2006

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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WATCH HERE FOR A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2006

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 17th, 18th, & 19th

   
ANNOUNCER: Dr. Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Mayor Richard Stone
RODEO QUEEN: Kallie Sue Baker SPECIALTY ACT: The One-Arm Bandit & Company

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making a three-night performance run in Ponca City this year.

 

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be August 17th thru August 19th, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

The 2006 Rodeo will mark the 47th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo - the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends - the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven and the press box have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

The 2003 rodeo brought back to Ponca City the "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. The 2006 rodeo will attempt to bring the "Rodeo of the Year" prize back to Ponca City again.

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, which have included calf scramble, boot race, and other activities. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, in his fourth year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the three-night stand. Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president; Darleanna Wamecke as secretary and Raye Lynne Brown as treasurer. Starting with two rounds of steer roping and rodeo slack at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday August 16th, regular rodeo performances will run Thursday through Saturday, August 17th thru August 19th at 8 p.m. nightly. The 101 Rodeo Arena is located at the intersection of Ash and Prospect.

The official rodeo dance will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights following the performances at the Rockin' Horse Country Dance Club, north of Ponca City.

Back again to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. Also back this year will be the lighted score board, giving fans the latest in scorekeeping technology, helping to make this year an even more spectacular rodeo for first time spectators and veteran fans alike.

This year's rodeo, again produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company of Tahlequah, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a four-night plus slack rodeo. Hall a former contestant in both riding and timed events has spent 38 years in the stock contracting business; the last 25 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

Serving as Barrel man this year is Jay Stout, Rodeo Clown, & Barrel Man. Bullfighters are Josh Rivinius, 2001 Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter & Dustin Brewer, 2002 Prairie Circuit Finals Bullfighter.

Jay Stout local Ponca City citizen will be making his first appearance at the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year. Stout brings his rodeo experience including bullfighter, clown, barrel man.


Josh Rivinius Rivinius has competed in rodeo his whole life starting out in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events and finally furthering his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability; he has established himself as a premier bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

Like Rivinius, Brewer has one priority ... cowboy protection. Dustin Brewer AKA "The Dustman" brings his talents to the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year. Not only does he work protection for the cowboys but he has also worked as a funnyman and as a barrelman in the past. Brewer believes that today a person has to be more flexible to allow as many contracted rodeos as possible. Bringing the specialty act for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year is The One-Arm Bandit & Company, always a real crowd pleaser. Expect anything from the Bandit Gang when they come to town

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance. Reigning queen, Brandi Linde of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have many opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

"Rodeo Week" in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. Grand Marshal this year will be announced later. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the east end of Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock. Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year's rodeo. "Family Night" is Thursday with adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, & kids ages 12 & under FREE. Friday and Saturday performances are adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, kids ages 7-12 $5, & kids ages 6 & under FREE. Advanced tickets can be found at select local businesses.

101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Entries Sought

 

The 101 Rodeo Foundation is sponsoring its annual rodeo queen contest, Aug. 17-19.

It is open to any Oklahoma female resident between the ages of 13 and 23. Contestants cannot be married, have ever been married, or have any children. Miss Oklahoma Rodeo guidelines will be followed. The Queen Competition entry deadline is July 28.

 

To enter, contestants must either sell $400 in rodeo tickets or pay a $200 entry fee in lieu of selling tickets.

 

Qualifying contestants will be required to provide a publicity photo along with a biography sheet at the time of entering the contest. Judging is based on 40 percent horsemanship, 30 percent public speaking, 15 percent appearance, and 15 percent personality. Candidates must also be prepared to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo in the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo contest.

 

Activities for the candidates include a queen's luncheon and style show, parade participation, media and interview appointments, as well as appearance and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

 

Prizes include a Circle G barrel racing saddle and matching breast collar, a Red Bluff solid sterling silver belt buckle, $300 in gift certificates and a wealth of additional prizes donated by numerous local businesses and individuals.

 

Other prizes will be awarded to the first runner-up, horsemanship, speech, ticket sales, and Miss Congeniality contestants.

 

Handing down her 101 Wild West Rodeo crown is Brandi Linde from Pawhuska.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen competition has a history of queens who have gone on to win Miss Oklahoma Rodeo and Miss Teen Rodeo.

 

For further information, call Darleanna Warnecke at (580) 716-1057 or Echo Blanton at (580) 765-2482. If no answer, please leave a message, or visit the Web site at www.101wildwestrodeo.com for additional information and an application.

101 Rodeo Set For August 17-19

THE 2006 EDITION of the 101 Rodeo is set for Aug. 17-19 with sponsors and 101 Rodeo Foundation members preparing to make this year's event one of the best ever. Foundation president Larry Goodno, left, shakes hands with Ray Ball who presents a $6,000 contribution on behalf of major sponsor Kaw Nation South Wind Casino.

Rodeo Window Contest Set

 

Give Ponca the Business Committee of the Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a contest for the "Best Rodeo — Western Window Decorated Business."

 

All Ponca City Chamber Businesses are encouraged to decorate their businesses in celebration of the 101 Rodeo and also to allow employees to dress western Aug. 14-19.

 

Those planning to enter the Rodeo window decorating contest are asked to call the Chamber office 765-4400 for an official entry.

 

There will be prizes for the first three winners and the winners will receive a one night "box seat" at the Rodeo, which will seat eight.

One Armed Bandit Act Here Again

John Payne, born to a rancher in 1953, this Oklahoma cowboy has spent his entire life on a back of the horse, with dogs along side. He will be bringing his specialty act to the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the three night performances beginning Thursday.

The breed Florida cur head dogs, which he raises and trains himself, can trail and bayed, the meanest bovine in the woods or plains!

Cattle gathering expeditions have taken John as far south as Southern Florida, where alligators lay and wait for hot, thirsty dogs to come to the waters edge, to Georgia, where large timber companies like Weyerhaeuser harbor maverick cattle in brush and vines so thick that it is almost impossible to walk in, much less ride a horse. Then to New Mexico, the west coast of California and the vast plains of the Kansas Flint hills, where fattened cattle are gathered for market, sometimes weighing in excess of 1,100 pounds and proving to be a real pain to handle. And, of course, his native state of Oklahoma, where he has been in partnership with his dad and four brothers for the past 45 years.

Discovered on a ranch in Oklahoma by Walter Alsbaugh, John was hired to pen some bucking bulls that Walter had bought. The bulls didn't seem to know any boundaries, nor would they respect a cowboy on horse. But after a short while, they learned to respect John's Cur head dogs. They were penned and Walter was very much impressed with John's talent. This led to John's appearance in the rodeo arena.

John took the place of a electrician for one day, thinking the electricity was off. John sustained 7,200 volts for 10 seconds. The electricity exited his abdomen, leaving intestines showing. While the voltage was destroying his leg muscle, it burnt through his fingers, allowing John to fall to his death.

But John received CPR, licked his wounds for two months and went back to ranching. Through this shocking experience, John became The One Arm Bandit.

