2010

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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WATCH HERE FOR A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2010

 
 

RODEO DATES: 12th, 13th, & 14th

 
ANNOUNCER: Dr. Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Dr. Lynn Phillips
RODEO QUEEN: Lauren Hadley SPECIALTY ACT: John Harrison
RODEO PRINCESS: Jada Haken STOCK CONTRACTOR: Andrew's Rodeo Co.

101 Wild West Rodeo Begins Thursday

By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

It’s time to get out that cowboy hat once again and don the sharp pointed boots and take in one of the premiere events of Ponca City, the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

That’s right, for dates of this year’s 101 Wild West Rodeo are upon us and start with the three-day event Thursday, Aug. 12, running through the 14th. Each night, the main performances begin at 8 p.m.

This is the 51st since the return of rodeo to the Ponca City scene, and will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena. It is in the same arena that has been wowing crowds since 1960, located on West Prospect Avenue off of North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

The 2010 Rodeo will mark the 51st running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends - the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a “round-up” or “buffalo chase” as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix’s debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the “101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show” things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960.

By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers were constructed in 1962; however additional improvement in chute heaven, the press box, and the new left and right release chutes have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Larry Goodno, in his tenth year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the three-night stand. Other foundation officers include Raymond Ball as vice president; Darleanna Wamecke as secretary and Shawndra Sheik as treasurer.

Are you tough enough to wear pink? The 101 Wild West Rodeo will continue the tradition with the implementation of a Tough Enough To Wear Pink? Night. Thursday evening’s performance will be designated as “Pink Night”. The color pink is not something you would usually associate with the tough sport of rodeo; however, breast cancer has touched the lives of many rodeo and western lifestyle families. Rodeo committees, western event producers and western manufacturers have joined together to raise awareness and funds for the fight against breast cancer.

The TETWP campaign puts this important health issue top-of-mind at rodeos and western events across America and Canada. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation which organizes and puts on the 101 Wild West Rodeo is pleased to join those who have already gotten behind this campaign and the momentum continues to build.

At Thursday’s performance, the foundation will give $1 for each person in the audience who is wearing pink and $50 for each event winner who is wearing pink to the Breast Cancer Assistance Program Fund out of Tulsa.

Thursday will also be Community Appreciation night come out early and enjoy a free barbecue dinner with ticket purchase from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the east-side of the rodeo grounds.

On Friday and Saturday there will be a live concert and dance immediately following each night’s Rodeo performance on the east-side of the arena. Meet the cowboys and contract personnel, visit with some old friends or maybe make some new ones.

Back again to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women’s Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. This year’s rodeo is again being produced by Andrew’s Rodeo Company of Addielou, Texas, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Andrew’s Rodeo Company has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a three-night plus slack rodeo.

Andrew’s ability to produce quality stock is well noted with 1999 Hall of Fame Bucking Bull, BODACIOUS, with 135 outs and only 8 qualified rides. Bodacious won Bucking Bull of the Year 1994, 1995, and Bucking Bull of the NFR 1992, 1994, and 1995. Son of Bodacious, Bo Dipping, began taking the spotlight in the Rodeo Circuit. He was awarded Rankest Bull Summer Finals in Dallas 2001 and 2002. Sports Illustrated followed his career with an article in June 2003. Fort Worth Star Telegram and Dallas Morning News visited the Andrews Ranch summer 2003 publishing a full-page article on Sammy and BoDipping. In 2004, Outdoor Life visited the Andrews Ranch and aired a documentary called FEARLESS BODACIOUS. Houston Rodeo and Livestock Show honored Sammy during the year 2004 awarding him with a bucking chute to use as a memorial for Bo’s grave. ESPN has recently visited the Andrews Ranch and aired an insert of Sammy and Bodacious throughout the telecast of the 2005 NFR displaying the muchappreciated bucking chute.

Serving as Barrelman and this year’s specialty act will be John Harrison from Soper, Okla., where he lives with his wife, Carla and daughter Addison. He has a degree in Agriculture-business and is a certified Equine Massage Therapist.

John was six when he received his first trick riding lesson after watching a trick rider perform at a nearby rodeo. Since then he has trained and performed with many of the best trick riders in the world.

John became a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) in 1999, as a trick and roman rider, and trick roper. He has since diversified and added barrelman to his PRCA card.

Today John entertains with his walk & talk comedy that is backed by his quick wit, and with his two strongest acts; Miss Rodeo Universe and Comedy Trick Riding.

John has been selected to perform three times at the prestigious Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nev. Four times he has been nominated for Comedy Act of the Year.

Returning this year as Bullfighters will be Wacey Munsell and Jeremy Muntz.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance.

Reigning queen, Kelly Bergin of Oklahoma City, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have many opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance. Reigning princess, Madison LeAnn Smith will be handing over her title and crowning the new 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess.

“Rodeo Week” in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the east end of Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock. Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year’s rodeo. “Family Night” is Thursday with adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, and kids ages 12 & under FREE. Friday and Saturday performances are adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, kids ages 7-12 $5, & kids ages 6 and under FREE, or buy a weekend pass and enjoy all 3 nights for $20. Advanced tickets can be found at select local businesses.

Andrews Rodeo Company Shows Why It’s Here Again for the ‘101’

Sammy Andrews was introduced to rodeo at a young age. He is the son of B.D. Andrews who was a PRCA Stock Contractor in the forties and fifties. Sammy started producing amateur rodeos in 1980 and received his PRCA Card in 1987. James Andrews, son of Sammy Andrews, is a third generation of Rodeo and shares the responsibilities of producing outstanding Rodeos and award winning Breeding Program at the Andrews Ranch.

Andrews was nominated as Stock Contractor of the Year 2000, 2002, and 2004 by PRCA members. Sammy was selected as Stock Contractor of the Year 2002. Stock recognized by PRCA such as 1990 Runner-up Bull of the Year and 1991 Bucking Bull of the Year, Skoal’s Outlaw Willie. Skat Kat was Bucking Bull of the NFR 1996, 1998, and Runnerup Bull of the Year in 1999. In 2000 Omalene was the Runnerup NFR Bareback Horse, 2001 Roly Poly was Runner-up Horse of the Year and Bareback Horse of the NFR finals, and in 2004 he was Bareback Horse of the National Finals. In the Year 2003, Omaha Tour Finals, Big Time was selected Bull of the Finals; at the 2003 Dallas Tour Finals, Wild Weed was selected as Bull of the Finals. And a new young bull Cat Daddy was selected as Bull of the Finals at the 2004 Winter Finals in Las Vegas. At the 2004 Texas Circuit Finals, Roly Poly was selected as Bareback Horse of the Year and Erksme was selected as Bull of the Year. 2005 San Antonio began recognizing top ranked stock performance during the San Antonio Rodeo. Andrews bull Cat Daddy walked away with the check and recognition for the bull of the event and in 2006 Fender Bender received the honor, Thanks to San Antonio. Cat Daddy was voted Runner-Up Bull of the Year 2005. Texas Circuit Finals for 2005, Roly Polly 2nd bare back horse, Broncs Faded Star 3rd, in the Bulls Cat Daddy received Bull of the year with Rompus and Erksme tying for 2nd and 3rd. Year 2006 Fender Bender received the honor of runner up PRCA BULL of the Year, Texas Circuit Finals Bull of The Year.
Rompus was 2nd Bull of the year Texas Circuit Finals.

