rodeo clothes is just part of the challenge for the national title. Ashley will be judged on horsemanship, personality and interviews, plus knowledge on the PRCA, equine information and current events.

Another area of competition is public speaking, and Ashley is presently working on her speech extolling the advantages of Oklahoma.

Amateur Team Roping Event At 101 Wild West Rodeo Again

The Amateur Team Roping event to be held at the 101 Wild West Rodeo is a feature that began a few years ago and is now sponsored by Kaw Nation Casino Trophy Saddles. New saddles will be awarded to the winning team on two head.

Trophy breast collars, donated by Kaw Nation Smoke shop, will be awarded to the second place team on two head.

Eight teams will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, Aug. 18-20, with the first callers getting their night of choice. The remaining teams will participate in slack on Wednesday night.

The top eight teams of the first two nights will be competing Saturday night in the finals.

Eligibility includes that teams entering live within a 60-mile radius of Ponca City, and be 18 years of age or older and not carrying a PRCA card or permit. Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps) are required.

In the event of a tie for the saddles, a rope-off on one head and fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 4, only at 580-765-2980 between 8 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 15 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, located at the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

Wild Cow Milking Returns To 101 Wild West Rodeo

Wild Cow Milking is returning to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Aug. 18-20.

There will be a payout of 100 percent of first through fourth places minus stock charge of $20 per team, (40, 30, 20, 10) based on nightly times. In the event of a tie, a milk-off will be held on another cow and the fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

Qualifications include that the first 15 teams registering will be the only ones accepted, with the cost being $100 entry fee per team. The same three member team will be able to enter only one time. All team members will be on horseback.

Only those living within a 60 mile radius of Ponca City will be eligible, and members must be 18 years of age or older and not carrying a PRCA card or permit. Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps) are required.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 4, only at 580-765-2980 between 8 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 15 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, located at the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

Amateur Ranch Bronc Riding At 101 Rodeo

The Amateur Ranch Bronc Riding event to be held at the 101 Wild West Rodeo is new to this year's rodeo.

Five individuals will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, Aug. 18-20, with the first callers getting their night of choice. The remaining teams will participate in slack on Wednesday night.

Qualifications include that the first 15 individuals registering will be the only ones accepted, with the cost being $25 entry fee per person. Ride as Ride can, Stock Saddles Only, Additional Ground Rules Will be Announced. $300 Added Prize Money.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 4, only at 580-765-2980 between 8 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 15 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, located at the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

Late entries will be taken one hour prior to each nights performance at the Rodeo Arena, If space is still available.

Phone Entries in Tonight For Three Rodeo Events

Three special events will be available for area cowboys and ranch hands during the 101 Wild West Rodeo Aug. 18-20. But they will have to be on their toes tonight, as entries for each of the three events, wild cow milking, amateur team roping and amateur ranch bronc riding must be phoned in.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 4, only at 580-765-2980 between 8 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 15 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, located at the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

Payout will be 100 percent of Pot Paid first through fourth places minus stock charge of $20 per team, in the Wild Cow Milking contest. It will be based on nightly times. In the event of a tie, a milk-off will be held on another cow and the fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

Qualifications include that the first 15 teams registering will be the only ones accepted, with the cost being $100 entry fee per team. The same three member team will be able to enter only one time. All team members will be on horseback.

Only those living within a 60 mile radius of Ponca City will be eligible, and members must be 18 years of age or older and not carrying a PRCA card or permit. Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps) are required.

The Amateur Team Roping event to be held at the 101 Wild West Rodeo is a feature that began a few years ago and is now sponsored by Kaw Nation Casino Trophy Saddles. New saddles will be awarded to the winning team on two head.

Trophy breast collars, donated by Kaw Nation Smoke shop, will be awarded to the second place team on two head.

Eight teams will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, Aug. 18-20, with the first callers getting their night of choice. The remaining teams will participate in slack on Wednesday night.

The top eight teams of the first two nights will be competing Saturday night in the finals.

Eligibility includes that teams entering live within a 60-mile radius of Ponca City, and be 18 years of age or older and not carrying a PRCA card or permit. Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps) are required.

In the event of a tie for the saddles, a rope-off on one head and fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

The Amateur Ranch Bronc Riding event to be held at the 101 Wild West Rodeo is new to this year's rodeo.

Five individuals will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, Aug. 18-20, with the first callers getting their night of choice. The remaining teams will participate in slack on Wednesday night.

Qualifications include that the first 15 individuals registering will be the only ones accepted, with the cost being $25 entry fee per person. Ride as ride can, stock saddles only, additional ground rules will be announced. $300 added prize money.

Late entries will be taken one hour prior to each nights performance at the Rodeo Arena, if space is still available.

Vice Mayor Paul Krueger Says It's '101 Wild West Rodeo Week'

The week of Aug. 15-20, 2005, has been proclaimed "101 Wild West Rodeo Week" in Ponca City and all citizens are urged to promote it by participating in some way.

Vice Mayor Paul Krueger proclaimed the week during Monday's session of the Ponca City Board of Commissioners.

 

Krueger said that citizens are encouraged to participate during the week by wearing western wear, attending the parade and three-day rodeo and encouraging out-of town friends, relatives and acquaintances to attend.

 

The rodeo will be held on the evenings of Aug. 18-20.

In essence, the proclamation emphasizes not only the tremendous historical and cultural significance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, but also its positive impact on the development of the community's economic prosperity.

Krueger said the 101 Wild West Rodeo is sanctioned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and attracts world-class professional athletes to compete in our community.

Joining Krueger on Monday, Larry Goodno, president of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation, said there will be 126 more cowboys participating this year than last year.

"The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation, the Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce and the City of Ponca City are seeking to make the 101 Wild West Rodeo one of the top rodeo attractions in the nation," said Krueger.

Accordingly, he said the rodeo "needs the support of all area citizens in making and maintaining our rich heritage, developing our economic prosperity and achieving national recognition."

Dress Western To Promote 101 Ranch Rodeo

Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a contest for the "Best Western Decorated Business." All Ponca City Chamber businesses are encouraged to decorate their businesses for the 101 Ranch Rodeo and also to allow their employees to dress western starting Monday, Aug. 15-Saturday, Aug. 20.

Those who plan to participate in this fun week of activities please contact the Chamber Office for official entry in the contest 765-4400.

What is a contest without a great prize? No problem in this situation we will have three winners and each winner will receive one night "box seat" at the Rodeo, which will seat eight.

The first place business will have first pick of the night they would like to attend the Rodeo, then the second place business will choose, and the third place business will take the last available night.

"The Chamber has some great judges lined up and plan on making this lots of fun, so please call today and sign up for the contest," according to Rich Cantillon, Chamber president.

"Please help promote and support the 101 Ranch Rodeo, a great Ponca City tradition," said Cantillon. The 101 Ranch Rodeo is Thursday-Saturday Aug. 18-20 with slack steer roping on Wednesday, Aug. 17.

Kelly Trail Ride Planned

The Kelly Trail Ride will take place starting Friday night and conclude in Ponca City Tuesday afternoon.

Riders will move into camp Friday evening. The campsite is located in the Bressie Community. On Saturday morning, the ride will start around 8 a.m. The ride consists of four days riding in a cloverleaf pat-tern around the area, with the last day riding from the Salt Fork River to the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena ground.

The riders will stop for lunch at the Standing Bear Park and continue their journey to unofficially kick off the 101 Wild West Rodeo through the downtown area of Ponca City at approximately 1:30 p.m. (It could be slightly earlier, or slightly later, depending on weather conditions).

The Kelly Trail Ride was started in 1977 by Dewey Kelly. It's riders consisted of the Kelly family and neighboring friends. Through the years, it has grown to approximately 110 riders and five wagons.

This is a family tradition carried on every August by the Kelly family.

101 Wild West Rodeo Coming Soon
Ponca City is gearing up for The 46th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo. Starting with two rounds of steer roping and rodeo slack on Wednesday, Aug. 17, regular rodeo performances will run Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 18-20 at 8 p.m. nightly. The 101 Rodeo Arena is located at the intersection of North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

The official rodeo dance will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights following the performances at the Rockin' Horse Country Dance Club, north of Ponca City.

Returning to the rodeo this year and sure to provide a high level of excitement is the local Wild Cow Milking event, there will be five teams a night competing for the prize money.

Also returning to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

New this year is an added local event Ranch Bronc Riding. Five individuals will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, and they will Ride as Ride can and it's sure to be a crowd pleaser.

Announcer Returns

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. A lighted scoreboard, which was new for 2003, will give fans the latest in scorekeeping technology, helping to make this year an even more spectacular rodeo for first time spectators and veteran fans alike.

This year's rodeo, again produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company of Tahlequah, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a four-night plus slack rodeo. Hall a former contestant in both riding and timed events has spent over 36 years in the stock contracting business; the last 27 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

Rough Stock Protection

Serving as Barrel man this year is Keith Isley. Bullfighters are Josh Rivinius and Dustin Brewer.

Isley hails from North Carolina, generally a non-traditional rodeo state, but that hasn't hindered this rodeo clown's advancement over the years. Isley is a four-time winner of the PRCA's "Specialty Act of the Year," five time finalist for "Coors Man in the Can," five time finalist for "Clown of the Year," and winner of "Comedy Act of the Year" in 2001. He has an interactive style that holds something for everyone.