The One Arm Bandit and Company has now taken their legendary act throughout the United States and Canada. This act has been seen at some of the top horse shows and rodeos. Prince Phillip has expressed great appreciation of the horsemanship displayed and has invited John to Great Britain. This entertainment has been awarded PRCA Specialty Act of the Year in 1989-90-91-92-93-94-95 and 1996. Since then, the family tradition has been carried on by John's son Lynn and Daughter Amanda.

Rafter H To Produce 101 Wild West Rodeo Again

The Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company headquartered in Tahlequah, owned by Dell Hall, will again be the rodeo producer of the 101 Wild West Rodeo here this week.

Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys as well, providing stock for a three-night plus slack rodeo. Hall has spent the last 39 years in the stock contracting business and the last 26 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

A former contestant in both riding and timed events, Dell Hall knows that the draw-end of the business can either make or break a contestant. When contestants pull up to a rodeo, they need to draw an animal that they or any other contestant can place on to win money.

In respect for the rodeo as a whole, Hall tries to keep his stock as even as possible for all the contestants entered.

Most recent awards from the Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company have been in 1999 when the Prairie Circuit (Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska) named specific stock from the firm Saddlebronc of the Year and Bull of the Year. The 1998 PRCA Bucking Bull of the Year Skoalis King Kong was from Rafter H, and there have been numerous awards prior to that, including Bucking Bull of the Year in the PRCA in 1984 and 1981.

Other awards have gone back as far as 1979.

Kids Rodeo Saturday for the 7th Year

All You Rootin' Tootin' Cowboys & Cowgirls come join the fun at the 7th annual Kid's Rodeo at the Ponca City Library Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (or directly following the Rodeo Parade).

Events will include:

In the street (Grand Avenue)
11:00 until 1:00 - Don Long and the "Longshot Gang" sponsored by Conoco/Phillips.
11:30 - Stagecoach Holdup performed by Riders of the Cimarron sponsored by Friends of the Library.
12:00 - Native American Dancers sponsored by Pioneer Bank.

On-going events on the Library and Civic Center Lawns:
Hoppy Horse Corral sponsored by ConocoPhillips.
Stick Horse Flag Race sponsored by the Library.
Musical Hay Bales sponsored by Friends of the Library.
Money in the Hay sponsored by Eastman National Bank.
Horse Beanbag Toss sponsored by Friends of the Library.
Stagecoach Rides sponsored by Wells Plumbing and ConocoPhillips.
Mechanical Bull Rides sponsored by Ward's Air Conditioning Inc.
Rodeo Queens Autographs sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation.
Pony Rides sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation.
Tie the Ribbon on the Goat Tail sponsored by the Library.
Cow Patty Throw sponsored by the Library.
Dummy Roping sponsored by the Library.
Face Branding sponsored by Friends of the Library.
Cactus Hat Throw sponsored by ConocoPhillips.
Trick Roping Instructions sponsored by Friends of the Library.
Book Sale sponsored by Friends of the Library (lots of children's books).
101 Ranch Picture Display sponsored by 101 Ranch Collectors.
Children's Fingerprinting at the corner of Fifth Street and Grand Avenue.

Drinks and ice are furnished by: Albertson's, Quality Water, Walgreen's, Ponca City Discount Foods, & United.

Tank Provided by: Tractor Supply.

And there will be Prizes - Prizes - Prizes - Prizes.

Rodeo Announcer Plays Key Role

One of the most vocal partners in the success of any rodeo is that of the rodeo announcer and keeping you informed again this year from the first moment to the very last will be Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid handling the microphone duties of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Phillips is no ordinary announcer. He brings over 37 years of veteran announcing experience into the arena of professional rodeo.

Quail Dobbs, one of pro rodeo's funniest clowns, perhaps most accurately describes the key to Lynn Phillips announcing success as being the fact that "this man was vaccinated with a Victrola needle."

Indeed. Few would argue. The smooth and entertaining announcing style of Phillips has carried his career to the National Finals Rodeo, the National Circuit Finals Rodeo, the Old Timers National Finals Rodeo, the Women's National Finals Rodeo, AQHA World Show, and Area Reigning Horse Futurity.

Here's a switch. During the week, he calls the shots in the tense, sterile arena of a hospital operating room. But on weekends, Dr. Lynn Phillips trades his stethoscope and surgical greens for a silver felt cowboy hat, a silver belt buckle and a silk bandanna and picks up a microphone as a professional rodeo announcer.

During his career as a rodeo announcer, Lynn can truthfully say, "I've announced everywhere from Wahoo to Kalamazoo." A few years ago, he announced a rodeo in the Wings Hockey Stadium in Kalamazoo, Mich., and then he had the pleasure of announcing the PRCA rodeo in Wahoo, Neb. Lynn commented, "Traveling is one of the things I enjoy most about announcing."

Medicine can't match his weekend rodeo hobby for excitement, "I still get butterflies before I start announcing," Phillips smiles, "but unlike years ago, now they fly in formation."

As long as this announcer is behind the microphone, you will probably never hear the question "Is there a doctor in the house?"

'Man in the Can' and Two Associates

Jay Stout, 1989 graduate of Ponca City High School, will be the "Man in the Can" at this year's 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Jay was labeled "class clown" by teachers, classmates, and family members alike. With his dynamic combination of athletic ability and natural comedic talents and ability to capture audiences from young to old, he went from the wrestling mat in school to the rodeo arena and from grappling opponents to fighting bulls and making the Rodeo fans laugh.

Stout is in his 17th year as a professional rodeo clown. In 1999, he won the Barrelman competition at the 29th International Finals Rodeo.

Stout also enjoys wrestling, hunting, ranching, and training animals.

When Jay Stout was very young, his grandfather took him to his very first Rodeo in Pauls Valley. At age 10, while attending the 101 Ranch Rodeo in Ponca City, Jay met the Rodeo Clown before, during, and after the rodeo. It was then when he decided he wanted to be a rodeo clown and 24 years later, he will be performing at the very rodeo where his dream began.

Jay will be performing a variety of tasks, which include colorful dress acts, "funny to the bone" comedy acts, his famous barrelman routines, and the always-entertaining death-defying bull fighting antics.

A Native American Indian of Cherokee descent, Stout will be joined this year by his son, 10-year-old Daltyn, who will be performing comedy acts with his father. Daltyn has performed a Native American Hoop Dance here at the 101 Wild West Rodeo in 2002. He also performed in a variety of open and PRCA Rodeos.

Stout and his son recently returned from performances in Colorado, Pennsylvania, New York, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Josh Rivinius — has a passion for the sport of rodeo. He provides one major function, and that is cowboy protection. It is his job to keep the Bullrider out of harms way in the rodeo arena and put his life on the line for a fallen cowboy.

Josh was born and raised in a rodeo family as well as being a cowboy. He has competed in rodeo his whole life starting with little britches rodeos on to high school rodeo, amateur ranks, and then furthered his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter.

Josh has competed in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events, and 1997 he started bullfighting and that has become his biggest achievement. Josh has earned respect of the bullriders and peers and has a ring of honors to follow.