Andrew’s ability to produce quality stock is well noted with 1999 Hall of Fame Bucking Bull, BODACIOUS, with 135 outs and only 8 qualified rides. Bodacious won Bucking Bull of the Year 1994, 1995, and Bucking Bull of the NFR 1992, 1994, and 1995. Son of Bodacious, Bo Dipping, began taking the spotlight in the Rodeo Circuit. He was awarded Rankest Bull Summer Finals in Dallas 2001 and 2002. Sports Illustrated followed his career with an article in June 2003. Ft. Worth Star Telegram and Dallas Morning News visited the Andrews Ranch summer 2003 publishing a full-page article on Sammy and Bo Dipping. In 2004, Outdoor Life visited the Andrews Ranch and aired a documentary called FEARLESS BODACIOUS. Houston Rodeo and Livestock Show honored Sammy during the year 2004 awarding him with a bucking chute to use as a memorial for Bo’s grave. ESPN has recently visited the Andrews Ranch and aired an insert of Sammy and Bodacious through out the telecast of the 2005 NFR displaying the much-appreciated bucking chute.

The greatest pride came when the fourth generation of the Andrews Rodeo Co. Summer Andrews at the young age of five, displayed the Texas Flag during the Saturday night performance of the 2004 Texas Stampede in Dallas, Texas. Summer and Savana Waller often display the American Flag, riding their ponies during the National Anthem. Everyone loves a youngster on a pony.

Andrews Rodeo Co. takes pride in producing bucking bulls from rodeo legends. These include many of the rankest bucking bulls in rodeo history, such as: BODACIOUS, Skat Kat, Tumble Weed, Wild Toad, Super Dave, and Erkel. The sons of these legends that are now being produced by Andrews Rodeo Co. are Bo’s Excuse, Fender Bender, Erksme, Wild Weed, Little Weed, Jim Dipping, Rena’s Pet,
Red Onion, and Rocking Synde.

The knowledge gained from a lifetime of Rodeo experience, including founding and operating Andrews Rodeo Co., has given Andrews the opportunity to represent the Stock Contractors on the ExecutiveCouncil of the PRCA for the past eight years. Andrews Ranch is located in Addielou, Texas where Sammy and his wife Rena make their home. Sammy and his son James along with his family, wife Pepper and their children Summer, Kelon, and Alley continue producing outstanding rodeos with stock from their award winning breeding program.
 

Dazzling Shriners Here for Parade Clowns, colorful floats and little cars will roar through town on Saturday, Aug. 14, as part of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade.

The theme of this year’s Shriners float is “Shriners and Shriners Hospitals for Children ... Helping Kids Defy the Odds.” It will be accompanied by members of Akdar Shrine, Tulsa’s local chapter of Shriners International, wearing their trademark little red hats, called a “fez.” Akdar Shriners participate in more than 56 parades each year to entertain the communities and promote fundraising initiatives for Shriners Hospitals for Children. Because the entire cost of operating these facilities is borne entirely by contributions from Shriners of North America and the general public, fundraising efforts are critical.

Shriners Hospitals for Children were founded in 1922 by the fraternity now known as Shriners International, which continues to support these hospitals as its philanthropy, to provide pediatric specialty care — with no financial obligation to patients or their families — Shriners Hospitals for Children are currently providing treatment to more than 1,300 children from northern Oklahoma. Funds raised by
Akdar Shriners help support this effort.

Shriners Hospitals for Children began as one hospital located in Shreveport, La. Today, Shriners Hospitals for Children is one-of-a-kind international health care system dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing pediatric specialty care, innovative research and outstanding teaching programs.

Children up to the age of 18 with orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries, cleft lip and palate are eligible for care and receive all services in a family-centered environment with no financial obligation to the patients or families.

For more information about contributing to Shriners Hospital for Children or if you know of a child Shriners might be able to help, as a Shriner, or call 918-836-2528, or visit www.akdarshrine.org  www.shrinershospitals.org  or www.donate.2SHC.org

Bullfighters Wacey Munsell and Jeremy Muntz Show Off While Saving Bull Riders Lives

Wacey Munsell — 2004 & 2006 World Champion Freestyle Bullfighter 2005 & 2006 PBR Dickies National Champion.

It seems almost natural that Wacey Munsell become a bullfighter, as he is a 3rd generation bullfighter following in the steps of his granddad, father and uncle. Wacey has honed his bullfighting skills almost from the time he could walk using practically anything that he could make an imaginary bull out of; the dogs, a ram, a goat, and swing sets. Those imaginary bulls have now become the real thing.

At 22 years old he already has 9 years of experience fighting bulls at rodeos across the Midwest. In 2004 Wacey was the youngest ever to be allowed on the Two Bulls Professional Bullfighters tour and the World Championship Rodeo Bullfighting tour. Not only did he join the tour he ended up the 2004 World Champion! In October 2004 he won the finals of the world championship rodeo bullfights tour and the gold buckle just 8 days after his 18th birthday, and struck gold again in October 2006 claiming his second World Championship!

In late 2004 Wacey was approved for his PRCA bullfighter’s card and in December of 2004 he won the PRCA’s Benny Binion NFR Bucking Stock Sale bullfighting championship. His goal is to someday work the NFR and PBR finals. Twice he has been nominated to fight the Kansas High School Rodeo Finals (2004-2005), and was crowned the 2005 and 2006 California Rodeo Salinas freestyle bullfighting champion in Salinas, California. Wacey is a quality cowboy protector during the bullriding and one that bullriders trust to keep them safe, but he is a world champion freestyle bullfighter so don’t take your eyes off of him after a bullrider leaves the arena, because this is when his fun begins and he will leave you on the edge of your seat with crowd thrilling, heart stopping freestyle bullfighting. Get caught up in the action with Wacey Munsell, the new young gun in town and smoking hot!

Wacey Munsell is attending Dodge City Community College in Dodge City, KS with interests in Artificial Insemination, Embryo Transfer and Ag business management.

Jeremy Muntz — here for his second visit to the Ponca City rodeo scene has a passion for the sport of rodeo. He provides one major function, and that is cowboy protection. It is his job to keep the Bullrider out of harm’s way in the rodeo arena and put his life on the line for a fallen cowboy.

Jeremy is 28 years old and is from Denton, NE, he has been a PRCA Bullfighter for 2 years.

Jeremy is very familiar with the rodeo industry and has a dedication to the sport and cowboy way of life. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability and cowboy protection in the rodeo arena and professionalism and hard work wherever he may go.

Three Vie for 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen
There are three candidates vying for the honor of becoming the 2011 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen. They include Lauren Hadley, of Ponca City; Rebecca Jo Nester, also of Ponca City; and Kandis Rupp, of Marshall, Okla.
Introducing.....Lauren Hadley

Lauren Hadley is the 21-yearold daughter of Paul and Terri Hadley and the granddaughter of the late Dr. L.L. Merrifield and Jan Merrifield Fiedler, all of Ponca City.