 

Rivinius has one priority cowboy protection. Rivinius has competed in rodeo his whole life starting out in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events and finally furthering his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability; he has established himself as a premier bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry.

Brewer from Elk City, Oklahoma, started rodeoing at the age of seven. During high school, he rode barebacks and bulls and continued to do so for a few years. Feeling he didn't have what it took to be a great rider, he turned his attention to the life long dream of being a rodeo clown and bullfighter.

Bringing the specialty act for the 101 Wild West rodeo this year is also Keith Isley,  Isley warns spectators that "the first time you see my act, you may think it's alcohol related -- but it's not."

Isley spends a lot of time falling off his horse and standing on the saddle during his comedy trick-riding act. And don't be surprised when he ends up on his head -- in the saddle.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the first event at the Saturday night performance. Vying for the title this year are Kate Chambers of Pawhuska, Leah Beth Fischer of Newkirk, and Brandi Linde of Pawhuska.

Reigning queen, Kimber Craighead of Mustang, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have ample opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

Western Wear Emphasized

"Rodeo Week" in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. Grand Marshal this year is Ponca City's own Ashley Van Hoesen - "Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005". The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at in the 500 block of East Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, hoppy horse barrel racing, mechanical bull rides, pony rides, and dummy roping are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kiddies.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year's rodeo. Thursday is Family Night Ages 12 & under FREE - Adults: $8 Advance, $10 Gate, Friday & Saturday Adults: $8 Advance, $10 Gate - Ages 7-12 $5 - Ages 6 & under Free. Advanced tickets can be found at any grocery store in Ponca City, First National Bank of Oklahoma, Home National Bank, Pioneer Bank & Trust, Cherokee Strip Credit Union, Tractor Supply and Corral West.

Anyone wishing to get more information is welcome to call the Rodeo Foundation office at (580) 765-2980 and urged to visit our website.

Public Invited To Queen Activities

Rodeo queens will be arriving in Ponca City Thursday, Aug. 18. Several queens' activities are scheduled and the public is invited to attend.

A luncheon will be held at the Ponca Townsite Company, located at 116 N. 4th street, on Friday, Aug. 19, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Guests will be given the opportunity to see queen contestants model outfits and hear their speeches, both requirements for Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Contest. Cost will be $10.00 per person and will consist of Lunch, beverage, and dessert.

Horsemanship competition will also be held Friday, at the Play Pen Arena at 5 p.m. Guests will witness the queens perform a pattern on horseback, a question and answer session with judges, and a queen's run.

Saturday, Aug. 20, the queens will be at the Kids Rodeo in front of the Ponca City Library immediately after riding in the parade which starts at 10 a.m. They will be helping out with booths, signing autographs, and visiting with the kids.

Autograph sessions will also be held at Davis Moore and Corral West Saturday afternoon and at each nightly performance of the Rodeo.

Queen coronation will be held after the grand entry at Saturday's rodeo performance.

101 Wild West Rodeo Parade Set Saturday
The 101 Wild West Ranch Rodeo Parade will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, running from well west of the railroad tracks through the Ponca City downtown area along Grand Avenue.

The Grand Marshal for this year's parade is Ashley Van Hoesen - "Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005".

The Rodeo Parade Committee Chairman Shannon Chambers is looking for participants for this year's parade. If you are interested in being a participant in the parade or you would like more information contact Shannon Chamber (580) 765-9782 or Tim Blanton at (580) 765-2482, if no answer please leave a message.

The sixth annual Kid's rodeo will be held immediately following the main parade, at the Ponca City Library area.

Sixth Annual Kids Rodeo Set Saturday
The Ponca City Library invites "all you rootin' tootin' cowboys and cowgirls to come join the fun" at the 6th annual Kid's Rodeo at the library Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., following the rodeo parade.

Events will include:

In the street on Grand Avenue

 11:00 until 1:00 Sunshine Boys Band sponsored by Conoco/Phillips

11:30 Native American Dancers sponsored by Pioneer Bank

12:00 Stagecoach Holdup performed by Riders of the Cimarron sponsored by Friends of the Library

On-going events on the Library and Civic Center Lawns:

Hoppy Horse Corral sponsored by ConocoPhillips

Stick Horse Flag Race sponsored by the Library

Musical Hay Bales sponsored by Friends of the Library

Money in the Hay sponsored by Eastman National Bank

Horse Beanbag Toss sponsored by Friends of the Library

Stagecoach Rides sponsored by Wells Plumbing and ConocoPhillips

Mechanical Bull Rides sponsored by Ward’s Air Conditioning Inc.

Rodeo Queens Autographs sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation

Pony Rides sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation

Tie the Ribbon on the Goat Tail sponsored by the Library

Cow Patty Throw sponsored by the Library

Dummy Roping sponsored by the Library

Trick Roping Instructions sponsored by Friends of the Library

Book Sale sponsored by Friends of the Library (includes lots of children’s books)

101 Ranch Picture Display sponsored by 101 Ranch Collectors

Children’s Fingerprinting at the corner of 5th and Grand

Bring your kids and lawn chairs and enjoy the events in the street.

Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Here Again for 101 Wild West Rodeo
The Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company headquartered in Tahlequah, owned by Dell Hall, will again be the rodeo producer of the 101 Wild West Rodeo here this week.

Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys as well, providing stock for a three-night plus slack rodeo.

Hall has spent over the last 38 years in the stock contracting business and the last 27 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

A former contestant in both riding and timed events, Dell Hall knows that the draw-end of the business' can either make or break a contestant. When contestants pull up to a rodeo, they need to draw an animal that they or any other contestant can place on to win money. In respect for the rodeo as a whole, Hall tries to keep his stock as even as possible for all the contestants entered.

Most recent awards from the Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company have been in 1999 when the Prairie Circuit (Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska) named specific stock from the firm Saddle bronc of the Year and Bull of the Year.

The 1998 PRCA Bucking Bull of the Year Skoal's King Kong was from Rafter H, and there have been numerous awards prior to that, including Bucking Bull of the Year in the PRCA in 1984 and 1981. Other awards have gone back as far as 1979.

National Anthem Singers for 101 Wild West Rodeo

Erikah Parcher is the 8-year-old daughter of Carl and Rana Parcher. She has three older brothers, Matthew, Christopher, and Jacob. She will be a 3rd. grader at South Haven School, in South Haven Kansas this fall.

 

Erikah has been training and performing since she was 3-year-old. She studies at Ponca City's Inciardi School of Dance and Kem's Gym. She takes vocal training with Leslie Rardin. She has performed in American Kid's performances, Ponca City's Iris Festival, dance recitals, county fairs, Ponca City Country Club, and the Quail Valley Fun Barn in Winfield, Ks.

 

Erikah recently played the title role of "Annie" in Ponca Playhouse's production of "Annie".

Keith D. Hines, Jr. is the 20-year-old son of Dwayne and Laura Hines. He has two brothers Kyle and Kenny.

 

Keith studied voice with Leslie Rardin from age 10 to age 18. He is on a scholarship to Oklahoma City University for Musical Theatre/Vocal Education (double major). He will be starting his junior year in the fall and is now studying voice with Florence Birdwell at OCU.

 

Keith is an honor student and a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity. He was a state winner in Oklahoma Federated Jr. Music Club Festival and he received the Ponca City Music Club Scholarship.

 

Keith has performed at OCU and with the Ponca Play House. His playhouse credits include Annie, You're A Good Man Charlie Brown and The Fantastics.

Debbie Boles Loughridge began her entertainment career in 1986 and became the featured vocalist with the Northern Oklahoma College show group "The Roustabouts". Since then she appeared as lead singer in various groups in north central Oklahoma and southern Kansas.

Debbie opens many events with the National Anthem and pre-show entertainment, which she will perform Saturday night.

101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen.

Our queen's competition offers a wealth of gifts and prizes, including a handmade, hand tooled queen's saddle valued well over $1,200.

Numerous Ponca City merchants have donated awards and gifts for the queen, horsemanship and runner-up winners.

Ponca Tribal Member Rosetta LeClair has hand-beaded a traveling tiara and sash for our queen, keeping the Native American influence a part of the 101 Heritage.

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

The contestants are judged 40% on horsemanship, 30% on public speaking, 15% each on appearance and 15% on personality. The coronation will be during Saturday's performance.

These are the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Contestants
 Listed In Alphabetical Order

Kate Chambers is the 19-year-old daughter of Charley and Kay Chambers. She is a 2004 graduate with honors of Pawhuska High School and currently she is a sophomore at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater pursuing a degree in Ag Economics and Accounting.

Her family has been ranching in the Osage County just North of Pawhuska for five generations now and growing up on a ranch has allowed Kate to spend many hours on the back of a horse and this has increased her riding skills and overall knowledge of horses. She feels fortunate to have been brought up in the midst of this western heritage.

Kate started her career as a queen in 2003 as the Pawhuska Round-Up Club Queen and Cavalcade Co-hostess. Then in 2004, she ran for the Cavalcade Queen title as the Pawhuska Riding and Roping Club Queen. Much to Kate’s surprise, she was crowned the 2005 Host Cavalcade Queen and she has enjoyed every minute!

Kate cannot say for sure what the future has in store for her but she knows that she wants to finish school at OSU and then go on to a career in business or accounting. Kate plans to stay close her heritage with hopes of keeping some involvement in ranching. However, her life may turn out she will enjoy it to the fullest!