He is very familiar with the rodeo industry and has a dedication to the sport and cowboy way of life. Josh has established himself as a premier Professional Bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability and cowboy protection in the rodeo arena and professionalism and hard work where ever he may go.

Dustin Brewer — AKA The Dustman, from Elk City, Okla., started rodeoing at the age of seven. During high school, he rode barebacks and bulls and continued to do so for a few years.

Feeling he didn't have what it took to be a great rider, he turned his attention to the life long dream of being a rodeo clown and bullfighter. At the age of 19, Dustin started fighting bulls in the practice pen and also worked his first rodeo.

During the spring and fall of 1989, Dustin attended Rex Dunn's bullfighting school in Hastings, Okla. Rex Dunn, one of the most respected rodeo clown and bullfighters in the PRCA, taught Dustin the basic bullfighting skills.

Between 1989 and 1996, Dustin worked high school rodeos, open rodeos, bullridings and freestyle matches all over Oklahoma and Texas. Feeling he had what it took to go up to the professional level, Dustin applied for his Pro-Card. In January 1996 he was approved for his card and started his professional career.

Dustin brings his talents to the PRCA for the ninth consecutive year.

101 Wild West Rodeo Begins Here Thursday

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making a three-night performance run in Ponca City this year.

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo will be Thursday through Saturday, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect avenue at North Ash Street.

Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

The 2006 Rodeo will mark the 47th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven and the press box have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

The 2003 rodeo brought back to Ponca City the "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. The 2006 rodeo will attempt to bring the "Rodeo of the Year" prize back to Ponca City again.

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, which have included calf scramble, boot race, and other activities. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, in his fourth year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the three-night stand. Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president; Darleanna Wamecke as secretary and Raye Lynne Brown as treasurer.

Starting with two rounds of steer roping and rodeo slack at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, regular rodeo performances will run Thursday through Saturday.

The official rodeo dance will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights following the performances at the Rockin' Horse Country Dance Club, north of Ponca City.

Back again to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. Also back this year will be the lighted score board, giving fans the latest in scorekeeping technology, helping to make this year an even more spectacular rodeo for first time spectators and veteran fans alike.

This year's rodeo, again produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company of Tahlequah, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a four-night plus slack rodeo. Hall a former contestant in both riding and timed events has spent 38 years in the stock contracting business; the last 25 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

Serving as Barrel man this year is Jay Stout, Rodeo Clown and Barrel Man. Bullfighters are Josh Rivinius, 2001 Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter & Dustin Brewer, 2002 Prairie Circuit Finals Bullfighter.

Jay Stout is a local Ponca City citizen and making his first appearance at the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year. Stout brings his rodeo experience including bullfighter, clown, barrel man.

Josh Rivinius has competed in rodeo his whole life starting out in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events and finally furthering his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability; he has established himself as a premier bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

Like Rivinius, Brewer has one priority ... cowboy protection. Dustin Brewer AKA "The Dustman" brings his talents to the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year. Not only does he work protection for the cowboys but he has also worked as a funnyman and as a barrelman in the past. Brewer believes that today a person has to be more flexible to allow as many contracted rodeos as possible.

Bringing the specialty act for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year is The One-Armed Bandit & Company, always a real crowd pleaser. Expect anything from the Bandit Gang when they come to town.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance.

Reigning queen, Brandi Linde of Pawhuska, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have many opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

"Rodeo Week" in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. Grand Marshal this year will be Mayor Dick Stone.

The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the east end of Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock. Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year's rodeo. "Family Night" is Thursday with adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, & kids ages 12 & under FREE. Friday and Saturday performances are adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, kids ages 7-12 $5, & kids ages 6 & under FREE. Advanced tickets can be found at select local businesses.

Pre-Rodeo Entertainment By a Talented Youngster

When Lucas Ciliberti steps to the stage people don't know what to expect. There is no back-up band or CD player ready with Karaoke tunes. He takes the mike, holds it to his mouth and begins to sing acappella with his trademark blonde ponytail swaying to the beat.

Lucas was born to sing. He made his debut at only 18 months old when he sang, "God Bless America" at his brother, Nick's, ice hockey game while the family was living in Oregon. Since then, Lucas has sung the "National Anthem" for the following teams: Wichita, Kan., Thunder Ice Hockey, NW OSU Baseball, Enid Storm Basketball, the Oklahoma High school Basketball playoffs held at the Enid Chisholm Trail Expo Center and many other area sporting events.

Lucas was the feature singer for the Hennessey Rodeo, Hennessey Hometown Hootenanny, the Miss Northwestern State University pageant, and Enid's National Day of Prayer. He enjoys singing at a variety of events including retirement centers and nursing homes.

Most recently Lucas was chosen by the Minnesota Twins Baseball Organization to sing "God Bless America" at the Metrodome in Minneapolis during the 7th Inning Stretch in front of over 30,000 fans.

This summer Lucas attended the music camp conducted by the world-renowned opera singer, Leona Mitchell. She was surprised by the fact that he has never had any formal vocal training and was quoted as saying, "I think he was just born with this God given talent and he's just born to do this. I think he can go far. I just think he's got the full package."

In addition to performing, Lucas likes to be a kid. Riding his bike and peddle car, playing video games with his brother, building with Legos and reading are some of his favorite activities. When asked why he likes to sing, Lucas simply answers, "I sing because it makes people happy."

Rodeo Queen Sponsorships

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation expresses "thanks" to the following individuals, firms, and organizations who have contributed to the success of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contest.

Queen's Saddle — Million Dollar Elm Casino; Queen's Buckle — Blanton Chiropractic, Dr. Tim & Echo Blanton; Queen's Traveling Chaps — Leather, etc., Joyce Crouch.

$400 In Gift Certificates — ConocoPhillips; Queen's Head Stall, Breast Collar, & Cinch — Garroutte Products.

First Runner-up — Sterling Silver Bracelet, Cornerstone Restaurant; First Runner-up — Wool Blanket w/Engraved Leather, Laser Mills & Garroutte Products; Horsemanship Winner — Handmade Leather Breast Collar, Tarlton Custom Saddles, Tryon, Okla.

Ticket Sales Winner — Tooled Leather Weekender Bag, Perkins Family Restaurant; Miss Congeniality — Leather, Hair-on Day Planner, Osage Feed & Tack; Speech Winner — Leather Pillow — Dennis Schneeberger Custom Mowing; Contestant's Flowers — Carriage House Flowers; Queen's Sashes — Creative Monogramming; Horsemanship Sponsor — Play Pen Arena, Van & Jeannie Gemmill; Host Hotel — Fairfield Inn; Pageant Director — Dr. Tim Blanton.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen Is From Mustang

 

Reba Baker is the 17-year-old daughter of Ronnie and Karen Baker of Mustang.

She is a senior at Mustang High School where she plays volleyball, sings in the varsity choir, and is a member of National Honor Society and Student Council.