Born and raised on her family’s ranch outside of Ponca City, she graduated Ponca City High School in 2007. While in high school, she was a member of National Honor Society and active in the Ponca City chapter of Future Farmers of America. During her senior year she served the chapter as secretary.

In 2009, Hadley graduated from Northern Oklahoma College in Tonkawa with an associate degree in agricultural science. While attending NOC, she was a member of the NOC Aggie Club and Phi Theta Kappa as well as selected to the Dean’s Honor Roll each semester. She is currently a senior at Oklahoma State University pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science with a focus on animal production.

As a student at OSU she carries the responsibility of Horse Manager of the Oklahoma State Polo Club — a demanding position that requires oversight of farrier services, vaccinations, teeth floating, conditioning, training and ensuring the horses travel safely and comfortably across the nation to polo matches. Hadley is a member of the polo team.

She has been a horsewoman since the age of four. Though she started out riding western round the ranch, when she was seven she fell in love with English riding, specifically dressage and jumping. Throughout the years, Hadley has won many regional dressage titles and competed in the national Dressage Seat Medal Finals four times, placing in the top four nationally each time. She was also the Region 9 team alternate for the International North American Young Rider Team in 2008. After many years of hard work and success in dressage and jumping, Hadley is honoring her ranching heritage by returning to her western roots. Hadley says that it would be a great honor for her to represent the rich heritage of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, as well as the ranching and rodeo heritage of her hometown, as the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen.
Introducing.....Rebecca Jo Nester

Rebecca Jo Nester is a 15 year old daughter of Joe Nester and Teri Nester of Ponca City. Rebecca will be entering the 10th grade at the Ponca City Senior High where she is active in FFA. Rebecca enjoys showing, barrel racing, and trail riding with her two gelding Bo and Ace. Bo is her seven year old palomino AQHA and Ace is her five year old tri-colored tobiono pinto. When Rebecca isn’t helping her mom or riding, she enjoys hanging out with friends, reading, or going to the lake with her family.
Introducing.....Kandis Rupp

Kandis Rupp is the 16-yearold daughter of Kory and Marnita Rupp, of Marshall Okla. Kandis is a sophomore at Covington-Douglas High School. She is a member of student council, FFA, 4-H, Fellowship of Christian Athlete’s, and class President.

Kandis is active in softball. Kandis’s goals are to win Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen and Miss Rodeo Oklahoma. After graduating high school she plans to pursue a degree in Veterinary Science to become an Equine Vet.

As a proud Oklahoma cowgirl she is a third generation horseman, Kandis began riding as soon as she was born. She was a mere 7 months old sitting in the saddle with her mom when she rode in the Cherokee Strip Parade in Perry for the first time and has rode for 16 years. She has grown up riding and competing in horseshow, queen contests, play days and rodeos.

This is what gave her passionate appreciation and love for the greatest animal on earth-HORSES!!

Kandis’s hobbies include pleasure riding, trail riding, play days, rodeos, softball, waterskiing, knee boarding, dancing, reading, drawing, singing, writing stories, and competitive archery.

Total of Five Contestants Seek Princess Title
In the second year for a Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess, there are five contestants.
Introducing.....Jori Claire Cowley

Jori Claire Cowley is a 10 year old rodeo cowgirl from Vinita. She is the daughter of Alan and Chandy Cowley and sister of Autry Cowley. She hails from a rodeo family with deep roots in the Professional
Rodeo Cowboys Association and the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Jori’s late grandfather Carl Thomas, was a Turtle member and her parents are retired PRCA Contract Act members. Her grandparents owned a western store in Vinita in the 40’s - 60’s and sold western clothes and tack during the 101 Rodeo in the first rodeos held: in the early 60’s, her grandfather roped at the first rodeos and her mom ran barrels in the late 70’s at the 101.

Jori won her first trophy buckle when she was only 3 years old. She is a member of Craig County Youth Rodeo Association and Central Timed Event Circuit. She competes in barrel racing, pole bending, flag racing, goat tying, and dummy roping. She continues to win buckles and rodeo awards.

Jori will be a 5th grader at Will Rogers Elementary in Vinita. She is a straight A student, STAR reader, in the Gifted and Talented Student program, and Academic Excellence Student.

Jori is a member of Helping Hands 4-H Club and Cherokee Nation Youth Choir. She loves to volunteer with senior citizens every week. She enjoys showing show steers, reading, spending time with her Nanny and Granny and her family and her corgi.

Jori wants to be a surgeon and Miss Rodeo America one day. Jori is very proud of her family’s tradition and heritage with the PRCA and the 101 Wild West Rodeo.
Introducing.....Jada Brooke Haken

Jada Brooke Haken is proud to be from Pawnee and is the daughter of Brett and Jana Haken. She is a fourth grader at Pawnee Elementary School and has always been on the Superintendant’s Honor Roll. She plays basketball and is a member of the 4-H club.

Jada enjoys barrel racing, pole bending, goat tying, horse shows, swimming, basketball, playing the piano and having fun.

She was born with a deep love and respect for horses. She started riding before she could walk and began competing at horse shows by the age of five and started competing at Junior Rodeos at the age of six.

Some of her accomplishments are:
2010 Oklahoma State 4-H Horse Show Barrel Racing Champion, 2009 COJRA Reserve All-around Cowgirl, 2008 Amanda Westermier Memorial Rodeo Allaround Cowgirl, 2008 COJRA third place All-around Cowgirl, and has won many ribbons, trophies and monies from rodeos, barrel races, horse shows and playdays.

One day Jada dreams of being Miss Rodeo USA, barrel racing at the Cheyenne Frontier Days and winning the NFR in barrel racing.
Introducing.....Harligh Cheyenne Moore

Harligh Cheyenne Moore is the 12-year-old daughter of Joyce Moore and Terry and Gidget Moore of Burbank.

She is a seventh grader at Woodland Middle School in Fairfax. She enjoys competing in Junior Rodeos and participates in barrels, poles, goat tying and breakaway roping. She recently won the 2010
Jr. Breakaway Roping at the Cavalcade in Pawhuska and placed fourth in the average in barrels. She also enjoys helping various ranchers in Osage County with spring calf working and shipping of yearlings.

She is involved in 4-H and enjoys showing horses, goats, and pigs She has won numerous trophies including Res. Grand Champion Doe Goat and Showmanship this past spring. She was also High Point Jr. in the Judging Contest. She is holding the title of Jr. Hall of Fame 4-H member and has been on the Superintendents honor roll for three years.

For fun she enjoys making crafts, attending youth at her church, swimming, playing the Wii and collecting various colors of duct tape to make things with.
Introducing.....Charity Rose Pulliam

Charity Rose Pulliam hails from Marland in the heart of the Fabulous Empire, 101 Ranch country. The 10-yearold cowgirl is the daughter of Kevan Pulliam and Yvonne Kelly Tarn.

She will be a fifth grade student at Frontier Public School where she is an honor student. Charity attends the United Methodist Christian Church in Marland.