 

Leah Beth Fischer is the 22-year-old daughter of Milton and Judy Fischer, she grew up around racetrack, where her mother was a jockey and her father was a horse trainer and owner. Leah Beth began competing in rodeos as young as four years old. Rodeo has been an addiction and a love others ever since. She has competed in barrel racing, pole bending, and breakaway roping and continues to love the thrill of competing in these events.

 

Leah Beth graduated from Oklahoma State University with a Bachelor's in Psychology, and will be attending OSU-Tulsa to obtain her Master's in Forensics with a Psychology emphasis beginning this fall.

 

Leah Beth has held the titles of Ark City Maverick Princess and Chautauqua County Rodeo Queen. She competes regularly in horse shows, jackpots, and rodeos. When she isn't on a horse, she enjoys playing golf, singing, and attending church, but her life is her horses and her passion is rodeo.

 

Brandi Linde is the 23-year-old daughter of Randy and Lorraine Linde. She has three sisters, one who happens to be my twin. She currently works as a Veterinary Assistant. Her plans include furthering her education to become a Veterinary Technician.

 

Brandi is currently a member of the Kansas Women's Ranch Rodeo Association and proudly sponsored by Schupbach's Truck Ranch out of Pawhuska, OK.

 

Brandi also enjoys team roping, spending time with her family and friends, and training her colts and dogs. She loves teaching children about the fundamentals of horsemanship.

101 Wild West Rodeo Set for Three-Night Performance

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making a three-night performance run in Ponca City this year.

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo will be Aug. 18-20, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. A new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

The 2005 Rodeo will mark the 46th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven and the press box have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

The 2003 rodeo brought back to Ponca City the "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

The 2005 rodeo will attempt to bring the "Rodeo of the Year" prize back to Ponca City again.

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, which have included calf scramble, boot race, and other activities. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, in his fourth year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the three-night stand. Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president; Darleanna Wamecke as secretary and Raye Lynne Brown as treasurer.

Starting with two rounds of steer roping and rodeo slack at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 17, regular rodeo performances will run Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 18-20 at 8 p.m. nightly.

The official rodeo dance will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights following the performances at the Rockin' Horse Country Dance Club, north of Ponca City.

Back again to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. Also back this year will be the lighted score board, giving fans the latest in scorekeeping technology, helping to make this year an even more spectacular rodeo for first time spectators and veteran fans alike.

This year's rodeo, again produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company of Tahlequah, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a four-night plus slack rodeo. Hall, a former contestant in both riding and timed events, has spent 37 years in the stock contracting business; the last 24 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

Serving as Barrel man this year is Keith Isley, Rodeo Clown, Barrel Man & Specialty Act. Bullfighters are Josh Rivinius, 2001 Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter & Dustin Brewer, 2002 Prairie Circuit Finals Bullfighter.

Isley returns to the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the first time since 2001. Isley brings 33 years of rodeo experience including bullfighter, clown, barrel man and specialty acts. He warns spectators that "the first time you see my act, you may think it's alcohol related — but it's not."

Rivinius has competed in rodeo his whole life starting out in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events and finally furthering his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability; he has established himself as a premier bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

Like Rivinius, Brewer has one priority ... cowboy protection. Dustin Brewer AKA "The Dustman" brings his talents to the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year. Not only does he work protection for the cowboys but he has also worked as a funnyman and as a barrelman in the past. Brewer believes that today a person has to be more flexible to allow as many contracted rodeos as possible.

Bringing the specialty act for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year is also Keith Isley, Rodeo Clown, Barrel Man & Specialty Act. Isley spends a lot of time falling off his horse and standing on the saddle during his comedy trick-riding act. And don't be surprised when he ends up on his head — in the saddle.

He hails from North Carolina, generally a non-traditional rodeo state, but that hasn't hindered this rodeo clown's advancement over the years. Isley is a four-time winner of the PRCA's "Specialty Act of the Year," five time finalist for "Coors Man in the Can," five time finalist for "Clown of the Year," and winner of "Comedy Act of the Year" in 2001.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance. The contests vying for the title this year will be announced after the application deadline of July 29.

Reigning queen, Kimber Craighead of Mustang, Okla., will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have ample opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

"Rodeo Week" in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the 500 block of East Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock. Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

Reigning 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Has Had Great Time
The reigning Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen, Kimber Craighead, has a tough time realizing that this week she will have completed a year of having that title.

"I cannot believe that the time has already come to hand over my title. The past year has been so great. The opportunity that I have had to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo has been not only a once in a lifetime opportunity, but also one of the best experiences of my life," she said.

"The 101 Wild West Rodeo is one of the biggest and well known rodeos in the state of Oklahoma, and to be the queen of this rodeo is truly an honor. Throughout the last year, beginning with the pageant, I have met many great people. I feel that I have gained so much experience in the past year representing the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

"I would like to thank my parents for the support, the rodeo committee for producing such an incredible pageant, and the many generous people who sponsor the queen pageant because without them none of this would ever have been made possible."

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005

On August 14, 2004, Ashley Van Hoesen was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005.

Born and raised in Ponca City, Oklahoma. Ashley is the daughter of Everette & Sonja Van Hoesen. After graduating in the spring of 2004 from the University of Oklahoma with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Marketing. Ashley decided to chase her dreams in the rodeo arena. Growing up with the rich rodeo heritage of the World famous Miller Brother’s 101 Ranch in Ponca City and her own family’s ranching and farming tradition, she decided to lend her hand to the preservation of the American Cowboy.

Ashley is excited to represent her home state of Oklahoma throughout the state of Oklahoma throughout the Prairie Circuit and the United States, as well as at the Miss Rodeo America Pageant.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen 2005

Amanda Burrows is the 16 year-old daughter of Ron and Kathy Burrows of Claremore. She is currently a junior at Claremore High School.

Amanda has been around horses almost all of her life and enjoys showing her Paint Gelding, Casper, and is starting her 3 year-old mare, Breezy.

She is a member of the OCCA and shows cattle and hogs as well as being very involved with her FFA chapter competing in speech contests, horse judging, and serving as the chapter secretary. Amanda is also the Rogers County 4-H Horse Club President.

Amanda has been around rodeo since she was young and was always excited when she saw the rodeo queens run by on their horses. Since then, she has wanted to be a rodeo queen. Amanda represented her hometown rodeo as the 2004 Will Rogers Stampede Teen at the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen Pageant. With hard work and determination she achieved her goal and she was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen 2005.

Amanda feels she has been given a huge blessing with this title and wants to represent it to the best of her ability. She would like to thank her friends and family for their support as well as the Will Rogers Round-Up Club and the Oklahoma Rodeo Pageants Council for this opportunity. Amanda is honored to travel across the state of Oklahoma and represent such a great organization.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess 2005

Rachael Ann Smith is the daughter of Jimmy and Stacie Smith and granddaughter of Mike and Joyce Crouch, Martin and Sylvia Smith, and Ben and Patricia Lawler, all of Ponca City. Rachael is a honor roll student and a member of the Ponca City District 5th Grade Honor Choir.

Rachael has always loved the sport of rodeo, and has grown up with horses being a large part of her family's extracurricular activities. Rachael entered her first rodeo pageant at the age of eight and was immediately hooked. In 2004, Rachael won the title of Miss Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Princess and went on to represent her title during the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess 2005 Pageant.

She is both excited and honored to be Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess 2005. When asked what first came to her mind shortly after being crowned, Rachael replied, "I dreamed every night this crown would be mine, and now I know big dreams can come true."

Rachael hopes to interest other young people, and those young at heart, in the sport of rodeo and hopefully they, too, will become involved with a sport that holds deep roots here in our state of Oklahoma.

Origins of the 101 Ranch Wild West Show
By Al Ritter - Board Member, 101 Ranch Old Timers Association

Ponca City's 46th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo can trace its origins to a once mighty western empire. 100 years after the fact, the roots of the Ponca City 101 Wild West Rodeo will forever be linked to 101 Ranch and its Wild West Shows.

That historical relationship began when Colonel George Washington Miller relocated his growing cattle operation from the Oklahoma/Kansas border country to the rich bottomland of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River in 1892, some six miles southwest of current day Ponca City. This was the Colonel's third ranch effort within the northern area of Indian Territory once known as the Cherokee Outlet (Cherokee Strip).

In the spring of 1895, the industrious native of Kentucky began to put 2000 acres of virgin prairie to the plow and planted it in order to winter Texas cattle. In the fall, several thousand additional acres of wheat was sown and produced for that time period, an impressive 35 bushels an acre.

Buying additional property along with lease agreements with the Ponca Indian Tribe, the 101 Ranch expanded to some 75,000 acres of pastureland. With hard work and good fortune, the Ranch grew to an estimated 110,000 acres. Its boundaries were found in the four Oklahoma counties of Noble, Pawnee, Osage and Kay. The communities of Marland (originally Bliss, O.T.), Red Rock and White Eagle were within the bounds of the giant farm and ranch operation.

With Colonel G. W. Miller's passing in 1903, his three sons, Joe, George and Zack continued expansive operation of the ranch. Experimental and highly successful agriculture applications were developed while the brothers built a herd of 25,000 longhorns. Led by Joe Miller, the brothers additionally raised large herds of Holstein, Shorthorn and Hereford dairy cattle along with Duroc-Jersey hogs. Their swine production alone resulted in their ability to ship 10,000 hogs a year to market.