 

In her free time, she enjoys team sorting with her dad and sister as well as riding with the Freedom Riders 4-H varsity drill team and coaching the junior varsity drill team.

 

Reba has also been a 3-year member of the Western Oklahoma Honor Choir, and a 2005 member of the Women's All-State Chorus. Her future educational goals include attending Southern Nazarene University and obtaining a degree in music education, and then becoming a full time music minister.

 

Reba says, "I am so excited about becoming the 2006 Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen. There is nothing else I would rather do than to travel all over one of the finest states in our nation to represent the greatest show on dirt."

 

One of her experiences is likely to be in the Grand Entry and parade of the 101 Wild West Rodeo this week in Ponca City. The rodeo is set for three performances, Thursday through Saturday, and the parade will be held along Grand Avenue at 10 a.m. Saturday.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess

Energetic, creative, dedicated, hard working, mature beyond her years is just a few words that describe Kaely Jessie Zimmerman.

 

August 2005, she was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess 2006. This was one of the greatest events in her life. Kaely knows and understands the responsibility this title brings and is very excited to represent the PRCA and make new friends.

 

Hard work is nothing new to this 10-year-old cowgirl. When Kaely is not helping her family raise and show Boer goats, she is busy doing her part to raise and train seven horses, one being her best friend Lady. Kaely also has a job working weekends at the A Lazy C Ranch where she is learning to improve her riding skills.

 

When she is not honing her skills in barrel racing, she is very active in the Line Dance Club, Wild Cats Bowling League, and the 4-H Horse Club. Kaely is an Honor student at Lone Grove Elementary School and has maintained this status since first grade. Kaely is competitive; she won the All-Around Pee Wee Horsemanship and Grand Champion Pee Wee Goat Showmanship at the Carter County Fair in 2005.

 

Kaely plans on becoming a world champion barrel racer, attending Oklahoma State University, and attaining the title of Miss Rodeo America. Her love for the sport of rodeo is why she wants to eventually become a rodeo commentator. That may seem like a lot for a 10 year old, but Kaely reminds everyone you have to "Dream Big!"

 

Kaely resides in Lone Grove with parents, Gary and Michelle Zimmerman, and her brother Brett.

Reigning Queen Had Quite a Year

The reigning 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen from the 2005 rodeo is Bandi Linde.

 

"I cannot believe that the time has already come to hand over my title," Brandi said recently.

 

"The past year has been so great. The opportunity that I have had to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo has been not only a once in a lifetime opportunity, but also one of the best experiences of my life."

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo is one of the biggest and well known rodeos in the state of Oklahoma, and to be the queen of this rodeo is truly an honor, she admitted.

 

"Throughout the last year, beginning with the pageant, I have met many great people. I feel that I have gained so much experience in the past year representing the 101 Wild West Rodeo."

 

"I would like to thank my parents for the support, the rodeo committee for producing such an incredible pageant, and the many generous people who sponsor the queen pageant because without them none of this would ever have been made possible."

Special Performers

101 WILD WEST RODEO Women's Drill & Grand Entry Team will be back to the rodeo for their fourth year. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women will be leading the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines. This year's team left to right is Team Captain — Janie Campbell, Lynn Curfman, Lezlee Locke, & Rhonda Bennett.

 

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2006

Jennifer Lee Peverley was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2006 while representing the Claremore Will Rogers Stampede Rodeo. The rodeo reflects on the character and tradition of its native son, Will Rogers, and his characteristics are traits adopted by Jennifer.

 

The 21-year-old was born in Claremore to Andrea and Bruce Peverley. She grew up in the agricultural world of Angus cattle and the American Quarter horse while working with her two brothers and parents in the family business.

 

Jennifer received her Associates Degree in Ag Business from Northeastern A & M in Miami, Okla., where she was named Graduate of Distinction and received the Cream of the Crop Award. She was also a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the Aggie Society and the Equine Club.

She is a junior at Oklahoma State University, pursuing a degree in Agricultural Communications. Jennifer was a member of the NEO and OSU equine judging teams. She desires to judge for breed associations while working in journalism and broadcasting for the equine and agricultural industry.

 

Jennifer holds dearly the heritage of her Sooner state from its vast agriculture lands to the cultural and educational opportunities accorded its people. Her desire to represent her home state enables her to promote its natural beauty, resources available in oil, gas, timber, and agriculture, as well as enjoy the bountiful talents of its people. Jennifer places deep value in family lifestyles, patriotism and spiritual belief.

 

Jennifer will represent Oklahoma at the 2007 'Miss Rodeo America' pageant in Las Vegas in conjunction with the December, Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Six Queen Contestants for 101 Wild West Rodeo

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen.

 

The opportunity to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo as queen for a year is one of Oklahoma's highest honors. Many of our queens have gone on to reign as Miss Oklahoma Rodeo as well.

 

In an effort to prepare our queen for the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Pageant all contestants are expected follow all rules, regulations, and eligibility requirements. The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen will also be required to attend and represent our rodeo at various events throughout the year. Participation in the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Pageant is also required.

 

The pageant's events consist of horsemanship, speech, modeling, impromptu questions, and interview. Contestants need to also be prepared for possible appearances for sponsors, media interviews and the rodeo parade.

 

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

 

The contestants are judged 40 percent on horsemanship, 30 percent on public speaking, 15 percent each on appearance and personality. The coronation will be during Saturday's performance.

 

Kallie Sue Baker - Kallie is the 16-year-old daughter of Ronnie and Karen Baker of Mustang. In her spare time she enjoys team sorting with her dad and sister, barrel racing, pole bending, and riding with the Freedom Riders 4-H Drill Team.

 

She is an active member of the Heart of Oklahoma Youth Rodeo Association and the American Barrel Racers Association.

 

Kallie says it would be an honor for her to represent such a prestigious rodeo and as Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen.

 

Kelsey West Cox - Kelsey West Cox is the 19-year-old daughter of Randy and Debra Cox of Talala and Kathy Cox of Chelsea. Kelsey was a senior at Oologah High School graduating this spring where she was on the Superintendent's Honor Roll and Career Tech Competency Accounting Service award.

 

She is enrolled at NEO for the fall of 2006 where she plans on receiving her teaching degree in lower elementary education. She also plans on competing in the college rodeos.

Some of the awards that she has accomplished is 2004 Tulsa State Fair 1st Place Team Penning, 2005 OMRUC Queen, Horsemanship, voted Miss Congeniality, and Reserve Champion for OMRUC, 2006 OMRUC Queen, Horsemanship, voted Miss Congeniality, and 1st Runner-up in 2006 at the Cavalcade Queen Pageant.

 

Kelsey is a member of the NBHA and is the secretary, time keeper for the weekly Team Roping Jackpots for OMRUC.

 

Kelsey enjoys riding horses, barrel racing, helping her Dad and Papa work cattle plus being with her family and friends.

 

Leah Beth Fischer - Leah Beth Fischer is the 23-year-old daughter of Milton and Judy Fischer.

 

Leah Beth grew up on the race track, where her mother was a jockey and her father was a horse trainer and owner.