Charity has just completed her first year as a member of the Frontier 4-H club. She has been their Song Leader and will the club’s Reporter this year. Her 3 main projects are Horse, Fashion & Fabric, and Food Science.

Charity is the 2009 Cherokee Strip Riding Club and Rodeo Princess and received the Miss Congeniality award for the Princess division at the 2011 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Scholarship Pageant.
Introducing.....Sierra Sidlo

Sierra Sidlo is the 10 yr. old daughter of Kristy Buck and Edward Sidlo. She has a little brother named Trent, “who I enjoy being around most of the time. I’m a 5th grader at Union Elementary in Ponca City.”

She is very glad to be going back to school to see friends. She is active in the local Western Wranglers 4-H club and showed in the N.W. District 4-H Horse Show and qualified in 5 of the classes. Then
she went on to the Oklahoma State 4-H Horse Show and placed 10th in my Horsemanship Class.

She was Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Sweetheart, ran for Newkirk Range Riders Sweetheart for two years, and ran for 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess last year. She had a lot of fun doing the rodeos, “I’ve made lots of friends and learned new things to help me out thru the years.

“I enjoy riding horses for fun and show. I’ve been helping my Mama work our 1yr old filly with the hopes that she will be my show horse. I enjoy spending my spare time playing with friends, swimming,
riding bikes with my brother, helping cook supper, and playing with our pets.”

2010 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma, Ponca City’s Chassity Sisco

Chassity Sisco, was crowned Miss Rodeo Oklahoma on July 22, 2009 during the 2010 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Scholarship pageant. The pageant was held in Oklahoma City in conjunction with the National Day of the American Cowboy. The pageant judging consisted of horsemanship, speech, modeling, interviewing, impromptu questions and written tests. As the titleholder of Miss Rodeo Oklahoma, Chassity will represent her state for the 2010 year by making appearances throughout Oklahoma and across the nation promoting the sport of rodeo and our western heritage. She will then travel to Las Vegas, Nevada in December of 2010 to vie for the prestigious title of Miss Rodeo America.

Hailing from Ponca City, Chassity is the 21-year-old daughter of Gary Sisco and Shawne Clapp. Graduating as Valedictorian, she was a member of the National Honor Society, Outstanding Students of America, Future Career and Community Leaders of America, and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Serving as a 4-H officer for many years, she was a two-time recipient of the Equine Grand Champion Top Hand Award. Chassity also received all-league honors, among many others, in varsity basketball, volleyball, softball and cheerleading.

She is currently a junior at Wichita State University pursuing a Masters degree in Finance and a minor in Marketing. While attending Wichita State she is a member of the Gamma Upsilon chapter of Delta Gamma, the American Quarter Horse Association, on the board for Women’s Pan-Hellenic Association, the Dean’s Honor Roll and National Society of Collegiate Scholars. Chassity believes in the importance of higher education and being a philanthropic to the world in which we live. She is involved in numerous community service organizations, for instance, Service for Sight and Give Kids the World.

Chassity’s involvement in rodeo started when she began riding horses before she could even walk. She joined many youth rodeo associations at a young age, competing in speed events and break away roping. After being a competitor of the sport of rodeo for many years, Chassity desired to become a rodeo queen and help educate others about the lifestyle she had grown to love. She entered her first rodeo queen pageant at age twelve, ever since that day, she had dreamt of being crowned Miss Rodeo Oklahoma. Chassity stated, “Success is not achieved alone, but in the hands and hearts of family
and friends.”

Chassity believes with hard work and God’s hands anything is possible. A favorite saying of hers is “A single smile can touch the hearts of many.” A motto in which she strives to live by is, “What you did yesterday was great, but what have you done today?”

Saying Good-Bye To Your 2009 Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen

Everyone who was a part of my reign, First of all, I would just like to say how truly grateful I am to have been Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo. The sport of rodeo is a beautiful tradition steeped in the camaraderie, grit, and fighting spirit that cowboys and cowgirls have put on display for hundreds of years. Rodeo is a true American tradition, and I am deeply honored to have been able to represent it this year. From the moment of my first rodeo with my equestrian drill team, I knew that the desire I felt to be a part of that world would never fade. Being a rodeo queen is a way to give back to a sport that continues to have a positive impact on my life, and I am so lucky to be given that opportunity.

However, there is something very special about being Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo. Something that I could not have found being the queen of any other rodeo, and that is the people of Ponca City and surrounding cities. While it’s true, I would have been happy with a different title, I never would have been able to have a year quite like this one. Even as I walked through the crowd during the rodeo with the other queen contestants last year, I knew there was just something different about them. From the warm smiles and waves we received to the mothers who pointed us out to their daughters and said “Look, there’s the rodeo queens, aren’t they pretty?” to the little boys who wanted to know if we had met the cowboys, the crowd made me feel right at home. At every appearance I have made this year, from parades to helping the 101 Ranch Old Timer’s Associate with a fundraiser, I was greeted with big smiles and kind words. I am so proud to represent such a wonderful place full of caring people, who have made me feel almost like a citizen myself. I would like to say a big thank you to the people of Ponca City, for making my reign truly great.

As Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo, I was able to represent not only a sport that is dear to me but also the rich history of the 101 Ranch. A true product of the hard work and values that our nation is built upon, the 101 was an amazing ranch and traveling show that provided job opportunities and family entertainment while preserving the western way of life. My ancestor, Robert Lincoln Barr, was one of the men who worked on the 101 ranch in its heyday, and so I feel especially honored to represent the rodeo that embodies its spirit. Even the 101 Wild West Rodeo itself has a vivid past, and it is a privilege to be crowned its 50th anniversary queen. Being crowned Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo allowed me to become a part of a glorious tradition, and that is an honor for which I will be forever grateful.

My year has been a wonderful adventure, full of joy, laughter, and immense pride. I have learned how to stand in the back of a moving truck while waving and smiling without clutching the rooftop for dear life, that Head Country BBQ really is the best, and that there isn’t a feeling in the world like signing an autograph for an adoring fan, or doing a queen run in front of a packed audience on a Saturday night. I have made memories that will stay with me forever, and been able to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo and all that it means to my fellow rodeo fans and myself. I will never be able to thank you all enough for this amazing opportunity and all of the great times that I have had as your rodeo queen. As my year draws to close, I wish for the next queen to enjoy her reign as much as I have, and to leave you all with the fond memories that I know I will look back upon.

Sincerely,
Kelly Bergin
Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo 2009

2009 Princess Says Good-Bye

This past year has gone by so fast. A year ago I competed with three other fabulous competitors who are also my friends. Being named the first ever Princess for the 101 Wild West Rodeo has been a thrill.

I will always be able to say I was the first.

I have traveled to several rodeos and functions here in the great state of Oklahoma representing my title and the greatest sport on dirt. From parades, state title holder coronations, my school, and
rodeos I can honestly say I have had a terrific year.

I’d like to take this time to wish this year’s competitors good luck.

I hope you have as much fun as I have had.

Groups To Perform National Anthem

Sweet Harmony Trio Thursday Night
Sweet Harmony is a musically versatile women’s trio based in Ponca City, Oklahoma.