Correctly earning the title of a "Fabulous Empire", the ranch constructed its own packing plant, ice plants and cold-storage lockers. Other innovations for the time included a tannery, a cider mill, an alfalfa mill, an electric power plant, a dairy and the ranch's own cannery. Later when oil was found on ranch land, the three Miller brothers built their own refinery producing gasoline, kerosene and fuel oil.

Greater expansion was soon on the horizon when the ranch entered the entertainment field. Gaining an endorsement from the National Editorial Association of St. Louis to hold its annual newspaper editors convention for 1905 in Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory, Colonel Joe Miller scheduled an entertainment gala for the influential visitors at the 101 Ranch.

Drawing from the legends, lore and history of a quickly passing period of American history, the days of the "Old West", the Miller brothers put on an eye-popping extravaganza they promoted as a "Round-up". Souvenir programs, much like you purchase at today's 101 Wild West Rodeo, additionally billed the Oklahoma Gala as a Cowboy Reunion, Indian Celebration, Buffalo Chase and Historical Exhibition.

Featuring at least 200 local cowboys, ranch hands and Indians, arrangements were made to have the imprisoned frontier warrior Geronimo brought to the ranch under military guard from Fort Sill, O.T. The aging warrior killed a buffalo in the arena, signed autographs and sold souvenirs. Among other larger than life promotions, the Millers advertised in area newspapers they would offer a $1,000 prize to anyone who would submit to being scalped by Geronimo.

More than 65,000 people attended the long afternoon of events of June 11, 1905 and overflow crowds easily filled a mile long grandstand built for the event. Performing ranch honed skills, cowboys and cowgirls paraded that huge grandstand on the south side of the Salt Fork River along with vividly costumed Ponca, Kaw, Otoe, Missouri, Tonkawa, Pawnee and Osage Indians, marching bands, soldiers and Geronimo. Along with Geronimo's mock "buffalo hunt", trick riding, bucking horses and a performance by the "Dusky Demon" from Texas, Bill Pickett, the evening ended with an unannounced frontier style wagon train attack by Indian performers.

The remarkable performance gained national attention and brought the 101 Ranch into the venue of thrilling western entertainment. So successful was the show, Colonel Joe Miller and his brothers formed the 101 Ranch Real Wild West Show and began to tour the United States. They joined the ranks of such notables of that era which included Buffalo Bill's Congress of Rough Riders, Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show and P.T. Barnum as well as a myriad of smaller circuses and western shows touring the U.S.

By 1914, the 101 Ranch Real Wild West Shows began touring internationally. This included performances in England, the European continent and South America. In 1925 the Miller brothers entertained the King and Queen of England along with an estimated 700,000 spectators during thirty-three performances.

Prior to the 1930's it wasn't unusual for visitors traveling to or through the 101 Ranch to see captive deer, caribou, alligators, apes, chimpanzees, anteaters, ostriches, peacocks and a soda pop swilling bear named Tony.

Following the unexpected deaths of brothers Joe (1927) and George (1929), brother Zack was unable to cope with managing what had become a vast empire while dealing with changing economic times of the great depression.

The 101 Ranch Real Wild West Show went on the road for the last time in 1931. By the spring of 1932, all assets of the ranch were gone. A federal receivership and bankruptcy haunted the last surviving Miller brother, Colonel Zack Miller Sr. and what had once been a truly western empire, the 101 Ranch and its Real West Shows.

Although the Miller brothers, their "Fabulous Empire", their "Round-up" Shows and Wild West Show are gone, the Ponca City 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation was formed and produced their first celebration parade and rodeo in 1960.

100 years after the first 101 Wild West Round-up, the citizens of Ponca City and the devotees of the truly western sport of rodeo should be proud of the on-going efforts to honor the 101 Ranch and the rich history of western America.

Rodeo Rodeo Will Continue for Years A Tradition That Began in 1905
From Larry Goodno, Chairman,101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation

This community is celebrating a historic event this year, the 101 Ranch Wild West Show 100th anniversary.

The show must go on, and so it did for 35 years. From 1905 to 1939 the 101 Ranch Real Wild West Show thrilled audiences and gave life to a bygone era. Many of the elements of the show are represented in the modern day version of the Greatest Show of the West, which is celebrated annually in Ponca City, Oklahoma as the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

This year's Rodeo marks the 46th year of its return to the Ponca City area when the Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce assigned the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee to have the rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960.

The 101 Wild West show and today's rodeo athletes and rodeo performances all over the country are similar in many ways. You take the best and give them the time and resources and they will provide spectacular feats of athleticism of man and animals.

To me, that is what makes the sport of rodeo so spectacular, it thrills and captivates all.

The Ponca City 101 Wild West Rodeo board members hope you enjoy the show, and reflect on the Miller Brothers and each of the performers of one of the greatest shows of its time.

Keep updated on all the happenings of the current 101 Wild West Rodeo at www.101wildwestrodeo.com.

Thanks to each and everyone of you for being such great supporters of our 101 Wild West Rodeo — with your help, the tradition continues.

Leading The Way
Back to the rodeo for their third year is the 101 Wild West Rodeo Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women will be leading the grand entry each night.

 They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines. This years team (left to right) is Team Captain Ñ Janie Campbell, Rhonda Bennett, Susie Powell, Mary Tapp, Karen Evans, Lezlee Locke, Karen Ingels and Lynn Curfman.

 

 

Rodeo Announcer for the 101 Wild West Rodeo Has Been At It For Many Years

One of the most vocal partners in the success of any rodeo is that of the rodeo announcer and keeping you informed again this year from the first moment to the very last will be Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid handling the microphone duties of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Phillips is no ordinary announcer. He brings over 35 years of veteran announcing experience into the arena of professional rodeo.

Quail Dobbs, one of pro rodeo's funniest clowns, perhaps most accurately describes the key to Lynn Phillips announcing success as being the fact that "this man was vaccinated with a Victrola needle."

Indeed. Few would argue. The smooth and entertaining announcing style of Phillips has carried his career to the National Finals Rodeo, the National Circuit Finals Rodeo, the Old Timers National Finals Rodeo, the Women's National Finals Rodeo, AQHA World Show, and Area Reigning Horse Futurity.

Here's a switch. During the week, he calls the shots in the tense, sterile arena of a hospital operating room. But on weekends, Dr. Lynn Phillips trades his stethoscope and surgical greens for a silver felt cowboy hat, a silver belt buckle and a silk bandanna and picks up a microphone as a professional rodeo announcer.

During his career as a rodeo announcer, Lynn can truthfully say, "I've announced everywhere from Wahoo to Kalamazoo." A few years ago, he announced a rodeo in the Wings Hockey Stadium in Kalamazoo, Mich., and then he had the pleasure of announcing the PRCA rodeo in Wahoo, Neb. Lynn commented, "Traveling is one of the things I enjoy most about announcing."

Medicine can't match his weekend rodeo hobby for excitement, "I still get butterflies before I start announcing," Phillips smiles, "but unlike years ago, now they fly in formation."

As long as this announcer is behind the microphone, you will probably never hear the question "Is there a doctor in the house?"

Bullfighters Offer Protection

They were clowns in the beginning, almost literally. Their job was to entertain and to provide comic relief. Protecting the cowboy was almost secondary.

Today they still dress like clowns, but they are bullfighters first and most importantly. And they are often the difference between life and death.

Bullfighters are in the first line of defense for the bull rider. The bullfighter is responsible for distracting the bull while the cowboy regains sense of direction and escapes to safety after a fall or dismount. Today's bullfighter, far from being a clown, is so serious about his job he routinely places his own life in danger in an effort to protect the cowboy.

The modern bullfighter is also an accomplished athlete, a master of timing and agility.

And fittingly, he has his own world championship to pursue. About two decades ago, bullfighters began informally competing among themselves, challenging each other to push the limit on daredevil stunts against the bulls.

Now, thanks to the Wrangler Bullfight Tour, Bullfighters compete for their own world championship.

On the Wrangler tour, the bullfighter goes one-on-one against the bull for 70 seconds. The bullfighter is judged on his willingness to expose himself to risk and on his aggressiveness. His objective is to stay as close as he can to the bull throughout the fight.

Bullfighters have elevated the sport by employing spectacular maneuvers such as jumping over a charging bull. Like the riders, the bullfighters score higher when the bull is more aggressive.

Bullfight bulls are bred to be smaller, quicker and more agile than those used for riding. They can compete for years and like their human counterparts, learn form their mistakes and improve with experience.

Rivinius Shows Determination, Style
Josh Rivinius has a passion for the sport of rodeo. He provides one major function, and that is cowboy protection. It is his job to keep the Bullrider out of harms way in the rodeo arena and put his life on the line for a fallen cowboy.

Josh was born and raised in a rodeo family as well as being a cowboy. He has competed in rodeo his whole life starting with little britches rodeos on to high school rodeo, amateur ranks, and then furthered his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter.

Josh has competed in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events, and 1997 he started bullfighting and has become his biggest achievement. Josh has earned respect of the bullriders and peers and has a ring of honors to follow.

He is very familiar with the rodeo industry and has a dedication to the sport and cowboy way of life. Josh has established himself as a premier Professional Bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability and cowboy protection in the rodeo arena and professionalism and hard work where ever he may go. 2003 will be his 7th year of fighting bulls and is looking forward to a successful 2003 season and future.

Josh's rodeo accomplishments include:

5x -- North Dakota Rodeo Association (NDRA) Bullfighter of the year, 1998-1999- 2000-2001-2002.

5x -- NDRA Finals Bullfighter 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002.