 

She began competing in rodeos and horse shows at age three, and has competed and won awards in barrel racing, pole bending, breakaway roping, and numerous other events. She continues to compete in barrel racing and horse shows. She also enjoys playing golf and singing.

 

Leah Beth graduated from Oklahoma State University in 2004 with a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology and is currently working on her Master's Degree in Forensics through Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences.

 

She also works as a Case Manager at Edwin Fair Community Mental Health Center in Ponca City. Leah Beth enjoys working with both people and animals, and would like to begin a career in a correctional setting, as well as train horses for barrel racing and break colts.

 

Leah Beth is a member of the Newkirk Range Riders and the Shoo Fly Saddle Club. She enjoys training horses with her mother and also enjoys trail riding. She was the 2002 Sedan Rodeo Queen and is the reigning Newkirk Rodeo Queen.

 

Brandi Sue Hewitt - Brandi Sue Hewitt is the 22-year-old daughter of Steven and Marla Hewitt.

 

She graduated from Oilton High School in 2002 as class Salutatorian. While in high school she was a member of Student Council and played basketball. In 2002 she was named to the Oklahoma Girls Basketball Coaches Association All State team.

 

After high school she attended Mid America Christian University for two years where she played basketball and volunteered as a seventh grade girl's basketball coach at Community Christian School in Norman.

 

She currently lives on her family's ranch where they raise horses. She is a student at Oklahoma State University majoring in Studio Art with Education Certification.

 

She enjoys barrel racing and trail riding with her family. Some of her other hobbies include making beaded jewelry and learning to do leather work.

 

She has many goals that include owning and running an arena with training and boarding facilities and having her own spur making shop.

 

She recently became interested in participating in rodeo queen contests after seeing the opportunities that holding a title can offer and the ability a queen has to promote rodeo and the western way of life. She says it would be a privilege to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo as its queen.

 

Sarah Spears - Sarah Spears is the daughter of Terry and Shirley Spears from Cleveland, Okla.

She is an Honor Student at Cleveland High School and participates in track, the Competitive Cheer Team and Freshman Cheerleader. She is an active member of FFA and a member of the Pawnee County 4-H Horse Club.

 

She was the 2005 Miss Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Queen and the 2005 Miss Pawnee Bill Rodeo Teen Queen.

 

Sarah enjoys encouraging young children into the sport of rodeo, while promoting the true fun of the sport of rodeo to all Oklahomans.

 

Tori Walton - Tori Walton is the 16-year-old daughter of Glenn and Lora Walton of Newkirk.

 

She is a member of the Martha Washington 4-H club, the Ark City Mavericks Saddle Club, the Shoe Fly Saddle Club, and the Newkirk High School National Honor Society. Tori is in her 2nd year as an officer in the Newkirk chapter of FFA and enjoys livestock judging, showing swine, and horses.

 

Tori has received the honor of being Arkansas City Mavericks Rodeo Princess for 2003 and 101 Wild West Rodeo Runner Up in 2003.

Public Invited To Several Queen Events

Rodeo queens will be arriving in Ponca City Thursday. Several queens' activities are scheduled and the public is invited to attend.

A luncheon will be held at the Ponca Townsite Company, located at 116 North Fourth Street on Friday, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Guests will be given the opportunity to see queen contestants model outfits and hear their speeches. Both are requirements for the Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Contest. Lunch will consist of a deli buffet at $10 per person.

Horsemanship competition will also be held Friday, at the Play Pen Arena at 5 p.m. Guests will witness the queens perform a pattern on horseback, a question and answer session with judges, and a queen's run.

Saturday the queens will be at the Kids Rodeo in front of the Ponca City Library immediately after riding in the parade, which starts at 10 a.m. They will be helping with booths, signing autographs, and visiting with the kids.

Autograph sessions will also be held at Davis Moore and Corral West Saturday afternoon and at each nightly performance of the Rodeo.

Queen coronation will be held after the grand entry at Saturday's rodeo performance.

Slack Time Gives Fans Lots of Rodeo To Watch
By BOB PATTERSON - News City Editor

 Those die-hard rodeo fans were treated with some really good efforts of cowboys and cowgirls at the slack performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Wednesday.

 

But they had to be there shortly after 5 p.m. and stay until after 11 p.m. to witness some of the best runs (girls barrel racing) or timed cowboy events.

 

The three-night performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo actually begins tonight at 8 p.m. in the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located just off North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue. Indications from rodeo officials of the Rafter H Rodeo Producers, with Dell Hall in charge, and according to Shelley Hall, secretary, are that fans will have a great time as participants coming are well known.

 

Things get under way at 8 p.m. with the Grand Entry (101 Wild West Drill Team) and then it's down to business of bronc riding, steer wrestling, roping, barrel racing and ending with the usual — bull riding.

 

In between many of the events will be some specialty acts including "Man in the Can" Jay Stout of Ponca City (twice), local ranch bronc riding sponsored by Paradise Casino, calf scramble for youngsters, local team roping sponsored by Kaw Southwind Casino, and following the girls barrel racing, the One-Armed Bandit and Company.

 

Shortly after 5 p.m. Wednesday during the slack performances, first girls barrel racing performer Shauni Leftwich of Winfield, Kan., put a 17.60 time on the scoreboard and it stood up through the first five. But tops for the night came from an Arcadia, Neb., rider, June Holeman, who had a 17.35. That will be tough to beat throughout the rest of the three-night performances. Leftwich remained in second, with two others breaking the 18-second barrier, including Shelley Ward of Bartlesville, 17.83 and Rena Grissom of Sulphur with 17.88.

 

Fans were then treated with more than two hours of steer roping, which will not be seen during the three-night regular performances. Cowboys participated in two rounds and included a total of 42, which makes it 84 steers leaving the chute trying to keep from getting roped and tied. There were some that made it, resulting in only nine cowboys getting a no time on both steers. All of the other participants at least caught one steer and some were able to get both, for final times that awarded payoff.

 

There were payoffs in each of the two rounds as well as the final times.

 

Best in the first round was Marty Jones of Hobbs, N.M., who had a 9.8. It was the only sub-10 second time of the night. But Jones failed on his second steer and had to settle for $877.66. Not bad for less than 10 seconds.

 

Best in the second round was Leo Campbell of Amarillo, Texas, with a 10.5 who also got $877.66. Campbell also was unable to draw into the two-steer money, missing out on the first round with a no time.

 

Getting the best on two was Rocky Garnett of McAlester, who just incidentally finished the first go with a 12.0 at 6:30 p.m. and came right back as the first roper in the second go with an even better time of 11.0 for a combined 23.0 which also earned $877.66.

 

Next in the first round at 12.0 were Tim Dilbeck of Fairfax and Garrett and the two split the second-third money each getting $665.50 while Garrett had the second best in the second round for $742.89 and J. Paul Williams, born and raised in Ponca City, but now of Burbank, had 11.6 for $510.73 along with Chet Herrin, of Pawhuska.