Donita Cooper, Debbie Green, and Rhonda Walker have been sharing their sister like harmony through Christian music across the state of Oklahoma since 1996. They have also sung in Branson and in Kansas. Donita Cooper teaches private piano lessons. She and her husband Guy, a Minister of Music, have 3 children. They live in Ponca City. Debbie Green is a house detailer. Debbie’s husband, Mark, is a Conoco-Phillips employee and a member of the award winning gospel quartet Forgiven. They have 2 children in college and live in Owasso, Oklahoma. Rhonda Walker is a former computer programmer and currently a stay-at-home mother of four children. She and her husband, Michael, a pediatrician, live in Ponca City. All three ladies are members of the Singing Church Women of Oklahoma.

Dawn Jackson and Matthew Graves - Friday Night
Dawn Jackson was born and raised in Ponca City and currently lives here with her husband, Rodney, and their three children, Sarah (14), Olivia (10) and Trent (2).

Matthew Graves was born in Ponca City and has spent his whole 17 years here. He is a 3.8 grade point average Senior at Ponca City High School and is active in the Chorale and Orchestra.

Northwood boys Saturday Night
The Northwood Boys is a quartet:

Paul Briggs - medical doctor, practices in Blackwell, active in his church and sings in the praise team at Immanuel Baptist Church.
Barry Briggs - owner of true value hardware store in Blackwell, leads worship and directs choir at Immanuel Baptist Church
John Ousley - vocal music director at Blackwell Middle School and Blackwell High School
Mark Meador - 7th grade science teacher/coach at Blackwell Middle School and leads worship and directs choir at First Baptist Church.

From The Chairman Of the 101 Rodeo Foundation

Welcome!
Well we survived our fifty-year celebration and every foundation member feels it was a great success. With the improvements of our new chute heaven, adding the princess contest, and serving free BBQ as just a few additions last year, we received great reviews from the community and rodeo participants. It is my hope to make each year even better that the last for my family and yours!

Our capital improvements for this year include phase II lighting project, new roofing under chute heaven, and of course those bleacher boards.

Another addition that keeps growing and improving is the free dance and concert after each night’s performance on the rodeo grounds. This year we are having some local red dirt bands – Friday, Evan Michaels and Jason Boyd on Saturday.

I know I have covered this several time but I cannot thank the local business and the community for their support in assisting us with continuing the tradition of the 101 Ranch Rodeo.

Thanks again and enjoy the performance!
Larry Goodno, President
101 Rodeo Foundation

This Barrelman a Natural - John Harrison was born into rodeo.

The grandson of the great Freckles Brown, the 1967 world champion bull rider and one of the first inductees into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Harrison was raised around the sport.

John lives in Soper, Okla., with wife, Carla, daughter Addison, and son Cazwell. He has a degree in Ag.-business and is a certified Equine Massage Therapist.

John was six when he received his first trick-riding lesson after watching a trick rider perform at a nearby rodeo. Since then he has trained and performed with many of the best trick riders in the world.

John became a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) in 1999, as a trick and roman rider, and trick roper. He has since diversified and added barrelman to his PRCA card.

Today John entertains with his walk & talk comedy that is backed by his quick with, and with his two strongest acts; Miss Rodeo Universe and Comedy Trick Riding.

John has been selected to perform 3 times at the prestigious Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nev. Four times he has been nominated for Comedy Act of the Year.

John started off Roman riding and trick riding, but it got to a point where with the economy, rodeos weren’t hiring specialty acts and a barrelman. The first thing they’d cut was the specialty act, so it became harder and harder to get jobs. So he was looking for a way to create an act that could keep me going, so he came up with my Miss Rodeo Universe act and it kept him on the road.

John will bring many things that you have never seen before, he brings a unique talent that really serves the fans well. You will defiantly get a kick out of him.

Miss Rodeo Universe is a satire of rodeo queens and allows Harrison to show off his comedic skills and his work on horseback. It’s not only physical comedy but also visual comedy, something that can be best appreciated in person. Any rodeo you go to, you always hear a good rodeo queen story ... There are queens falling off horses or not acting very ladylike. He just exaggerates it all.

In his young career, Harrison has worked some of the biggest rodeos in the country, including the prestigious Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days, Rodeo Houston and the National Finals Rodeo. He’s been televised on Good Morning America, and rodeo has helped him get a special, late night tour of the White House.

But there’s one thing that keeps him coming back, one thing that led to his tweaking a career so that he could continue to chase his dreams and follow his passion.

According to Harrison, “There’s nothing better than walking out of the arena and knowing the fans were having a good time.”

John Harrison will bring his entertaining show to Ponca City as the contract act and funnyman for the 101 Wild West Rodeo, which will take place August 12 thru 14. Performances will be 8 p.m. nightly.

Rodeo Announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips Dons Another Hat; Grand Marshal

Long-time rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips for his 20th straight year here at the 101 Wild West Rodeo will again cover the rodeo action from the announcer’s area.

In recognition of his twenty straight years as the announcer for the 101 Wild West Rodeo Dr. Lynn Phillips will be dawning yet another hat during this year’s rodeo week. He will be leading the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade in downtown Ponca City, Saturday morning at 10 a.m. as this year’s Grand Marshal.

Here’s a switch. During the week, he calls the shots in the tense, sterile arena of a hospital operating room. But on weekends, Dr Lynn Phillips trades his stethoscope and surgical greens for a silver felt cowboy hat, a silver belt buckle and a silk bandanna and picks up a microphone as a professional rodeo announcer.

During his career as a rodeo announcer, Lynn can truthfully say, “I’ve announced everywhere from Wahoo to Kalamazoo.” A few years ago, he announced a rodeo in the Wings Hockey Stadium in Kalamazoo, Mich., and then he had the pleasure of announcing the PRCA rodeo in Wahoo, Neb. Lynn commented, “Traveling is one of the things I enjoy most about announcing.”

Medicine can’t match his weekend rodeo hobby for excitement, “I still get butterflies before I start announcing,” Phillips smiles, “but unlike years ago, now they fly in formation.”

As long as this announcer is behind the microphone, you will probably never hear the question “Is there a doctor in the house?”

But, with all kidding aside….his accent is silky smooth, his shtick is as polished as the boots he wears and the organizational skills he displays on a nightly basis are the stuff of a legend.

During timeouts, he can entertain as well as educate. During the action, he can clarify and add color.

Slack Begins Tonight for 101 Rodeo

By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

The 101 Wild West Rodeo officially begins at 8 p.m. Thursday for a three-day run at the 101 Ranch Arena on North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue.

But, for those of you, who like to see extra and exciting events, get ready for that tonight, as the Andrews Rodeo Company and the 101 Rodeo Foundation puts on steer roping for a total of 59 participants in a two go-round event at 8 p.m.

As a result, a number of area ropers will also get their ropes ready for tonight, and that means that many area rodeo fans will get a chance to see some really good efforts and not have to drive very far to get back home.

The lineup notes that ropers from a short distance may begin early, but when the second go-round begins, they’ll be at the back of the list as the lineup flip-flops.