4x -- North Dakota High School Finals Bullfighter 1998,1999, 2000, 2001.

2x -- Badlands Professional Bull riders Finals Bullfighter 2001, 2002.

2x -- Montana High School Finals Bullfighter 2001, 2002.

2x -- Great Plains Indian Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2x -- Beauty and the Beast Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2x -- We Be Bull Riding Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2002 -- Buck Fest Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).

2001 -- North Dakota Rough Rider Association Bullfighter of the year.

2001 -- North Dakota (RRA) Finals Bullfighter.

2001 -- Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).

2001 -- Bull Blast Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).



Kick Up a Little Dust With This Bullfighter
If you are looking for exciting bullfighting and crowd-pleasing performances, look no further than Dusty Essick. Dusty has been fighting bulls professionally since 1994. He has been blessed with a successful career right from the start, working events all over the nation-including PRCA major rodeos, professional bull riding events and freestyle bullfighting competitions. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

In the arena, Dusty's top priority is protecting cowboys in the bullriding competition. Dusty has earned the confidence and trust of all the top bullriders across the country. They know that he will do whatever it takes to keep them safe.

Dusty also has a deep passion for freestyle bullfighting and remains active in bullfighting competitions. He knows there's nothing better for maintaining his skills than dueling one-on-one with these four-legged aggressive athletes.

Dusty's rodeo accomplishments include:

2001 -- World Championship Bullfight Finals Champion.

2001 -- Copenhagen Cup Summer Tour Finals Bullfighter -- Dallas, Texas.

2001 -- Salinas, California Bullfighting Champion.

7th Overall In The 2000 Wrangler Bullfight World Standings.

1996 -- Summer Olympics Exhibition Bullfighter -- Atlanta, Ga.

1996 -- NFR Bull Sale Bullfighting Champion.

Barrelman, For Safety's Sake

Whether it is after a successful 8-second ride or in the midst of a twisting turn just out of the gate, bull riders have to find their way to the ground - and to safety. But the riders don't face this challenge alone. A brave and athletic group of professionals known as bullfighters and barrelmen are essential to the riders' escape.

Though a barrelman’s attire is similar to that of a bullfighter, his presence in the arena serves a much different purpose. A barrelman’s duty is to entertain the crowd during the “down time” that is inherent to the sport of bull riding. When bulls are being loaded or the show is on hold due to unexpected breaks, a barrelman takes over and amuses spectators with impromptu dance routines or comical dialogue with the event’s announcers. The barrelman often can be found hanging around or in a custom-made barrel placed in the arena’s center. The barrel not only protects the barrelman from a charging bull but also provides bull riders with an island of safety if he is bucked off far from the arena fence or bucking chutes.

While they may look like funny-faced clowns in bright tights and baggy shorts, their job is no laughing matter. The mission of every bullfighter and barrelman is to divert the bull's attention away from the exiting rider by whatever means possible. For a bullfighter, that may mean jumping on top of a moving bull to free a bull rider's hand or sprinting jaggedly across the arena to distract a charging bull.

Working from an open-ended barrel, the barrelman serves as a diversion for an angry bull. It may look like the best seat for close up action, but the barrel with the barrelman inside often ends up in the path of an incoming bull - pushed there by the bullfighter in an effort to provide escape time for a downed or injured rider.

These skilled athletes not only risk their lives to save riders, the bullfighters and barrelmen are an exciting and entertaining part of all rodeo performances. They perform tricks and banter with the announcers to entertain the audience.

Keith Isley - Rodeo Clown, Barrel Man & Specialty Act
Rodeo clown Keith Isley warns spectators that "the first time you see my act, you may think it's alcohol related -- but it's not."

 

Isley spends a lot of time falling off his horse and standing on the saddle during his comedy trick-riding act. And don't be surprised when he ends up on his head -- in the saddle.

He hails from North Carolina, generally a non-traditional rodeo state, but that hasn't hindered this rodeo clown's advancement over the years. Isley is a four-time winner of the PRCA's "Specialty Act of the Year," five time finalist for "Coors Man in the Can," five time finalist for "Clown of the Year," and winner of "Comedy Act of the Year" in 2001.

Born October 9, 1957 in Reidsville, North Carolina.

Keith Started his rodeo career in 1972 at the age of 15 competing in the junior rodeo division in the bareback riding and bull riding. He also tried his hand at bullfighting. It got to the point where he enjoyed the bullfighting (protecting the cowboys) more than the competition. That's more or less how his career as a contract performer began. Now he's 47 and been doing it ever since.

Keith had no desire to tell jokes or perform clown acts. Being somewhat shy, he found the large audiences intimidating. However, after a period of time he found that the baggy pants and make-up that he wore provided him a comfort shield between himself and the spectators. Slowly but surely, he began telling jokes and performing clown acts.

Some of his comedy routines consist of Trick Roping, High Impact-Low Impact aerobic workout, various animal routines and Trick Riding.

Acts such as these have made it possible for Keith to make rodeo entertainment a full-time career.

His travels have taken him throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and Canada.

He loves to entertain, but more importantly, he takes seriously his role of keeping cowboys safe.

"Protection of the cowboy -- that's what I like," Isley said.

Clowning is a full-time, year-around job that keeps Isley on the road for much of the year.

The key to his success is hard work and enjoying what he does, Isley said. "It doesn't seem quite like a job," he said.

Isley said 1999 was the highlight of his career. That's when he first won the PRCA "specialty act of the year." It was the first time a clown had ever won the award. He has won it three more times since.

Throughout his career, Isley said he has broken bones, dislocated his shoulder and gotten his teeth knocked out. "Every time you nod your hat in the arena, it could be your best ride or your last," Isley said. "Anything in rodeo is dangerous. If you start to think about it, you better quit. It's best not to dwell on it."

Accomplishments:

1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, & 2004 PRCA Specialty Act of the Year

Top five finalists for "COORS MAN in the CAN" program 1998, 1999 & 2000

Top five finalists for "Clown of the Year" 1997,1998,1999 & 2000

First Frontier Circuit Finals 1995, 1998 & 1999

South East Circuit Finals 1996

Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo 1999 & 2000

 Isley and his BULL FIGHTERS provide a line of defense for bull riders in the arena. While they swap one-liners with rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips, they also perform the important task of distracting the bulls and keeping them away from the riders.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005 Will Be The Grand Marshal
On Aug. 14, 2004, Ashley Van Hoesen was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005.

Born and raised in Ponca City, Ashley is the daughter of Everette and Sonja Van Hoesen.

After graduating in the spring of 2004 from the University of Oklahoma with a Bachelor's Degree in Business Marketing, Ashley decided to chase her dreams in the rodeo arena. Growing up with the rich rodeo heritage of the World famous Miller Brother's 101 Ranch in Ponca City and her own family's ranching and farming tradition, she decided to lend her hand to the preservation of the American Cowboy.

Ashley is excited to represent her home state of Oklahoma throughout the state of Oklahoma throughout the Prairie Circuit and the United States, as well as at the Miss Rodeo America Pageant.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005 has been named as Grand Marshal for the 2005 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade scheduled for Saturday.

"I was born in Ponca City and as far back as I can remember, the best memories I have were when my family would attend or be in the rodeo parade. As a little tyke, I remember riding in the police car with my dad or being pulled behind in a small wagon.

"Then as my brother and I got older, he would ride our lawn mower and pull my friends and me in a trailer. In my high school years — I got to ride in our carriage or ride a horse," she relates.

"So now, getting to be Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005 has been great and being the Grand Marshal for the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade is just the icing on the cake. I will ride with great pride as the 'Grand Marshal' of this year's rodeo parade. The parade of parades — celebrating 100 years of Rodeo History.

101 Rodeo Off to a Fast Start With Pre-opening Slack Round
If all goes as well the next three nights at the 101 Wild West Rodeo as did the slack competition, rodeo fans are in for quite a treat as the rodeo officially opens the three-night stand tonight at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena.

Billed earlier in the week as a 6 p.m. start for slack on Wednesday, girls barrel racing actually took over the arena at 5 p.m. for almost an hour ahead of the timed stock events that included a two go-round of steer roping, and all of the first go-round in tie-down roping, steer wrestling and team roping. It ended right at 12:30 a.m. today.

But results from the events held Wednesday give a clear indication that fans will certainly enjoy the rodeo on any of the three regular nights, as bull riding, saddle bronc riding and bareback bronc riding are added to the attractions of the 101 Wild West Rodeo as produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company. Activity begins at 8 p.m. each night, with Grand Entry, which will include the 101 Wild West Rodeo Drill Team leading the way.

Also included will be other special events, including wild cow milking, ranch hand bronc riding, and amateur team roping. But that's not all. There will be specialty acts including barrelman Keith Isley, who will provide much of the specialty acts as rodeo clown, and two bullfighters —Josh Rivinius and Dustin Brewer. Giving fans additional information throughout the night will be Dr. Lynn Phillips, Enid, who has been a regular announcer for the 101 Wild West Rodeo for many years.

In Wednesday's steer roping, where there were 40 entries, area participants did rather well. That would certainly include Ponca City native J. Paul Williams, who now calls Burbank home, when he had a 10.3 time in the first go-round that ended up first in that "go" for $1,187.50. Williams also finished with a total of 24.4 on two, for $593.75.