 

Tee Woolman, a former national champion, had two steers in the time of 26.4 for $742.89. The Llano, Texas roper had 13.5 on the first go and 12.9 on the second, and did pocket $51.59 on a three-way tie for sixth money.

 

First round winners of money in the other three events held, with their second rounds throughout the three-night performances, included Bernie Boeser, of Pratt, Kan., a 4.6 time in the steer wrestling for $956.33; Ken Bailey, Henryetta, a 9.2 in tie-down roping for $927.51 and team ropers header Justin Turner of Vinita and heeler Coleman Proctor of Miami, 4.8 for $763.16 each.

 

Rodeo fans will have opportunities the next three nights to see a lot of rodeo, including all the activity that goes with it. One thing that rodeo fans will have to realize on Saturday morning for the parade in downtown Ponca City on Grand Avenue, that a detour on a federal highway through town will keep the parade east of the railroad tracks. That's unusual for parade watchers normally lining up on West Grand Avenue, so they will have to make different arrangements Saturday to see the parade. Complete parade information can be found on Page 6A.

Ride 'em Cowboys!
By BOB PATTERSON - News City Editor

The opening night of the 47th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo proved to be quite a show, with good times in the timed events, and relatively good scores in the riding events to an appreciative crowd at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena.

 

Tonight's second night should be just as interesting, as well as Saturday night, when cowboys and cowgirls attempt to nab some of the prize money from the 101 Rodeo Association and rodeo producer Dell Hall of the Rafter H Rodeo Producing Inc. out of Tahlequah.

 

The rodeo association, headed by Larry Goodno, has provided quite a show this year, with the return of One-Armed Bandit John Payne and his company of experts at wild animal training. The show gets off to a preliminary start with the singing of Lucas Ciliberti in the arena without accompaniment. The 6-year-old has been wowing crowds with his singing since he was 18 months old.

 

The 101 Wild West Drill Team provided a spectacular show of riding in the Grand Entry that also included six 101 Wild West Rodeo queen contestants, along with many other cowboys and cowgirls, for one of the better Grand Entries.

 

But the real show that rodeo fans were awaiting went rather smooth, with the start providing a really good ride from Caine Riddle of Vernon, Texas, in the bareback bronc riding, scoring a 73 on the Rafter H steed, Wild Rose. That came after Austin Griffith of Alvord, Texas, had a 67 on (My Friend) Flicka, as announced by rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips. Then, another rider, Ted Osman, of Fort Scott, Kan., got a 68 on Big Mack. Those scores may be tough to beat.

 

During the steer wrestling, it wasn't until the final bulldogger did rodeo fans really get a show. Jule Hazen of Protection, Kan., did the trick in 4.3 and that topped all of the previous efforts for the evening. The crowd could sense that great times could happen right away, when Ricky Riley of Checotah had a 7.2 and then got really topped by Jason Blubaugh of Clearwater, Kan., with a 4.6. That didn't hold up either, as the very next bulldogger Chancey Larson of Manhattan, Kan., had a 4.4 to go with a first round 14.9 to set the pace at 19.3 on two.

 

Three other steer wrestlers earned crowd delight, when Justin Thompson of North Platte, Neb., had 5.2 and Tyson Brenton, Rosalia, Kan., had 4.5. However, best on two went to the next-to-last performer, Shane Henderson of Winfield, Kan., who had a 5.0 to go with the slack performance on Wednesday of 4.8 and a 9.8. That most certainly will be hard to beat.

 

Saddle bronc riders had a tough go of it, with only two staying on long enough to score. But the scores were not expected to hold up, although anything can happen in rodeo. Winfield's Todd Leftwich had 72 on Flop and Sam Spreadborough of Snyder, Texas, got a 67 on Brown Sugar.

 

Cade Swor of Winnie, Texas, had the best time in tie-down roping. He got the job done on a Rafter H calf in 9.2, but had a no time in the slack on Wednesday so is out of the money on two. Russell Wells of Lindsay, Okla., has the best shot so far in tie-down with an 11.3 on Thursday to go with his 9.7 on slack, for a 21.0 total. However, unofficially, it didn't hold up when more slack was held in that event after the formal performances Thursday. Ken Bailey of Henryetta, Okla., had a 10.8 to go with his 9.2 earlier in the evening and has a 19.0 that should go a long way in deciding the issue. There are some other scores that could make it, but getting two under 10 seconds will be the test.

 

Speaking of slack, there were 18 tie-down ropers and nine steer wrestlers that put out their efforts after the regular Thursday performance. That plus a number of local team ropers attempting to get into Saturday's finals was witnessed by die-hard rodeo fans that went after midnight.

 

Team roping in the regular Thursday performance saw some really good efforts, including the leaders when Luke Blanton of Lamont and Tyler Garten of Kingman, Kan., had 4.3. That's the best for second go, but they had a no time in slack on Wednesday.

 

Two other teams had 6.0. They were Mitch Murray of Alma, Kan., and Jack Scott of Council Grove, Kan., and the team of Caleb Woodard, Zenda, Kan. and Dusty Arnold, Hutchinson, Kan. However, Murray-Scott had no time on Wednesday slack, while Woodard-Arnold had a 20.0 to go with the 6.0 Thursday to finish with 26.0 on two. That may or may not finish in the money, as others get their chances tonight and Saturday. It isn't even close to the lead that was provided by the first two ropers on Thursday, Tim Vistory of Chelsea, Okla., and Ben Hogan, Muldrow, Okla., who had a 7.0 to go with Wednesday's 6.0 for a 13.0 on two.

 

Local team ropers had a tough time of it, but three did get times on the board and look forward to being in the finals on Saturday. Top eight, including Thursday's slack, and tonight's eight, get to the finals. Locals nabbing spots included the best effort of Jay Goff and Brian Eddings at 9.6, Tom Nichols and David Belair, 12.1 and Kelly Divine and Danny Nichols at 12.3. Slack times were unavailable.

 

Heading to the final Thursday performance of bull riding, the crowd got some good looks at girl barrel racers, with one providing the best time so far. Wednesday, prior to all the cowboy slack, there were 15 or so girl barrel racers and the best time then was a 17.35. However, Tracy Nowlin of Nowata had a 17.30 to take the lead. Right behind the Wednesday leader of June Holeman, Arcadia, Neb., also came Brooke Catalani of San Antonio, with 17.43 and Gretchen Hilton of Stillwater with 17.59.

 

In the bull riding, Mena, Ark., rider Clint Craig had an 80 on Lane's Pet while Grandon Wesson of Delaware, Okla., had 77 on JO. Third at the present time is Dusty Ast of Garden Plain, Kan., with a 73 on 303. Six others failed to ride their competitor.

 

Parade Saturday

 

Don't forget rodeo fans, or better yet, parade watchers. The parade route along Grand Avenue has been shortened from First Street to Fifth Street, as a result of the detour on U.S. 60 Business. That means that folks normally getting first views from First Street west to former lineup areas along West Grand Avenue, will have to take spots along either South First Street where the parade participants will be lining up or along East Grand Avenue, from First to Fifth.