Steer roping is not on the main rodeo fare that begins the three-night performances on Thursday. It’s an effort to give steer ropers the opportunity to show off and if there is any indication at all that they will fail, that will be the big surprise. The steer roping event is exciting, as the roper tries to get the critter to turn once it is roped.

Area fans will get a chance to see area ropers, including Roger Branch of Perkins, Tyler Mayes of Ponca City, Grady Potter of Arkansas City, Kan., J. Paul Williams of Burbank, Brad Prather of Skiatook, Shorty Garten of Pawhuska, Larry L. Stewart of Stillwater, Ralph Williams of Skiatook, Gip Allen of Pawhuska, Dee Kyler Jr. of Pawhuska, Rod Hartness of Pawhuska, Cody Garnett of Barnsdall, Chet Herren of Pawhuska, Joey Bills of Pawhuska and Matt Smith of Pawhuska.

Anyway, the main event will be quite exciting, as the 51st 101 Wild West Rodeo gets under way on Thursday. It will “Are you tough enough to wear pink?” night.

The color pink is not something you would usually associate with the tough sport of rodeo; however, breast cancer has touched the lives of many rodeo and western lifestyle families. Rodeo committees, western event producers and western manufacturers have joined together to raise awareness and funds for the fight against breast cancer.

The TETWP campaign puts this important health issue top-of-mind at rodeos and western events across America and Canada. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation which organizes and puts on the 101 Wild West Rodeo is pleased to join those who have already gotten behind this campaign and the momentum continues to build.

At Thursday’s performance, the foundation will give $1.00 for each person in the audience who is wearing pink and will donate $50.00 for each event winner who is wearing pink.

Thursday will also be Community Appreciation night come out early and enjoy a free barbecue dinner with ticket purchase from 6:30pm to 7:30pm on the east-side of the rodeo grounds.

On Friday and Saturday there will be a live concert and dance immediately following each night’s Rodeo Performance on the east-side of the arena. Meet the cowboys and contract personnel, visit with some old friends or maybe make some new ones.

“Rodeo Week” in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the east end of Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock. Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo Begins Tonight

By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

TETWP! That’s the promotion for tonight’s opening night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo. It means, are you tough enough to wear pink.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will continue the tradition started last year with the implementation of a Tough Enough To Wear Pink? night. Thursday evening’s performance will be designated as “Pink Night.”

The color pink is not something you would usually associate with the tough sport of rodeo; however, breast cancer has touched the lives of many rodeo and western lifestyle families. Rodeo committees, western event producers and western manufacturers have joined together to raise awareness and funds for the fight against breast cancer. The TETWP campaign puts this important health issue top-of-mind at rodeos and western events across America and Canada. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation which organizes and puts on the 101 Wild West Rodeo is pleased to join those who have already gotten behind this campaign and the momentum continues to build.

At Thursday’s performance, the foundation will give $1 for each person in the audience who is wearing pink and will donate $50 for each event winner who is wearing pink.

That aside, let’s get down to business! The official three-day performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, Thursday through Saturday, at 8 p.m. each night will be held at the 101 Ranch Arena, located in the northwest part of Ponca City on North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue. Arrive early and listen to the great rodeo and western music provided by Stan and Debbie Loughridge (S&D Productions) and that in itself will get you primed for the Grand Entry.

However, true rodeo fans got a taste of some great times Wednesday night, when the 101 Rodeo Foundation and Andrews Rodeo Producers Company provided steer roping that got under way at 8 p.m.
with an expected 59 entrants.

A few didn’t show, but fans got a real treat anyway.

Some of the best came at the end of the first go-round and continued as the flip-flop of entrants brought back the eventual winner and quickest times of the night for top money about 30 minutes later in the second go-round.

In that first ‘go’ came the quickest time of 10.2 by Gannon Quimby of Mannford, but it was tied by Pratt, Kan., roper Rocky Patterson. They claimed $988.12 in the top prize money for the ‘go’ and then put on quite a show a few minutes later in the second ‘go’ that qualified them for bigger money in the average. Patterson fulfilled his 10.2 with a second 10.2 and that figured to be 20.4 for two. It wasn’t quite good enough for top money on two, as a 10.3 by Lee Cody of Gatesville, Texas, between Quimby and Patterson in the first ‘go’ went with a great time of 9.9 in the second ‘go’ for a 20.2 average and that earned him third in the first ‘go’ of $708.46, plus second in the second ‘go’ for $894.90 and then top money of $1,081.34 for two.

Lee had to settle for second best time of the night, when about midway in the second ‘go’ Dan Fisher of Andrews, Texas, had a 9.7 and that earned him $1,081.34. Patterson had the tie for first in the first ‘go’ for $988.12, put the $708.46 away on the second ‘go’ time of 10.2 and then had the 20.4 on two for $894.90. Not bad for less than 30 seconds work!

J. Paul Williams of Burbank, formerly of Ponca City, had an 11.2 in the second ‘go’ for $186.44 but he had a ‘no time’ in the first ‘go’ and that topped any efforts of area ropers.

The full-blown rodeo tonight includes Grand Entry followed by bareback bronc riding, tie down (formerly called calf) roping, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, team roping, girl’s barrel racing and bull riding.

Special events will be mixed in and rodeo fans will know what’s going on throughout the night listening to Rodeo Announcer, Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid, who will also honor the Saturday 101 Wild West Rodeo parade at 10 a.m. along Grand Avenue in Ponca City as the Grand Marshal.

There will also be an extra amount of action tonight after the main performance, as there will be slack involving 22 girl barrel racers, 18 calf ropers and two entered in team roping. At least that’s the schedule posted at the rodeo press box.

Annual Wild West Rodeo Begins

By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Rough stock riders Thursday night at the 101 Wild West Rodeo found out it was tough to stay on the Andrews Rodeo Company of Sammy Andrews, Addielou, Texas.

It was the first night of the three-night performances at the 101 Ranch Arena on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street in Ponca City.

Just after the Grand Entry, led by the 101 Wild West Drill Team, and further introductions, it was time to test those broncs of the Andrews Rodeo Company.

Would you believe, that all six of the competitors scheduled in the bareback riding event, were able to stay on their animal competitor. Some weren’t able to score as well as others, but it was impressive just to see them be able to ride like that. Best of the bunch came from a young man in the States from Marseille, France, by the name of Evan Jayne, who rode Phantom for an 84 score. That easily topped the others, with the best behind that being a u77 posted by Ted Osman of Fort Scott on Big Momma and then a 76 by Yance Day of Tahlequah on Cool Spot.

Just to prove there could be some really good riders in the saddle, Bobby Griswold of Geary on Magic Moment received an 80 to top the saddle bronc riders. He was out front of two, who tied for that second spot at scores of 75. Brett Olive of Ford, Kan., did it on Stricke Force and Luke Rush of Natoma, Kan., did it on Renascence Man.

Maybe the riders had it a bit easier.

Who knows for sure. But steer wrestlers had a tough time when they had to work in “sand pile” as dubbed by Rodeo Announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips describes their activity. Out of the ten, only three were able to get that critter and only two for really good times. Trenton Johnson of Mound City, Kan., had a 4.1 to lead and Steward Gulager of Garland, Kan., did it in 4.6.