Former area roper Guy Allen, now of Santa Anna, Texas, and world champion in the event 18 times, also had an 11.0 in the first "go" for $445.31, which tied him for third with a Pawhuska roper, Shorty Garten. However, Garten picked up the slack in the second go, with an 11.5 that pushed his two-go mark to 22.5 and $1,187.50 first place money. Allen was not able to lasso his steer during the second go.

In the second "go" during the steer roping, J.P. Wickett of Sallisaw had a 9.5 for $1,187.50 top money. Finishing right behind were Scott Snedecor, Uvalde, Texas, 9.8 and $890.62; Lawson Plemmons, Clinton, Texas, with 10.0 and $593.75 and Pratt's Rocky Patterson, 10.2 for $296.87.

Besides Williams, Garten and Allen in the first go to win money, was Buster Record of Buffalo, 10.4 for second money at $890.62. The average, or best on two, behind Garten, were Record at 23.5, $890.62; Williams in third and then Cody Scheck, Buffalo, 25.0 for $296.87.

All 50 steer wrestling participants competed in the first go-round on Wednesday, and all will be back, split up for the three nights of regular rodeo. However, best in the first go, went to Ronnie Fields of Oklahoma City, who "bulldogged" his steer in 3.8. That'd be tough to beat anytime. For his effort, he took first place money of $941.29. He'll try, like all the others to either duplicate or be faster during one of the three nights of regular performance to capture the second "go" and into the average "on two."

Tied for second and getting $697.84 each were Lynndel Walters of Collinsville and Mickey Gee of Wichita Falls, Texas, at 4.1 Next was Stan Williamson of Okmulgee at 4.3 for $454.41; Justen Nokes of McCook, Neb., with 4.5 for $292.12, and Chancey Larson of Manhattan, Kan., with 4.7 for $162.29.

The tie-down roping saw Hunter Herrin of Apache with the only effort under the 10-second barrier, with an 8.2 for first money at $1,051.49. There were several under the 10-second time, but broke the barrier out of the chute (a speeding no-no). A total of 58 competed in the first go-round, with all faced with coming back one time in the regular rodeo. Second went to Kolby Ugeheuer of Columbus, Kan., with a 10.0 for $870.19; Bill Huber of Albia, Iowa at 10.2 for $688.90; Matt Yocham of Wann, 10.3 for $507.61; Ponca City's Barry Burk at 10.5 for $326.32; and Stephen Reagor, Tulsa, 10.6 for $181.29.

There were 46 team ropers trying to get first "go" money and set the stage for the rest of the rodeo performance. Best effort was that of Cody Graham of Everton, Mo., and partner Jeff Braun, Joplin, Mo., at 4.8 getting each of them $786.28. Next were Gabe Gwaltney, Farmington, Mo., and Ty Ferrell, Sikeston, Mo., with 5.3 for $589.71 each; and then a 5.4 by Pauls Valley ropers Ricky Bonner and Tom Miller for $393.14 each followed by near area, Bret Boatright, Mulhall and partner Coleman Proctor, Miami, with a 5.5 for $196.57 each.

Ponca Citians in the team roping included a 10.7 by Jerome Schneeberger, who has competed on the national level recently, and a 10.8 by Tyler Mayse.

Claiming the best in the slack for girls barrel racing was a 16.64 effort by Mary Burger of Pauls Valley, followed very closely by the 16.66 turned in by Courtney Barnfield of Wappapello, Mo. Phyllis Wells of Harrah had 16.69 and sits third in the event.

Early Lessons
JADEN SCHNEEBERGER, 2, shows off his roping moves in the 101 Wild West Rodeo arena Wednesday evening while grandpa Don Schneeberger, left, steadies his kid-size mount, Jelly Belly. Jaden is the son of Jerome Schneeberger, shown right, and Haley Schneeberger. Regular rodeo performances start this evening at 8 p.m.


 

 

 

 

 

Three Contestants for 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Face Many Activities
   
Kate Chambers   Leah Beth Fischer   Brandi Linde
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen.

Vying for the honor of 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen during this week's activities are Kate Chambers, Leah Beth Fischer and Brandi Linde.

The reigning Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen is Kimber Craighead.

A luncheon will be held at the Ponca Townsite Company, located at 116 North Fourth Street on Friday, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Guests will be given the opportunity to see queen contestants model outfits and hear their speeches, both requirements for Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Contest.

Horsemanship competition will also be held Friday, at the Play Pen Arena at 5 p.m. Guests will witness the queens perform a pattern on horseback, a question and answer session with judges, and a queen's run.

Saturday the queens will be at the Kids Rodeo in front of the Ponca City Library immediately after riding in the parade which starts at 10 a.m. They will be helping out with booths, signing autographs, and visiting with the kids.

Autograph sessions will also be held at Davis Moore and Corral West Saturday afternoon and at each nightly performance of the Rodeo.

Queen coronation will be held after the grand entry at Saturday's rodeo performance.

The queen's competition offers a wealth of gifts and prizes, including a handmade, hand tooled queen's saddle valued well over $1,200.

Numerous Ponca City merchants have donated awards and gifts for the queen, horsemanship and runner-up winners.

Ponca Tribal Member Rosetta LeClair has hand-beaded a traveling tiara and sash for the queen, keeping the Native American influence a part of the 101 Heritage.

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

The contestants are judged 40 percent on horsemanship, 30 percent on public speaking, 15 percent each on appearance and 15 percent on personality. The coronation will be during Saturday's performance.

Donated items for 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contestants 2005 (Buckets), are from a number of area merchants and rodeo enthusiasts: They include:

Betty's Boutique, Bodyworks Massage, Head Country, Dr. Jim and Judy Highfill, John's Apparel, Carey's Hallmark, The Prairie Rose, Bath & Body Works — Sharon Johnson, O'Reilly Auto Parts — Twayna Shields, Blanton Chiropractic Clinic, Ponca City Chili's Restaurant, The Buckle, Maurice's, Scrapbook Jungle, Taco Stop and Ponca City Townsite.

The buckets are provided by Brandt's Ace Hardware.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation expressed "thanks" to the following individuals, firms, and organizations who have contributed to the success of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contest.

Queen's Saddle, Tonkawa Indian Casino; Queen's Buckle, Blanton Chiropractic, Dr. Tim and Echo Blanton; Queen's Traveling Chaps, Leather, etc., Joyce Crouch; $300 gift certificate, ConocoPhillips; Queen and First Runner-up, Head Stall and Breast Collar, Garroutte Products; First Runner-up, Sterling Silver Bracelet, Cornerstone Restaurant; Horsemanship Winner, Handmade Leather Breast Collar — Custom Saddles, The Tarltons; Ticket Sales Winner, Tooled Leather Weekender Bag, Renee Cooper, Cooper Ranch Supply; Miss Congeniality, Hair-on purse, Osage Feed & Tack; Speech, Leather Pillow — Stacie Schneeberger Fox, Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2003; Contestant's Flowers, Carriage House Flowers; Queen's Sashes, Linda's Monogramming; Horsemanship Sponsor, Play Pen Arena, Van & Jeannie Gemmill.

The Pageant Director is Dr. Tim Blanton.

101 Wild West Rodeo Parade Line-Up Set

The 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, which starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, has a lengthy list of participants. Where they start, for the most part, will be west of Oak Street along West Grand Avenue and then head east along Grand Avenue, to Sixth and Seventh Street.

In block one, ahead of the first actual participants, will be escorts including the Ponca City Police Department, Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Kay County Sheriff's Department.

The Color Guards will also be in that area, as will the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade Marshal, Ashley Van Hoesen, who is Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005. Also, V.F.W. Post 1201 of Ponca City.

In block two, between Oak and Elm, will be clubs and organizations, plus Riders of the Cimarron, 101 Wild West Old-Timers and 101 Wild West Collectors.

Block three between Elm and Osage, will include the 101 Rodeo Foundation, Rodeo Clowns, Rodeo Officials (who are to meet at Trout Funeral Home to load in Dodge trucks), 101 Rodeo Queen Contestants, 101 Wild West/Miller Brothers (relatives and descendants), Go-Carts and Mini-Choppers, and Politicians and dignitaries.

The block between Osage and Palm, block four, has been reserved for the Ponca City High School Band, who are to park and meet at Dollar General; along with Cheerleaders and Po-Hi Steppers.

Block five, between Palm and Lake, will include Kaw Lake Queens, Blackwell Tulip Festival Queens, Classic Cars, Corvette Club, Old Cars, Christian Motorcycle Group and Wheel Sport of Ponca City.

Block 6, between Lake and Ash, will include Fire Department/trucks and extra floats, including Kinder Campers, etc. Block 7 between Ash and Birch, with parking on the south side of Grand Avenue, will be Boy Scouts and Girl Scout groups, Ambucs float, Elks float, Kiwanis float, Shriners and Cowley County participants. Between Birch and Peachtree, or Block 8, will be old tractors and other floats. Block 9, between Peachtree and Sunset, will include the One Arm Bandit, John Payne; Kay County Sheriff's Stage Coach and Cars, Sheriff Everette Van Hoesen; other stage coaches, teams of horses, rodeo queens and PRCA cowboys and cowgirls.

Block 10 at the Grand Avenue Church of Christ, will be the Tonkawa Casino truck, Round-Up Clubs and Saddle Clubs, plus the Out Back Club and etc.

Late Night Rodeo Action Provides Multiple Leaders
Sometimes, it just pays to stay for the final seconds of any sporting event, and Thursday's 101 Wild West Rodeo as produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company proved that point!