 

It starts at 10 a.m. and activities for Kid's Rodeo will be held at the Ponca City Library following the parade.

 

Tonight's performance begins at 8 p.m. as does Saturday's. However on Saturday, the coronation of the 2006 101 Wild West Rodeo queen will be held shortly after the Grand Entry.

Rodeo Action

JOHN PAYNE, the One-Armed Bandit, performs his act Thursday at the 101 Wild West Rodeo with a bison making a charge. (News Photo by Rolf Clements)

Wild West Rodeo Starts With Parade of Flags

OPENING PAGEANTRY at the 101 Wild West Rodeo on Thursday featured a parade in of flags on horseback led by Old Glory. (News Photo by Rolf Clements)

Leading Royals

BRANDI LINDE, the 101 Rodeo Queen crowned at the 2005 rodeo, smiles as she leads other mounted royalty down Grand Avenue during Saturday's rodeo parade. (News Photo by Rolf Clements)

101 Wild West Rodeo Final Results

Girls Barrel Racing

1. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 17.21, $1,065.45.

2. Tracy Nowlin, Nowata, 17.30, $913.24.

3. June Holeman, Arcadia, Neb., 17.35, $761.04.

4. Randus London, Freedom, 17.38, $659.56.

5. Rhonda Straw, Miami, Okla., 17.42, $507.36.

6. Brooke Catalini, San Antonio, Texas, 17.43, $405.88.

7. Nanci Pratt, Scott City, Kan., 17.44, $304.41.

8. Delores Toole, Manter, Kan., 17.49, $202.94.

9. Alicia Ary, Preston, Kan., 17.50, $152.20.

10. (tie) Gretchen Hilton, Stillwater, and Cindy Rijfkogel, Garden City, Kan., 17.59, $50.73 each.

Bareback Riding

1. Steve Thornburn, Eaton Rapids, Mich., 79, 1,034.55.

2. Caine Riddle, Verrnon, Texas, 73, $783.75.

3. (tie) Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, and Levi Dolch, Atlanta, Iowa, and Brian Leddy, Leedey, Okla., 72, $386.65 each.

6. Ted Osman, Fort Scott, Kan., 68, $156.75.

Steer Wrestling

(First Go-Round)

1. Bernie Boeser, Pratt, Kan., 4.6, $956.33.

2. Dale Yerigan, Pryor, 4.7, $717.24.

3. Shane Henderson, Winfield, Kan., 4.8, $478.16.

4. Stan Williams, Okmulgee, 5.0, $239.08.

(Second Go-Round)

1. Jule Hazen, Protection, Kan., 4.3, $956.33.

2. Chancey Larson, Manhattan, Kan., 4.4, $717.24.

3. Tyson Brenton, Rosalia, Kan., 4.5, $478.16.

4. Jason Blubaugh, Clearwater, Kan., 4.6, $239.08.

(Average)

1. Tyson Brenton, Rosalia, Kan., 9.6, $956.33.

2. Shane Henderson, Winfield, Kan., 9.8, $717.24.

3. Dale Yerigan, Pryor, 10.1, $478.16.

4. Blake Mindemann, Apache, Okla., 11.7, $239.08.

Saddlebronc Riding

1. Charles Soileau, Bluff Dale, Texas, 80, $1,081.57.

2. Bobby Griswold, Geary, Okla., 78, $819.37.

3. Weston Ireland, Sallisaw, 77, $589.95.

4. Will Payne, Beaver, Okla., 74, $393.30.

5. (tie) Todd Leftwich, Winfield, Kan., and Ty Atchison, Jackson, Mo., 72, $196.64 each.

Tie-Down Roping

(First Go-Round)

1. Ken Bailey, Henryetta, Okla., 9.2, $927.51.

2. Russell Wells, Lindsay, Okla., 9.7, $767.59.

3. Tyler Garten, Kingman, Kan., 9.9, $607.68.

4. Caddo Lewallen, Morrison, 10.8, $447.76.

5. Brian Bendele, Chandler, 11.0, $287.84.

6. Blair Burk, Durant, 11.1, $159.91.

(Second Go-Round)

1. Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, 9.1, $927.51.

2. Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas, 9.2, $767.59.

3. Brent Dorsey, Binger, 9.6, $607.68.

4. Bill Huber, Albin, Iowa, 9.8, $47.76.

5. Barry Burk, Ponca City, 10.2, $287.84.

6. (tie) Brady Brock, Justin, Texas, and Marty Jones, Hobbs, N.M., and Bill Sharber, Konawa, 10.3, $53.30 each.

(Average)

1. Ken Bailey, Henryetta, Okla., 20.0, $927.51.

2. Russell Wells, Lindsay, Okla., 21.0, $767.59.

3. Brady Brock, Justin, Texas, 22.4, $607.68.

4. Bill Huber, Albin, Iowa, 22.9, $447.76.

5. Colt Miller, Apache, Okla., 24.9, $287.84.

6. Dustin Raupe, Douglass, Kan., 27.5, $159.91.

Team Roping

(First Go-Round)

1. Justin Turner, Vinita-Coleman Proctor, Miami, Okla., 4.8, $763.16 each.

2. Jess Tierney, Laverne, Okla.,-J.W. Nelson, Durant, 5.0, $572.37 each.

3. Josh Hamilton-Bill Hamilton, Beggs, 5.1, $381.58 each.

4. Colt Braden, Dewey-Jake Long, Alva, 5.2, $190.79 each.

(Second Go-Round)

1. Luke Blanton, Lamont-Tyler Garten, Kingman, Kan., 4.3, $763.16 each.

2. Steve Purcella, Hereford, Texas=Britt Bochius, Claremore, 4.5, $572.37 each.

3. Justin Turner, Vinita-Coleman Proctor, Miami, Okla., 5.2, $381.58 each.

4. Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla.,-Stitches Stanley, Rose, Okla., 5.3, $190.79 each.

(Average)

1. Justin Turner, Vinita-Coleman Proctor, Miami, Okla., 10.0, $763.16 each.

2. Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla.,-Stitches Stanley, Rose, Okla., 11.1, $572.37 each.

3. Rocky Dunchan, Garvin, Okla.,-Wayne Carter, Calera, Okla., 11.5, $381.58 each.

4. Cody McMinn, Caddo Mills, Texas-Tripp Johnson, Bokchito, Okla., 12.0, $190.79 each.

Bull Riding

1. Justin Koon, Grapevine, Ark., 83, $1,222.65.

2. Clint Craig, Mena, Ark., 80, $926.25.

3. Brandon Wesson, Delaware, Okla., 77, $666.90.

4. Lonnie Carpenter, Haysville, Kan., 75, $444.60.

5. (tie) Nathan Klassen, Broken Arrow and Luke Gray, Eagle, Colo., 74, $222.30 each.

Steer Wrestling

(Held Wednesday)

(First Go-Round)

1. Marty Jones, Hobbs, N.M., 9.8, $897.66.

2. (tie) Tim Dilbeck, Fairfax, and Rocky Garnett, McAlester, 12.0, $665.50 each.