Tie-down ropers found out also that while the steers were quick to get out of the chutes, the calves were almost as quick. Out of nine contestants, again, only three were able to rope their younger competitors.

Newkirk’s Stockton Graves did it first in 11.7, but was only good enough at the end of the regular performance, for second as Tyler Garten of Kingman, Kan., had a 10.5.

And then, after the end of the regular performance Thursday and 20 girl barrel racers in slack, there were other competitors facing tiedown roping in slack. Riley Pruitt of Gering, Neb., showed off with an 8.7 and that put him in the top spot so far. But there are two more nights of rodeo, beginning tonight and then Saturday. So anything can happen. The PRCA team roping duos proved to be able to get some good times, with Cody Graham of Everton, Mo., and Jason Thompson of Ozark, Mo., doing the trick in 7.9. That put them on top with Brett Christensen of Alva and J.D. Holland Jr., of Bucyrus, Kan., getting a 10.0. Third at the present time is the team of Brian Dunning, McClave, Colo., and Chance Cole Frazier of Cimarron, Kan., with an 11.6 followed by the team of Chad Saunders, Greenbriar, Ark., and Michael Harris, Vilonia, Ark., with a 12.6.

During girl’s barrel racing, Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., did the clover-leave pattern in 17.61 to lead that event. Best after that for the regular performance crowd came from Diane Martin of Ulysses, Kan., in 18.00 and that was one-hundredth of a second better than the 18.01 posted by Tiffany Teehee of Claremore. Those who did stay for the slack performance of girl’s barrel racers, which began at 10:50 p.m., saw some really good runs. Two were also successful in breaking the 18-second barrier, including the first one, Tana Renick of Kingston in 17.67 and Ashley Leifesta of Willow City, Texas, in 17.77.

Three other good runs are certainly worth mentioning, including Jana Turner of Perkins in 18.02, Tammy Peterson of Cimarron, Kan., in 18.04 and Tanya Steinhoff of Vinita in 18.09.

Getting back to the regular show, bull riders were tossed about quite quickly. Except for one, who came a good distance to ride. Dylan Werner of Bushnell, Fla., on Expectation, got a 79. None of the other nine riders were able to get much more than a couple of jumps before being tossed, some not that fortunate. Local bronc riders in the ranch bronc riding event found Dillon Belair get a 72, but Chris Potter followed and got a 75 to top the four out of the chutes.

Also, local team ropers had some competitive times and should advance to Saturday’s final. That all depends on tonight’s team roping, which will include slack after the regular performance. Thursday’s best came from the team of Darren Springer and Joe Huffman in 9.2 while Brad Swan and Jeffery Swan had a 9.4. Also almost as impressive was the team of Jo MacBourie and Patrick Schartier in 12.2. Depending on how things go tonight, they could be in the Saturday event, which will include another try to go with the good times of Thursday.

Rodeo fans will need to go a bit earlier if they want to see the coronation of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess sponsored by Trout Funeral Home.

That gets under way at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Then following the Grand Entry set for 8 p.m., and the bareback bronc riding, the Coronation of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen, sponsored by Osage Million Dollar Elm will be held.

Princess contestants include Jori Claire Cowley of Vinita, Jada Haken of Pawnee, Harleigh C. Moore of Burbank, Charity Rose Pulliam of Marland and Sierra Sidlo of Ponca City.

Queen contestants include Lauren Hadley of Ponca City, Rebecca Jo Nester of Ponca City and Kandis Rupp of Marshall. Don’t forget, there’s a parade at 10 a.m. Saturday, from Oak Street on West Grand, through Sixth Street on East Grand Avenue. And then it will be time for the Kid’s Rodeo at the Ponca City Library grounds, where a lot of other activity will take place Saturday, probably
through the noon hour.

It’s all a chance to greet old friends and meet some new ones. And that’s just about what happens throughout all of the activities of the rodeo, which his overseen by the 101 Rodeo Foundation.

101 Wild West Rodeo Activities

For Some, It Was a Good Night at 101 Wild West Rodeo

Good Show for Second Night Of Annual Wild West Rodeo

BY BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

By the time you read this, coronation activity had taken place at the 101 Wild West Rodeo Saturday night, as well as performances. However, the 8 p.m. press run for Sunday’s Ponca City News kept those results and crowning activity, from being available.

See Monday’s News for complete results from Saturday, as well as finals that night.

So, to get on with what happened Friday night, the 101 Rodeo Foundation and Andrews Rodeo Company produced quite a show for a rather good crowd at the 101 Ranch Arena located on North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue.

And with the help of Jennie Murray, rodeo secretary for the Andrews Rodeo Company for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this week, results have been obtained. An early exit for your writer Friday was the result of needed help. He was unable to stay for the final three events, local team roping, girl’s barrel racing and bull riding. Wouldn’t you know, some of the best results came in those events.

Let’s go to the final event of the night, when J.W. Harris of Mullin, Texas, rode the bull he was on for an 83 score and that put him in first place for the time being, just ahead of the only other successful rider of the two nights, Dylan Werner of Bushnell, Fla., who had a 79 on Thursday. Will those markings hold up? Check Monday’s News!

Also, in girl’s barrel racing, three zipped around the clover-leaf pattern on the arena floor under 18 seconds. Only one had done that on Thursday night during the regular performance, Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., in 17.61 and then two others in slack, Tana Renick of Kingston at 17.67 and Ashley Leifesta of Willow City, Texas in 17.77. The trio of successful under-18 seconds Friday were Jean Winters of Texline, Texas, 17.72; Ellie Dabney Georgetown, Texas, 17.74 and Tara Tims, Leedy, 17.89.

Tom Nichols and Buddy Bloodso had a 7.8 in local team ropers to nab the top time in that event on Friday, and another team, George Henry and Barry Fagg had an 8.9. Both teams were under the times of the previous night, that included Darren Springer and Joe Huffman in 9.2 and Brad Swan and Jeffery Swan in 9.4. So Saturday’s local team roping event could have been quite a battle.

Earlier on Friday, James Bond of Goodman, Mo., had an 83 in bareback riding on Roly Poly. That put him second to the 84 of Thursday night by Evan Jayne, Marseille, France. Zack Dishman of Beaumont, Texas, had 76 on Hornet Friday night to put him in a tie with Yance Day, Tahlequah, who had 76 on Cool Spot Thursday.

In steer wrestling Friday, Clay Mindemann of Salina, Okla., had 6.2 for the best of the night. It was no match for two really low figures on Thursday, including Trenton Johnson of Mound City Kan., with 4.1 and Stewart Gullager, of Garland, Kan., with 4.6.

The saddle bronc activity Friday found the best score of 76 by Matt Hebbert of Hyannis, Neb. with a 76 on Rackateer. But that was below the 80 of Bobby Griswold from Geary, Okla., on Magic Moment Thursday.

Tie Down Roping on Thursday including slack had Riley Pruitt of Gering, Neb., with 8.7 and none of the Friday ropers could get under 10 seconds. Best was the 11.1 by Trent Creager, Stillwater and then Boe Brown of Harrold, S.D., with 11.2 followed by Stephen Reagor of Tulsa with 11.7. Two others in the regular performances on Thursday Tyler Garten, Kingman, Kan. at 10.5 and Stockton Graves, Newkirk, at 11.7 figure to be in the top of that event.