Take for instance, the last bull rider in the final event Thursday. Billed as Family Night, the 101 Rodeo Foundation could not have selected a better evening, with a breeze from the south and a full moon rising almost from the beginning of the show, those who stayed for that final rider got to see the best of that event.

There were seven contestants, and the first to make the ride, drew a 77 score from the judges. That was Lucas Dick of Manhattan, Kan., on Spinner Bait. However, there was one other rider to get a 75 shortly after that, with a 75 when Nathan Tull of Shawnee got the score on Crazy Snake.

However, the final rider of the night, prior to 67 contestants and teams in team roping, plus tie-down roping and steer wrestling finishing their efforts in "second go" of two-go events, Cord McCoy of Tupelo wowed the crowd while staying on Piggly Wiggly for a judge's score of 82. That'll be tough to beat during the next two nights, set for 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday.

Don't you just love those names of the bulls. Southern Hustle, Roan Wolf, Feelin Froggy and Boss Man would not allow riders to finish the rides, as they tasted the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena floor prior to the end of the required eight seconds. The rodeo foundation should certainly be complimented for its work at the arena prior to this week's rodeo. The arena has a new calf and steer chute, which has allowed quicker movement of the animals in preparation for whatever is called for.

And those who decided to slip away prior to the girls barrel racing really missed out on some very fast times in that event. The girls on their fast horses, took to the arena with eight showing up and every one had times dropped below the slack performances on Wednesday. However, one did knock a barrel over, to finish with a higher time at 21.48 but for the rest, all were between a really fast 15.73 posted by Chani Payne of Sulphur Springs, Texas, and 16.66 by Penny Deboer of Andover, Kan.

Payne presently is followed by Kasey Etbauer of Goodwell, 15.96; Karen Fountain, Lakeland, Fla., 16.09; Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 16.11 and Linda Kay, Lawrence, Kan., 16.13.

Following a great Grand Entry by the 101 Wild West Drill Team, and an Armed Forces Tribute, the crowd hardly settled down in their seats when the bareback riding contestants put on a good show. There was only one rider unable to stay on board, and the very first rider got things off to a really good time when Dustin Murray of Midwest City on Little Joe was scored 82. Next two to get scored, were Zach Dishman of Beaumont, Texas, 75 and Ryan Stutes, Sulphur, La., 72.

In Thursday's steer wrestling, Bob Kelly of Choctaw, had a 6.3 to go with Wednesday's slack of 4.7 for 11.0 on two. After slack was finished for some of the second go around at 1:05 a.m. today. Ronnie Fields of Oklahoma City had a 5.3 in the late night slack, to go with Wednesday's 3.8 and has a 9.1 on two. Justin Thompson of North Platte, Neb., continued his quick "bulldogging" with a 5.1 to go with 4.9 for a 10.0 and Nick Griffith of Hartselle, Ala., had a 5.2 to go with 5.1 for 10.3.

There could be some others with faster times on two either tonight or Saturday, so that event is really up for grabs.

Even the saddle bronc riders put on a show, when there were a total of 13 contestants in the arena. Best was 78 by Jon Clark of Pierre, S.D., on Stuart Little while next high was Curtis Garton, of New Zealand, with a 76 on Spring Fling.

Ponca City's Barry Burk put on a good show for the tie-down roping event when he recorded a 10.6. With a 10.5 during Wednesday's slack, Burk took the leader board spot while paid fans were watching, with an average at 21.1 on the two.

The 21.1 failed to officially stay on top after the Thursday slack. Columbus, Kan., roper Kolby Ungeheuer had a second 10.0 to go with Wednesday's time for a 20.0 on two and Hunter Herrin of Apache had a 12.0 to go with his first night 8.2 for an average of 20.2 on two.

Team ropers Tim Victory, Chelsea, and Cody Heflin, Locust Grove, had a 5.0 during the Thursday night performance. They had no-time in Wednesday's slack. Josh McMillan, Enigma, Ga., and Dustin Griffith, Hartselle, Ala., had a 9.8 to go with their Wednesday slack time of 6.5 for 16.3. However, Brady Garton and J.P. Wickett had a 7.0 to go with Wednesday's 6.0 for a two-head average of 13.0 while Paul Petska and Darrel Radacy had an 8.3 to go with 5.8 for 14.1 during late Thursday slack.

Rodeo fans were treated also to some really good efforts in amateur events. Jeff Schieber had a 67 during the local ranch bronc riding event sponsored by 7-Clans Casino. Best team in the wild cow milking, also sponsored by 7-Clans Casino, was the threesome of Jim Thomas, Russell Schieber and Jeff Schieber while second went to Kevin Krebbs, Jake Horine and Curtis Morphew. Best in the local team roping, sponsored by Kaw Nation Casino, was 7.2 from Barry Kinkaid and Paul Mays.

There were 23 contestants completing their two-go efforts during the slack Thursday, and 28 in tie-down roping. Team roping teams numbered 16.

Early Performers Set the Pace In 101 Wild West Rodeo Action
In what has been nearly perfect weather for the past three days, the 101 Wild West Rodeo wound down with the final night at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena Saturday night.

The Saturday performance was to be highlighted with the crowning of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen. Contestants were Kate Chambers, Leah Beth Fischer and Brandi Linde.

Earlier in the day, thousands lined the street along Grand Avenue, when the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade provided quite a show, in bright sunlight.

Those who participated Saturday night were having to really do their best in each event following Friday's performance. Wednesday slack, Thursday's regular performance and Thursday slack after that, provided excellent times and scores with excellent conditions in the arena, compliments of the work by the 101 Rodeo Foundation, headed by president Larry Goodno.

Friday's performance provided some new leaders in some events, and close to the top in others.

Jeremiah Diffee of Hatfield, Ark., provided the best effort in the rough riding stock of the Dell Hall Rafter H Rodeo Producing Company. Diffee rode Little Blue to a score of 81 in the saddle bronc riding event, to move into first place. That was best in the event Friday, surpassing the 78 recorded by Matt Elliott, of Valentine, Neb., on Thursday.

But the best any of the bareback bronc ride contestants could do was a 77 on Spade by Scotty NeSmith of Sharon, Tenn. It failed to surpass Thursday's 82 scored by Dustin Murray of Midwest City on Little Joe. And Thursday's 82 by Cord McCoy of Tupelo withstood the bull riding event participants, when the best on Friday were a pair of 75s, by Cooper Kanngiesser of Zenda, Kan., and Jeremy Taylor of Big Cabin, Okla.

Team ropers in the second go of that event found J.D. Clune of Edmond and Jace Crabb of Mangum post a 4.7 on Friday to move into first place. Best on two are Cody Graham and Jeff Brown, with 4.8 and 6.1 for 10.9. Nick Sartain of Yukon and Shannon Frascht of Alva with 5.1 on Friday moved into second at 11.8 as a result of their 6.7 effort in Wednesday's slack.

P.J. Spencer has an 8.7 in the second go of the tie down roping to lead. Jared Turner of Lawton did the trick on Friday in 9.0, but he had a 15.2 in slack on Wednesday, bumping him down the list on two. Kolby Ungeheuer of Columbus, Kan., still leads in the average on two, with a pair of 10.0s for 20.0.

Ronnie Fields of Oklahoma City remains the best so far on two in steer wrestling with slack times of 3.8 and 5.3 for a 9.1. Friday's best was a 5.0 by Ricky Huddleston of McAlester but he broke the barrier on Wednesday in slack and his 5.3 went to 15.3 for an average of 20.3. Black Mindemann of Apache had 5.2 as did Jeff Miller of Blue Mound, Kan., on Friday. Miller's efforts earned him a 10.2 on two.

None of the girl barrel racers could match the Thursday explosion of quick times, although there were a trio that did break 16. Best on Friday was June Holeman, Arcadia, Neb., with 15.80 followed by Delores Toole of Manter, Kan., with 15.86 and Kasi Prather, Ochelata, Okla., 15.99. Thursday provided the leader in Chani Payne of Sulphur Springs, Texas, with a nifty 15.73.

Amateur team roping saw two with times to go into Saturday's finals. They include the 14.2 by Mike Gilliland-Ray Bell and the 15.2 by Steve Griffith-Jody Denny.

Wild cow milking saw Kelly Ranch hands Cody Pontious, Tom Nichols and Thad Horn do the trick very quickly for first place, while Cole Engleking, Ryan Faulkenberg and Brady Burk just beat the clock for second.

Rain Fails To Dampen Efforts As Rodeo Crowns '05 Champs
Mid-afternoon rains Saturday may have kept some spectators from attending the final night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, but it certainly didn't hamper the efforts of the contestants.

And, despite a slight sprinkle throughout the night, the crowd, which was probably half the size of an intended number watched the crowning of Brandi Linde as 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen 2005.

 

The wetness in the arena may also have served as the excuse for not allowing a calf scramble for the youngsters, but safety first is one thing and getting quite muddy is another.

 

In all, it was a good finishing touch to one of the better 101 Wild West Rodeo's, as a result of hard work by 101 Rodeo Foundation committee chairs and their great numbers of volunteers. The arena floor was never better for the entire performance, with no dust and the rain settled what dust was expected after three earlier nights that had been held in excellent conditions as well.

 

Contestants working to get good times and good scores off the stock of Rafter H Rodeo Producing Company of Dell Hall, Tahlequah, made for an interesting rodeo during the entire three nights of regular performance, and two nights of slack.