4. Don Hall, Mustang, 12.2, $433.35.

5. Joey Bills, Pawhuska, 12.5, $278.58.

6. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, 12.7, $154.77.

(Second Go-Round)

1. Leo Campbell, Amarillo, Texas, 10.5, $897.66.

2. Rocky Garnett, McAlester, 11.0, $742.89.

3. (tie) J. Paul Williams, Burbank, and Chet Herren, Pawhuska, 11.6, $510.73 each.

5. Grady Potter, Arkansas City, Kan., 12.8, $278.58.

6. (tie) J.R. Magdeburg, Cushing and Cody Scheck, Buffalo and Tee Woolman, Llano, Texas, 12.9, $51.59 each.

(Average)

1. Rocky Garnett, Mcalester, 23.0, $897.66.

2. Tee Woolman, Llano, Texas, 26.4, $742.89.

3. Grady Potter, Arkansas City, Kan., 26.5, $588.12.

4. Tim Dilbeck, Fairfax, 28.3, $433.35.

5. Neal Wood, Guy, Texas, 28.4, $278.58.

6. J. Paul Williams, Burbank, 28.9, $154.77.


Rodeo Winners

LOCAL TEAM ROPING winners at the 101 Wild West Rodeo are Dr. Jeff Blanton, left, and Terry Moore, right, seen being awarded prize saddles by Guy Monroe, chairman of the Kaw Nation, center. The competition was sponsored by the Kaw Southwind Casino. (News Photo by Rolf Clements)

Exciting Night of Rodeo Wraps Up Annual Event
By BOB PATTERSON - News City Editor

A cool breeze from the northeast may have been just the thing for rodeo enthusiasts Saturday. At least there was a good crowd at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena for the final night of three performances of the 101 Wild West Rodeo (four if you happened to be die-hard and watch slack on Wednesday)!

 

Rodeo fans received a treat when they watched some really great performances on Saturday, and the crowd was the biggest of the three nights of regular performance. While it wasn't capacity, it was a good crowd and pleased the 101 Ranch Rodeo Association.

 

In the first official event, bareback bronc riding, proved to be exciting. It included a second place ride in the event by Levi Dolch of Atlanta, Iowa, with a 73 on Nightlight. That event Saturday also found Brian Leddy of Leedey, getting a 72 on Mabeline. That was good enough for a three-way tie for third money in the three nights. Best for the three nights was a 79 by Steve Thornburn of Eaton Rapids, Mich.

 

The crowd was also treated to some really good efforts from local ranch bronc riding contestants in an event sponsored by Paradise Casino. Saturday Matt Peak had a 75 and Brian Peak had a 73 while Chris Potter recorded a 67.

 

Queen contests were next in the arena, for the annual coronation ceremonies. Kallie Sue Baker, 16-year-old daughter of Ronnie and Karen Baker of Mustang, who had taken the announced horsemanship award, was crowned 2006 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen.

 

In steer wrestling, best time on Saturday was a 5.4 by Dale Yerigan of Pryor. While that didn't get him in the money for the second go-round, it did give him a combined 10.1 on two with his 4.7 in slack earlier, for third in the average.

 

Two other steer wrestlers were fortunate to get the best of the animal, with Jeremy Zehr of Augusta, Kan., getting a 9.0 and Mark Nett, Udall, Kan., with a 9.7. But neither finished in the money for second go or average from the 32 entrants.

 

In saddle bronc riding, Bobby Griswold of Geary, Okla., had a 78 on Oil Stuart Little from the Rafter H Rodeo Producing rough stock. That earned him second money behind Charles Soileau of Bluff Dale, Texas, who had an 80 earlier.

 

An arena-filled bunch of youngsters did their best in the calf scramble. The numbers of youngsters in the three nights of calf scramble must have been in the 200-300 figures (maybe more, who was counting?)

 

Second go-round tie-down ropers had a tough night. Jerome Schneeberger of Ponca City remained on top of the go-round with his 9.1 on Thursday slack after the Thursday regular performance. Best for the tie-down ropers on Saturday was a 10.3 by Bill Sharber of Konawa. However, Sharber had a 20.7 in slack so out of the money. Finishing in the money on two as a result of consistency, was Colt Miller of Apache, who had a 12.7 to go with an earlier 12.2 and 24.9 on two. That was good for fifth in average.

 

During the team roping, two teams who had good times in second go to go along with slack times finished in the money for average. They didn't get into the money for the round. Rocky Duncan of Garvin and Wayne Carter of Calera had a 5.5 to go with their 6.0 for 11.5 and finished third on two while Cody McMinn of Caddo Mills, Texas and partner Tripp Johnson of Bokchito, Okla., had 6.6 to go with a 5.4 for fourth on two at 12.0.

 

One of the really exciting times for local rodeo enthusiasts came in the local team roping, sponsored by Kaw Southwind Casino. Eight final teams for Saturday had participated in slack and Thursday and Friday in a draw that saw one of the largest fields for the local team roping. Winners for the night, who received new saddles from Kaw Southwind, were Terry Moore-Dr. Jeff Blanton, who had an 8.6 to go with 10.4 which had been fourth place earlier and a 19.0 on two. Top three teams earlier were unable to do the trick Saturday. Second went to Tom Nichols-David Belair, who had a 9.1 to go with a 12.1, for 21.2.

 

The crowd also got a treat from girls barrel racing, when third to the last gal had a 17.21. That was Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., and she got the top prize for the week, besting what had been tops for a couple of nights at 17.30 by Tracy Nowlin of Nowata.

Only two contestants were able to claim scores on bull riding, out of the seven that attempted it Saturday. Lonnie Carpenter of Haysville, Kan., had a 75 on Big Sandy while Nathan Klassen of Broken Arrow had 74 on Blue Smoke II to get fourth and a tie for fifth in the money, respectively.

 

One Arm Bandit and Company John Payne completed his three nights with a sterling performance just prior to the bull riding.

Clowning Around

THE RODEO CLOWN for this year's 101 Wild West Rodeo was Ponca City's own Jay Stout, seen here in super-hero mode during the bullriding event. (News Photo by Rolf Clements)

Mustang Teen Named Rodeo Queen

Kallie Sue Baker of Mustang was honored Saturday night as the winner of the Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contest. Six contestants vied for the title.

 

Leah Beth Fischer of Ponca City was selected as first runner-up and earned both the Speech Award and the Ticket Sales Award.

 

Baker is the 16-year-old daughter of Ronnie and Karen Baker of Mustang. In her spare time she enjoys team sorting with her dad and sister, barrel racing, pole bending, and riding with the Freedom Riders 4-H Drill Team.

 

She is an active member of the Heart of Oklahoma Youth' Rodeo Association and the American Barrel Racers Association.

 

Baker will represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo at the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Pageant in August 2007.

 

In addition to winning the title of queen, Baker earned the Horsemanship Award.

Kelsey Cox of Talala was chosen by the other contestants for the Miss Congeniality Award.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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