Logan Hoin had a 68 in local ranch bronc riding but on Thursday, Chris potter had 75 and Dillon Belair had 72. The PCRA team roping on Friday was really tough for the ropers. None of the competitors were able to turn the trick of header and heeler plans which find the header roping the steer, turning it for a two-hind-leg catch. It just didn’t work out for any of them. Best on Thursday was 7.9 from Cody Graham, Everton, Mo., and Jason Thompson, Ozark, Mo.

Annual Parade and Kids Rodeo Held



 

 

51st 101 Wild West Rodeo Ends in a Flurry

By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Challenges were out there Saturday night at the 101 Wild West Rodeo during the final performance of the three-day event staged by the 101 Rodeo Foundation and Andrews Rodeo Company.

Some were met, while others weren’t.

But it was a really good crowd that was watching when the first bucking chute opened around 8:18 p.m. following the Grand Entry. It was rather hot, but that changed in a hurry about 8:35 p.m. or so. The flags were blowing steadily from the south and abruptly changed from the north and stronger winds along with much cooler temperatures, and for some it was a bit threatening. With many leaving the top rows, particularly from the west bleachers, it seemed just a matter of time when the rolling clouds that accompanied the wind would let loose with rain. It didn’t happen, at least not until later in the night. But the threat remained anyway.

For the good crowd that stuck around and weathered the wind at their back, or in their face as the east bleacher group and Chute Heaven, had to endure, the rodeo went on including coronation ceremonies for the 101 Wild West Rodeo princess and queen. Jada Brooke Haven became the princess and Lauren Hadley the queen.

The opening event, bareback riding, found three getting scores that put them in the money, but none could match the 84 of Evan Jayne from Marseille, France, who did it on Thursday night and thus nabbed $1,097.25. Best on Saturday came from Chris Harris of Itasca, Texas, with an 83 on Termite and that put him into a tie with James Bond of Goodman, Mo., who had 83 on Roly Poly Friday. The pair got $714.87 each for their efforts. Clint Burton of Miles, Australia, had 78 on Saturday for fourth, and $399 while Seth Hardwick of Goodwell, Okla., had 77 Saturday to tie Ted Osman, Fort Scott, Kan., and the two got $199.50 each.

Similar results were in the next event, steer wrestling, with none topping the best of 4.1 by Trenton Johnson, Mound City, Kan., for $1,336.17. Stewart Gulager of Garland, Kan., also survived the quick efforts of the bull-doggers, and used his 4.6 to finish second money for $1,105.80.

However, three of Saturday’s bull-doggers got into the money. Kash R. Koester of Chandler, Okla., had 5.4 for $875.42 and Shane H. Frey of Marlow had a 5.5 for $645.05. C.J. Kerr of Paradise, Texas, was sixth with his Saturday effort of 6.6 for $230.37. Clay Mindemann of Salina, Okla., had a 6.2 that also escaped better efforts on Saturday, for fifth, at $414.67.

The crowd did see a champion in the next event, as Tol Cawley put on quite a show in saddle bronc riding. The Crockett, Texas rider on Firelane was accorded an 85 and that clearly bested any ride earlier. It got him $1,254. Two other Saturday riders finished in the top money. Tyrel Larsen of Whitewood, S.D., had 77 on Jet Ski for third and $684, while Wes Bailey of Tampa, Kan., had a 75 on Buckwheat and that got him $91.20, which was a five-way split for fifth and sixth place money. Second went to Bobby Griswold of Geary with an 80 earlier in the week for $950 and fourth went to Matt Hebbert of Hyannis, Neb., with a 76 for $456. Others with 75 scores for $91.20 each were Brett Olive of Ford, Kan., Luke Rush of Natoma, Kan., and two others from Hyannis, Neb., Tucker Sheets and Travis Sheets.

Ropers had a bit of a problem facing the wind as only one was able to get into the money on Saturday and that was third place, when Kaleb Wilber of Cherokee got the job done in the tie down roping with a 10.7. It got him $1,105.56 and just out of second place, which was nabbed by Tyler Garten of Kingman, Kan., who had a 10.5 earlier in the week for $1,396.50. That was almost two seconds slower than the champion for tie down, with Riley Pruitt of Gering, Neb., using his 8.7 to gain top money of $1,687.44.

A pair of 11.1s split fourth and fifth money. They were Trent Creager of Stillwater and Cory Solomon of Prairie View, Texas, each getting $669.15. Sixth went to Boe Brown of Harrold, S.D., who had 11.2 and got $290.94.

 



While the wind may have hampered the calf (tie down) ropers, it apparently didn’t bother a pair of team ropers in the next event, as John Parker of Fay, Okla., and Jace Crabb of Mangum, Okla., had a 6.9, one second better than any time earlier in the week. They got $1,411.94 each for their efforts as header and heeler. Another team of Jesse Stipes and Casey Stipes of Salina, Okla., had a 14.3 and
that earned them sixth place and $243.44 each.

In between were Cody Graham of Everton, Mo., and Jason Thompson of Ozark, Mo., with 7.9 for second and $1,168.50 each. Third went to a 10.0 posted by Brett Christensen of Alva and partner J.D. Holland Jr., Cucyrus, Kan., for $925.06 each. Then in fourth place at 11.6 was the team of Brian Dunning, McClave, Colo., and Chance Cole Frazier of Cimarron, Kan., for $681.63 each and fifth went to the 12.6 of Chad Saunders, Greenbriar, Ark., and Michael Harris, Vilonia, Ark., when they got $438.19 each.

Eight of the ten money winners in girl’s barrel racing finished under 18 seconds, but only two of them on Saturday and they both had 17.87 which figured as tied in the sixthseventh spot. They included Kim Squires of Carnegie and Jessi Eagleberger of Stringtown and each got $360.09.

Best of the girl’s barrel racers was Thursday night, when Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., set the pace on the very first run of the rodeo, at 17.61. She got $1,080.29. Second at 17.67 was Tana Renick of Kingston for $295.96 and third Jean Winters of Texline, Texas, $771.64. Fourth went to Ellie Dabney of Georgetown, Texas, for $y668.75 and fifth Ashley Leifesta, Willow City, Texas, for $514.42.

Tara Tims of Leedey was the eighth under 18 seconds for the rodeo with a 17.89 and it got her $205.77 while there were two that were close. Ninth at 18.0 was Diane Martin of Ulysses, Kan., for $154.33 and tenth was Tiffany Teehee, Claremore, at 18.01 for $102.86.

The crowd did see a bull rider finish in the top three.There were only three rides throughout the rodeo on the Andrews Rodeo Company hefty and somewhat durable stock. Gunar Ramsey of Combine, Texas, had a 78 for third place on Reeses Pieces and that got him $684. Earlier in the week, J.W. Harris of Mullin, Texas, rode Danny Jajek for an 83 score and that got him $1,254 while second money was claimed by Dylan Werner of Bushnell, Fla., with a 79 on Expectation.

 

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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