Best Saturday performance in riding the rough stock was certainly handled by 2004 World Champion Billy Etbauer, who is originally from South Dakota, but now living in the Edmond area. Etbauer showed off his No. 1 style on a leaping, twisting Little Blue, in the saddle bronc riding event as judged by the arena officials at 83.

The performance earned Etbauer top money of $1,426.42. Second went to Jeremiah Diffee of Hatfield, Ark., with an 81 on Friday. He got $1,080.62. One other top score Saturday in the saddle bronc riding, with a total of six payoffs, was the 77 effort by Rudy Rudolf, of Winterset, Iowa, on Stuart Little.

The crowd was still coming in and settling down after the Grand Entry and show performance by the 101 Wild West Rodeo Drill Team when the bareback bronc riding got under way. It too was an event that ignited a good night, when Justin Williams of DeSoto, Kan., was the final rider and did it in style with an 82 on Little Joe. That tied him with the previous best of 82 by Dustin Murray of Midwest City, who earned that score Thursday. They each received $1,019.32 following the tabulations by the efficient Rafter H secretary, Shelley Hall.

The only other high finisher however on bareback broncs was a 77 turned in by Larry Carter of Ellsinore, Mo., on High Trails. That earned him a tie for fourth in the six payoff lineup.

Steer wrestlers had a bit of a difficult time, with only two completing the chore of grabbing the steer and making the pin. Cody Browne of Wilburton was the first to ride out of the chute, with his hazer and steer heading to the far end of the arena. The steer didn't get very far, when Browne stopped it and completed the task, in 5.3 seconds. That was one-tenth of a second out of the money in the second-go of the event. The only other to complete the task on Saturday was Brady Hageman, McCook, Neb., in 5.9.

That along with a 5.1 during Wednesday's slack, for 11.0 on two, earned him $81.14 in the average on a tie for sixth.

Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger returned to the competition Saturday in the tie-down and had a 10.4. That put him into a third place tie with fellow Ponca Citian Barry Burk, each at 21.1 and each worth $598.25. Colby Dorsey of Binger had an 11.4.

In team roping, Joey Carpenter of Rutledge, Ala., and Rodney Melton, Alamo, Ga., had 6.0 and as a result enjoyed at the payoff window, $196.57 each with an average of 12.4 on two.

Two Saturday girl barrel racers were able to break the 16-second barrier. That included the 15.90 by Mardee Hollenbeck of Pretty Prairie, Kan., and Kim Squires of Carnegie, Okla., in 15.97. In doing so, Hollenbeck took fourth for $732.57 and Squires was sixth for $450.81. Tops remained with Chani Payne, Sulphur Springs, Texas, who had 15.73 on Thursday and eventually earning $1,183.39.

Justine Atwine of Osmond, Neb., was the only bull rider to remain on board for the eight-second count, doing it on Lane's Pet, for a score of 75. That earned him a three way tie for third money, nabbing $503.81. Tops came from Thursday's Cord McCoy on Piggly Wiggly, for an 82 that earned $1,348.05.

101 Wild West Rodeo Official Results
Shelley Hall, Rafter H Secretary

Bareback Riding

1. (tie) Justin Williams, DeSoto, Kan., 82, $1,019.35; Dustin Murray, Midwest City, 82, $1,019.35.

3. Jared Keylon, Bover, Ark., 79, $632.70.

4. (tie) Scotty NeSmith, Sharon, Tenn., 77, $333.92 and Larry Carter, Ellsinone, Mo., 77, $333.92.

6. Zach Dishman, Beaumont, Texas, 75, $175.75.

Steer Wrestling

First Go

1. Ronnie Fields, Oklahoma City, 3.8, $941.29.

2. (tie) Lynndel Walters, Collinsville, 4.1, $697.84 and Mickey Gee, Wichita Falls, 4.1, $697.84.

4. Stan Williamson, Okmulgee, 4.3, $454.41.

5. Justen Nokes, McCook, Neb., 4.5, $292.42.

6. Chancey Larson, Manhattan, Kan., 4.7, $162.29.

Second Go

1. Bob Kelly, Choctaw, 4.7, $941.29.

2. John Kloeckler, unknown, 4.8, $778.99.

3. Ricky Huddleston, McAlester, 5.0, $616.70.

4. Justin Thompson, North Platte, Neb., 5.1, $454.41.

5. (tie) Jeff Miller, Blue Mound, Kan., 5.2, $113.60; Blake Mindemann, Apache, 5.2, $113.60; Nick Griffith, Hartselle, Ala., 5.2, $113.60; Bray Armes, Stephenville, Texas, 5.2, $113.60.

Average

1. Ronnie Fields, Oklahoma City, 9.1, $941.29.

2. Mickey Gee, Wichita Falls, Texas, 9.7, $778.99.

3. Justin Thompson, North Platte, Neb., 10.0, $616.70.

4. Jeff Miller, Blue Mound, Kan., 10.2, $454.41.

5. Nick Griffith, Hartselle, Ala., 10.3, $292.12.

6. (tie) Bob Kelly, Choctaw, 11.0, $81.14 and Brady Hagemann, McCook, Neb., 11.0, $81.14.

Saddlebronc Riding

1. Billy Etbauer, Edmond, 83, $1,426.42.

2. Jeremiah Diffee, Hatfield, Ark., 81, $1,080.62.

3. Jon Clark, Pierre, S.D., 78, $778.05.

4. (tie) Rudy Rudolf, Winterset, Iowa, 77, $410.63 and Wes Bailey, Tampa, Kan., 77, $410.63.

6. Curtis Garton, New Zealand, 76, $216.12.

Tie-Down Roping

First Go

1. Hunter Herrin, Apache, 8.2, $1,051.49.

2. Kolby Ungeheuer, Columbus, Kan., 10.0, $870.19.

3. Bill Huber, Albia, Iowa, 10.2, $688.90.

4. Matt Yocham, Wann, 10.3, $507.61.

5. Barry Burke, Ponca City, 10.5, $326.32.

6. Stephen Reagor, Tulsa, 10.6, $181.29.

Second Go

1. Jared Turner, Lawton, 9.0, $1,051.49.

2. Justin Maass, Giddings, Texas, 9.6, $870.19.

3. P.J. Spencer, unknown, 9.7, $688.90.

4. Matt Prichard, Victoria, Texas, 9.8, $507.61.

5. Kolby Ungeheuer, Columbus, Kan., 10.0, $326.32.

6. Jeff Miller, unknown, 10.3, $181.29.

Average

1. Kolby Ungeheuer, Columbus, Kan., 20.0, $1,051.49.

2. Hunter Herrin, Apache, 20.2, $870.19.

3. (tie) Barry Burk, Ponca City, 21.1, $598.25 and Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, 21.1, $598.25.

5. Matt Prichard, Victoria, Texas, 21.8, $326.32.

6. P.J. Spencer, unknown, 22.0, $181.29.

Team Roping

First Go

1. Cody Graham, Everton, Mo., and Jeff Braun, Joplin, Mo., 4.8, $786.28 each.

2. Gabe Gwaltney, Farmington, Mo., and Ty Ferrell, Sikeston, Mo., 5.3, $589.71 each.

3. Ricky Bonner, Pauls Valley and Tom Miller, Pauls Valley, 5.4, $393.14 each.

4. Bret Boatright, Mulhall and Coleman Proctor, Miami, Okla., 5.5, $196.57 each.

Second Go

1. J.D. Clunn, Edmond, and Jace Crabb, Mangum, 4.7, $786.28 each.

2. Tim Victory, Chelsea, Okla., and Cody Heflin, Locust Grove, 5.0, $589.71 each.

3. Nick Sartain, Yukon, and Shannon Frascht, Alva, 5.1, $393.14 each.

4. Colt Braden and Kollin Van Ahn, both unknown, 5.2, $196.57 each.

Average

1. Cody Graham, Everton, Mo., and Jeff Braun, Joplin, 10.9, $786.28 each.

2. Ricky Bonner, Pauls Valley and Tom Miller, Pauls Valley, 11.1, $598.71 each.

3. Nick Sartain, Yukon, and Shannon Frascht, Alva, 11.8, $393.14 each.

4. Joey Carpenter, Rutledge, Ala., and Rodney Melton, Alamo, Ga., 12.4, $196.57 each.

Barrel Racing

1. Chani Payne, Sulphur Springs, Texas, 15.73, $1,183.39.

2. June Holeman, Arcadia, Neb., 15.80, $1,014.33.

3. Delores Toole, Manter, Kan., 15.86, $845.28.

4. Mardee Hollenbeck, Pretty Prairie, Kan., 15.90, $732.57.

5. Kasey Etbauer, Goodwell, 15.96, $563.52.

6. Kim Squires, Carnegie, 15.97, $450.81.

7. Kassi Prather, Oechlata, 15.99, $338.11.

8. Audrey Ridgeway, Mannford, 16.07, $225.40.

9. Karen Fountain, Lakeland, Fla., 16.09, $169.05.

10. Sherri Lucas, Ochelata, 16.11, $112.70.

Bull Riding

1. Cord McCoy, Tupelo, Okla., 82, $1,348.05.

2. Lucas Dick, Manhattan, Kan., 77, $1,021.25.

3. (tie) Justin Altwine, Osmond, Neb.; Jeremy Taylor, Big Cabin; and Cooper Kanngeiser, Zenda, Kan., all with 75, $503.81 each.

6. Nathan Tull, Shawnee, 74, $204.25.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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